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Bulletin of 

Wake Forest College 

of Wake Forest University 



,,/W/iV. 






1978-1979 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hil 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinofwakefo19781979 



New Serifs 



April 1978 



Volume 73, Number 3 







Bulletin of 
Wake Forest College of 
Wake Forest University 



Announcements for 



1978-1979 



The Bulletin of Wake Forest University is published seven times annually by the University at Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Second class postage paid at Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Permit Number 078320 

Printed by Winston Printing Company, Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27105 



The Calendar 



August 


24 


Thursday 


August 


25 


Friday 


August 


25 


Friday L 


August 


27 


Sunday J 


August 


28 


Monday \ 


August 


29 


Tuesday J 


August 


30 


Wednesday 


September 


5 


Tuesday 


September 


12 


Tuesday 


September 


29 


Friday 


October 


20 


Friday 


November 


23 


Thursday I 


November 


26 


Sunday J 


November 


27 


Monday 


December 


8 


Friday 


December 


11 


Monday *\ 


December 


12 


Tuesday >- 


December 


13 


Wednesday ^ 


December 


14 


Thursday 


December 


15 


Friday "\ 


December 


16 


Saturday 1 


December 


18 


Monday 


December 


19 


Tuesday ■* 


December 


20 


Wednesday I 


January 


14 


Sunday J 



Fall Semester 1978 

Residence halls open at noon for first year students 
Residence halls open at noon for transfer students 

Orientation for new students 

Registration for all courses 

Classes begin 
Opening Convocation 
Last day to add courses 
Last day to drop courses 
Mid-term grades due 

Thanksgiving recess 

Classes resume 
Classes end 

Examinations 

Reading Day 

Examinations 



Christmas recess 




January 

January 

January 

January 

January 

February 

February 

February 

February 

February 

March 

March 

March 

March 

March 

April 

April 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 



15 Monday 

16 Tuesday 

17 Wednesday 

22 Monday 
30 Tuesday 

13 Tuesday 

14 Wednesday 

15 Thursday 

16 Friday 

23 Friday 

5 Monday 
9 Friday 
10 Saturday 

18 Sunday 

19 Monday 

16 Monday 

17 Tuesday 

7 Monda\ 

8 Tuesday 

9 Wed 

10 Thursday 

11 Friday 

12 Saturday 

14 Monday 

15 Tuesday 

16 Wednesday 

20 Sunday 

21 Monday 



} 



} 



may 

sday 1 
Inesday j 



Spring Semester 1979 

Registration for all courses 

Classes begin for lour- and fifteen-week courses 

Last day to add or drop four- week courses 

Last day to add fifteen-week courses 

Classes end for four-week courses 

Classes begin for eleven -week courses 

POunders' Day Convocation 

Last day to drop fifteen-week courses 

Last day to add eleven-week courses 

Last day to drop eleven-week courses 

Mid-term grades due 

Spring recess 

Classes resume 
Easter recess 
Classes resume 
Classes end 

Examinations 

Reading Day 



Examinations 



Baccalaureate 
Commencement 




The Reynolda Campus 



The Bulletin 



The Calendar 2 

The University 8 

Libraries 9 

Recognition and Accreditation 9 

The College 11 

History and Development 11 

Buildings and Grounds 18 

Purpose 19 

Administration 19 

Student Life 21 

Student Government 21 

College Union 22 

Men's and Women's Residence Councils 22 

Inter fraternity and Intersociety Councils 23 

Honor Societies and Professional Fraternities 23 

Academic Awards 23 

Intramural Athletics 24 

Intercollegiate Athletics for Men 24 

Intercollegiate Athletics for Women 24 

Religious Activities 25 

Cultural Activities 25 

Psychological, Placement, and Career Development Services 26 

Procedures 27 

Admission 27 

Application 27 

Early Decision 28 

Advanced Placement and CLEP 28 

Transfer Credit 28 

Expenses 29 

Tuition 29 

Room Charges 29 

Other Charges 29 

Refunds 30 

Housing and Pood Services 31 

Academic Calendar 31 

Orientation and Advising 31 

Registration 32 

Classification 32 

Class Attendance 32 

Auditing 33 

Dropping 33 

Withdrawal 33 

Examinations 34 

Grading 34 



Grade Reports and Transcripts 35 

Dean's List and Graduation Distinctions 35 

Repetition of Gourses 35 

Requirements for Continuation 35 

Requirements for Readmission 36 

Probation 36 

Senior Conditions 36 

Scholarships and Loans 37 

Scholarships 37 

Loans 41 

Concessions 42 

Other Financial Aid 43 

Special Programs 45 

Honors Study 45 

Open Curriculum 45 

Residential Language Centers 45 

Study at Salem College 45 

Summer Study 46 

January Study 46 

Opportunities for Study Abroad 46 

London and Venice 46 

France 46 

Spain 47 

India 47 

Independent Study 47 

Requirements for Degrees 48 

Degrees Offered 48 

General Requirements 48 

Basic Requirements 49 

Divisional Requirements 49 

Physical Education Requirement 50 

Completion of Lower Division Requirements 50 

Admission to the Upper Division 50 

Fields of Study in the Upper Division 50 

Maximum Number of Courses in a Department 51 

Double Majors and Joint Majors 51 

Senior Testing 52 

Combined Degrees in the School of Law 52 

Combined Degrees in Medical Sciences 52 

Combines Degrees in Medical Technology 53 

Degrees in the Physician Assistant Program 53 

Degrees in Microbiology 54 

Degrees in Dentistry 54 

Degrees in Engineering 54 

Degrees in Forestry 55 

Courses of Instruction 56 



Anthropology 56 

Art 59 

Asian Studies 62 

Biology 63 

Business and Accountancy 67 

Chemistry 70 

Classical Languages 72 

Economics 75 

Education 78 

English 83 

German 87 

History 89 

Humanities 93 

Interdisciplinary Honors 95 

Mathematics 97 

Military Science 100 

Music 101 

Philosophy 1 06 

Physical Education , 108 

Physics 112 

Politics 113 

Psychology 118 

Religion 121 

Romance Languages 126 

Social Sciences 134 

Sociology 134 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 136 

Degrees Conferred 141 

Distinctions Conferred 148 

Enrollment 153 

The Board of Trustees 1 58 

The Board of Visitors 159 

The Administration 161 

The College Faculty 168 

Emeriti 1 82 

The Committees of the Faculty 184 

Index 189 




Wait Chapel on the Plaza 



The University 



Wake Forest University was founded in 1834 by the Baptist State Convention of 
North Carolina. The school opened its doors to students on February 3 as Wake 
Forest Institute, with Samuel Wait as principal. It was located in the Forest of Wake 
County, North Carolina, on the plantation of Dr. Calvin Jones, near which the 
village of Wake Forest later developed. 

Rec bartered in 1838 as Wake Forest College, it is one of the oldest institutions of 
higher learning in the state. It was exclusively a college of liberal arts for men until 
1894, when the School of Law was established. The School of Medicine, founded in 
1902, offered a two-year medical program until 1941. In (hat year the School was 
moved from the town of Wake Forest to Winston-Salem, became associated with the 
North Carolina Baptist Hospital, and was renamed the Bowman Cray School of 
Medicine in honor of the benefactor who made possible the move and expansion to 
a full four-year program. 

A School of Business Administration was established in 1948 and for over two 
decades offered an undergraduate program of study in business. After 1969 the 
professional program for undergraduates was phased out and the Babcock Craduate 
School of Management was formed. The Division of Craduate Studies was established 
in 1961. It is now organized as the Graduate School and encompasses advanced work 
in the arts and sciences on both the Reynolda and Hawthorne Campuses in Winston- 
Salem. A summer session was inaugurated in 1921 and continues on a regular basis. 

In 1946 the trustees of Wake Forest College and the Baptist State Convention of 
North Carolina accepted a proposal by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation to relocate 
the non-medical divisions of the College in Winston-Salem, where the School of 
Medicine already was. The late Charles H. Babcock and his wife, the late Mary 
Reynolds Babcock, contributed a campus site, and building funds were received from 
many sources. Between 1952 and 1956 the first fourteen buildings were erected, in 
Georgian style, on the new Winston-Salem campus. In 1956 the College moved all 
operations, leaving the 122-year-old campus in the town of Wake Forest to the South- 
eastern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

The decade that followed was the College's most expansive, and in 1967 its 
augmented character was recognized by the change in name to Wake Forest Uni- 
versity. Today enrollment in the University stands at over 4,500. Government remains 
in the hands of the Board of Trustees, and development for each of the five schools 
of the University is augmented by Boards of Visitors for the College and Graduate 
School, the School of Law, the Graduate School of Management, and the School of 
Medicine. A joint board of University Trustees and trustees of the North Carolina 
Baptist Hospital is responsible for the Medical Center, which includes the hospital 
and the School of Medicine. Alumni and parents' organizations are also active at Wake 
Forest. Endowment by theZ. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the North Carolina Baptist 
State Convention, and other sources is strong and continuing. The hallmark of 
education at Wake Forest remains the devotion to liberal arts learning and profes- 
sional preparation for men and, since 1942, women. Perhaps unique is a complemen- 
tary devotion to historic church-relatedness and to the Z. Smith Reynolds contract, 
now more than thirty years old. 



The College, Graduate School, School of Law, and Graduate School of Manage- 
ment are located on the Reynolda Campus in the northwest suburb of Winston-Salem. 
The Bowman Gray School of Medicine is about four miles away, on the Hawthorne 
Campus near the city's downtown. The University also teaches regularly at Casa 
Artom in Venice, at the recently acquired Worrell House in London, and in other 
places around the world. 

The College offers courses of study leading to the baccalaureate in more than thirty 
departments and interdisciplinary areas. The School of Law offers the Juris Doctor, 
and the Graduate School of Management the Master oi Business Administration and 
Master of Management degrees. In addition to the Doctoi oi Medicine degree, the 
School of Medicine offers through the Graduate School programs leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the basic medical sciences. The 
Graduate School confers the Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees in most areas 
of the arts and sciences and the Doc tor of Philosophy degree in biology and c hemistry. 

Libraries 

The libraries of Wake Forest University permit reseaich foi undergraduate 
education and in each of those disciplines in which a graduate degree is offered. An 
endowment provided by a substantial gift from the Mary Reynolds Babcock 
Foundation and anothei from Mis. Nancy Reynolds has been assigned to the 
expansion ol library resources, especially to support the graduate program. Further 
sustained development is thus assured. The libraries of the University hold member- 
ship in the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries. 

The library collections total 675,167 volumes. Of these, 514,188 constitute the 
general collection in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library; 69,205 housed in the School of 
Law; 82,322 in the library of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine; and 9,452 in a 
relatively new library in the Babcock Graduate School of Management. Subscriptions 
to 8,060 periodicals and serials, largely of scholarly content, are maintained by the 
four libraries of the University. The holdings of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library 
include 17,407 reels of microfilm, 45,592 microcards, 173,837 pieces of microprint 
and microfiche, and 61,075 volumes of United States Government publications. 

Special collections cover the works of selected late nineteenth and early twentieth 
century English and American writers, with pertinent critical material; a Mark Twain 
Collection; a Gertrude Stein Collection; and the Ethel Taylor Crittenden Collection 
in Baptist History. The recent acquisition of the Charles H. Babcock Collection of 
Rare and Fine Books represents an important addition to the resources of the Z. Smith 
Reynolds Library. 

Recognition and Accreditation 

Wake Forest University is a member of the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools, the Southern Universities Conference, the Association of American Colleges, 
and the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States. The University has chapters 
of the principal national social fraternities, professional fraternities, and honor 
societies, including Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi. 

The Bowman Gray School of Medic ine is a member of the Association of American 



Medical Colleges and is on the approved list of the Council on Medical Education 
of the American Medical Association. 

Wake Forest College was accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools in 1921. The reaccreditation of 1965 included the masters' and Doctor of 
Philosophy degree programs in the Division of Graduate Studies. Accreditation was 
reaffirmed in December 1975. 

The program in counseling leading to the Master of Arts in Education degree is 
accredited bv the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. 




Samuel Wait, founder and first president (1834-1845) 



11 



The College 



Wake Forest College lives on in name as the undergraduate college of arts and 
sciences. It is the center of academic life at the University; through it the University 
carries on the tradition of nearly 150 years of excellence in teaching and preparing 
men and women for business, professional life, and enlightened citizenship. 

History and Development 

The founding of Wake Forest College in 1834 was one manifestation of the 
intellectual and humanitarian reform movement which characterized North Carolina 
and the nation in the decade of the 1830s. The beginnings of the College and the 
formation of the Baptist State Convention were closely interwoven: a leading motive 
for the organization of the Convention was that it serve as an agency for establishing 
an institution that would provide education under Christian influences for ministers 
and laymen. 

The leaders in the movement for Convention and College were Baptist ministers 
and laymen from diverse backgrounds. Martin Ross, a North Carolinian, was a 
prominent Baptist minister in the Chowan area and an advocate of an educated 
ministry; Thomas Meredith, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, had been 
pastor first at New Bern and after 1825 at Edenton; Samuel Wait, a graduate of 
Columbia College in New York, had been pastor of the New Bern Baptist Church 
since 1827. The inspiration of Ross, the scholarship of Meredith, and the leadership 
of Wait combined to lead the Baptists of North Carolina into the formation of the 
Baptist State Convention on March 26, 1830. Fourteen individuals — seven ministers 
and seven laymen — appointed Wait as the Convention's agent to explain to churches, 
associations, and others the need for a college to provide "an education in the liberal 
arts in fields requisite for gentlemen. - ' 

For nearly three years Wait traveled over the state in his wagon, speaking to a large 
number of the approximately 15,000 Baptists who lived in the Piedmont and coastal 
counties of the state. Perhaps as many as one-half opposed missions, education, 
and other benevolences, but after two years of educational canvassing Wait reported 
enough sentiment in favor of the program of the Convention to proceed. 

A 600-acre plantation, located sixteen miles north of Raleigh, was purchased from 
Dr. Calvin Jones in 1832 for $2,000. The North Carolina Uegislature was asked to 
grant a charter for a literary institution based on the manual labor principle. The 
lobbying of opponents, both Baptist and non-Baptist, was effective; only the tie- 
breaking vote of William D. Moseley, speaker of the Senate, secured passage of the 
charter-granting bill. It was a meager charter, subject to various restrictions and 
limited to a period of twenty years, but the birth of Wake Forest had been achieved. Its 
subsequent growth would be the result of creative adjustments and successful 
responses to a series of other challenges. 

After his successful three-year canvass of the state, Samuel Wait was elected 
principal of the new institution. Sixteen students registered on February 3, 1834; 
before the end of the year seventy-two had enrolled. The manual labor principle, 
adopted as a partial means of financing the institution, was abandoned after five 



12 



years, and the school was rechartered in 1839 as Wake Forest College. 

President Wait's home was the farmhouse on the Jones plantation (now preserved 
as a historical museum in the town of Wake Forest). Students lived in what had been 
slave quarters, and classes were conducted in the carriage house. In 1835 construction 
on the first brick building was begun by Captain John Berry, a prominent builder 
who agreed to accept payment in notes due in three annual installments. The 
economic crisis of 1837 had such an adverse effect that support for the College and 
student enrollment steadily declined; only a loan of $10,000 from the State Literary 
Fund in 1841 prevented bankruptcy. During these years of arduous struggle to keep the 
College alive, President Wait exhausted his physical strength and contracted an illness 
which forced him to resign the presidency in 1845. 

William Hooper succeeded Wait, and the prospects of the College became brighter. 
Hooper, a grandson of one of North Carolina's three signers of the Declaration of 
Independence, had received his education at the University of North Carolina. As a 
native North Carolinian with family connections extending over several generations, 
he was able to mobilize public opinion in support of the College. The leadership 
during his brief tenure generated such enthusiasm in support of education that a 
successful campaign for funds retired the debt for the College buildings in 1850. 

After Hooper's resignation the Trustees elected to the presidency Professor of 
Mathematics John B. White, a graduate of Brown University. Since the physical 
facilities were now free of mortgages, fund-raising efforts during President White's 
administration could be concentrated on increasing the College endowment. A 
campaign begun in 1852 had as its goal increasing support by $50,000. The Trustees 
placed in charge of this campaign Washington Manly Wingate, a graduate of 1849 
who within a year and a half raised approximately $33,000. 

But the temper of the times was unsuited to leadership by a Northerner, and Presi- 
dent White resigned in 1854. The Trustees chose as his successor Wingate, then 
twenty-six years old and the first alumnus of the College to serve as president. Under 
his vigorous leadership, which spanned nearly three decades, the quality of students 
improved and new faculty members were added. During the first eight years of 
Wingate's administration, sixty-six students graduated — more than half of the total 
graduated during the first twenty-three years in the life of the College. In 1857 Presi- 
dent Wingate launched a campaign to produce an additional endowment of $50,000, 
over one-half of which was raised in a single evening during the 1857 meeting of the 
Convention. 

This period of growth and expansion was cut short by the division of the Union in 
1861. The Conscription Act of 1863 did not exempt students, and for three years of the 
Civil War the College suspended operations. The buildings were used briefly for a 
girls' school; after 1863 the Confederate government used College facilities as a 
military hospital. 

Following Sherman's march through the South and Lee's surrender at Appomatox, 
a peace of desolation pervaded the region. Supporters of Wake Forest surveyed what 
remained: College buildings, now leaky and in poor repair; approximately $11,700 
from a pre-war endowment of $100,000; the former president and faculty; a loyal group 
of trustees. There was also something else: an indomitable spirit of determination that 
Wake Forest should emerge from the wreck of war and fulfill its mission. 



13 



The needs of the College were great and financial prospects poor, but in November 
1865, barely six months after the end of the war, nine members of the Board of 
Trustees, acting with unwarranted courage, authorized the resumption of classes. 
Wingate was persuaded to resume the presidency, and on January 15, 1866, fifty-one 
students enrolled. The number gradually increased as the South and its economy 
slowly recovered. 

President Wingate realized that the people of North Carolina had to be awakened to 
the need for education in the renascent South, and that they must be persuaded that 
Wake Forest could help serve that need. To launch this campaign, a Baptist- 
sponsored, state-wide educational convention was held in Raleigh. But before funds 
could be collected, the financial crisis of 1873 ended all immediate hope for endow- 
ment. The failure of the 1873-74 fund-raising campaign placed the College in a 
precarious position. The triple encumbrances of war, reconstruction, and financial 
panic made it evident that little money could be raised in North Carolina. The 
Committee on Endowment of the Board of Trustees appointed James S. Purefoy, a 
local merchant and Baptist minister, their agent to solicit funds in the Northern states 
for continued operation of the College. While serving as treasurer of the Board before 
the war, he had salvaged $11,700 from the pre-war endowment of $100,000 by 
persuading the Trustees to invest half of the endowment in state bonds. After two years 
of unrelenting and often discouraging labor, without remuneration, he placed 
in the hands of the Trustees the sum of $9,200. 

It was also in the bleak days of financial uncertainty that a Wake Forest student, 
James W. Denmark, proposed and founded the first college student loan fund in the 
United States. A Confederate veteran, Denmark had worked six years to accumulate 
enough money for his own college expenses. Soon after entering Wake Forest in 1871 
he realized that many students had the same great financial need. From his meager 
funds he spent five dollars for post cards and wrote to college presidents across the 
country asking how their loan funds were organized. When he found that the colleges 
had none, he enlisted the support of faculty and students at Wake Forest and in 1877 
persuaded the Legislature to charter the North Carolina Baptist Student Loan Fund. 
Chartered with a capital of $25,000, it was actually begun with a paid-in capital of only 
$150. Now known as the James W. Denmark Loan Fund, it is the oldest college student 
loan fund in the United States and has assets of $325,000 to serve the needs of students 
according to the purposes of its founder. 

By the close of President Wingate's second administration in 1879, the College had 
been successfully revived. The endowment had been increased from approximately 
$11,000 to $40,000; a new library building had been constructed; another building, 
Wingate Hall, was under construction. Perhaps the greatest service President Wingate 
rendered was bringing to the College a faculty of highly qualified scholars who served 
the College with distinction and dedication over many years. Among them were 
Professors William G. Simmons (1855-88), William Royall (1859-70; 1880-92), 
William Bailey Royall (1866-1928), Luther Rice Mills (1867-1907), and Charles Elisha 
Taylor (1870-1915), who served as president from 1884 to 1905. Two other scholars 
who became tutors or adjunct professors in the last year of President Wingate's 
administration were also destined to play important roles in the life of the College: 
Needham Y. Gulley, who established the School of Law in 1894 and served as its first 



1 1 



dean for thirty-six years, and biologist William Louis Poteat, who served the College 
for fifty years, twenty-two of them as president. 

The administration of President Thomas Henderson Pritchard, which followed 
that of President Wingate, was brief and served principally to further Wingate's efforts 
to persuade Baptists and other North Carolinians to improve the deplorable 
condition of education in the state. The second alumnus of the College to serve as 
president, Pritchard was an eloquent speaker whose prominent leadership among 
Baptists increased the patronage of the College and improved its image among its 
constituency. 

Charles Elisha Taylor, whom President Wingate had brought to the faculty in 1 880, 
was elected in 1884 to serve as the sixth president. In 1882, while professor of moral 
philosophy, he had proposed to the Board of Trustees a plan to increase the endow- 
ment from $53,000 to $100,000. He recommended a short one-year campaign and the 
solicitation of funds from a few wealthy individuals rather than the usual protracted 
campaign among Baptists generally who had little money to contribute. In the course 
of his efforts to increase the endowment. Professor Taylor succeeded in enlisting the 
support of Jabez A. Bostwickof New York City, whose contributions established Wake 
Forest as a private endowed college. 

President Taylor's administration from 1884 to 1905 brought enrichment of the 
academic program in a variety of ways. Academic departments were increased from 
eight to thirteen and the size of the faculty more than doubled. Two new schools were 
added: the School of Law in 1894 and the School of Medicine in 1902. Progress in other 
areas included the addition of three buildings: a science laboratory, a general class- 
room building, and a new gymnasium. The campus was landscaped, and with the able 
assistance of President Taylor's co-worker "Doc tor" Tom Jeffries, over 400 trees were 
planted, making Magnolia grand/flora almost synonymous with the Wake Forest 
campus. 

President Taylor was succeeded by William Louis Poteat. Affectionately known as 
"Doctor Billy" to students during and after his twenty-two year administration, he 
continued to promote the general growth of all areas of College life. Special emphasis 
was placed on development in the sciences, reflecting in part the interests of the presi- 
dent and in part the need to enrich the pie-medical training required by the new 
School of Medicine. 

As student enrollment increased from 313 in 1905 to 742 in 1927. there was a 
corresponding increase in the size of the faculty. Registration in religion, English, 
education, and the social sciences required more administrative direction, and a dean 
and a registrar were employed along with a library staff. Expansion of physical 
facilities included science laboratories, two new dormitories, an athletic field, a 
heating plant, aird an infirmary. Propelled by the trend of the other colleges in the 
state, Wake Forest gave more attention to sports and achieved an envied reputation in 
baseball and football. Also notable during President Poteat's administration was 
the continued growth of the endowment. Through the efforts of Professor John B. 
Carlyle, $117,000 was added, one-fourth of it contributed by the General Education 
Board of New York. Later a substantial gift was received from Benjamin N. Duke, and 
$458,000 came from the Southern Baptist Convention. 

Beyond these significant material advances. President Poteat brought distinction in 



L5 



the form of state and national recognition. A devout Christian, an eloquent speaker, 
and an accomplished scholar, he became a national leader in education and probably 
the foremost Baptist layman in the state. As a distinguished scientist he was among the 
first to introduce the theory of evolution to his biology classes. The Christian 
commitment in his personal and public life enabled him to defend successfully his 
views on evolution before the Baptist State Convention in 1924, in a major victory for 
academic freedom that attracted nation-wide attention. Through his influence and 
that of Wake Forest alumni who supported his view, the North Carolina Legislature 
refused to follow other Southern states in the passage of anti-evolution laws in the 
1920s. 

During the administration of Poteat's successor, Francis Pendleton Gaines 
(1927-1930), the academic program strengthened. In 1930 the Trustees selected 
Thurman D. Ruthin, dean of the medical school, to fill the presidency. Kitchin was 
a member of a family prominent in state and national affairs: one brother, William 
W. Kitchin, had served as governor of North Carolina; another, Claude Kitchin, had 
served as majority leader in the United States House of Representatives. Kitchin 's 
twenty-year administration was one of progress in the face of many obstacles — 
Depression, destructive campus fires (one of which destroyed venerable Wait Hall), the 
disruption caused by World War II, and a depleted student body. 

Notable accomplishments during this period were the approval in 1936 of the 
School of Law by the American Bar Association and in 1941 the removal of the 
School of Medicine to Winston-Salem, where it undertook full four-year operation 
in association with the North Carolina Baptist Hospital as the Bowman Gray School 
of Medicine, named after the benefactor whose bequest made expansion possible. 

World War II brought other changes. Although the College was able to remain 
open, enrollment dropped in 1942 to 474. The College met this crisis by modifying 
its century-old admissions policy and becoming a coeducational institution that 
year. In the post-war period, enrollment mushroomed with the return of the veterans 
and reached a peak of 1.762 by 1949. Just before World War II a $7,000,000 capital 
expansion campaign for buildings and endowment had been launched by President 
Kitchin. The war forced the postponement of construction, but out of the campaign 
came a proposal which offered another war-ridden Wake Forest an opportunity for yet 
another rebirth. The Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation proposed that up to $350,000 a 
year of its income be given in perpetuity to the College, provided that the entire 
College be relocated in Winston-Salem and that other friends of the College provide 
a campus site and buildings. In 1946 the Board of Trustees, the Convention, and the 
Baptist constituency of the state accepted the Reynolds proposal. Charles H. Babcock 
and his wife Mary Reynolds Babcock offered a 320-acre tract of their Reynolda estate as 
a site for the new campus. 

In 1948 the Baptist State Convention held a campaign among the churches to raise 
$1,500,000 for buildings on the new campus. The money raised in this campaign, a 
large part of which was transmitted at the groundbreaking ceremonies, was applied to 
Wait Chapel. In the same year the Trustees employed the American City Bureau to 
raise $1,500,000 in Winston-Salem for construction on the new campus. This money 
was held by the Wachovia Bank until construction was begun in 1952, and was applied 
to the first science building, Salem Hall. 



16 



To move an institution over 100 years old from its rural setting 1 10 miles to a new 
campus in an urban area required leadership of great vision, determination, and 
youthful vigor. To succeed President Kitchin, who retired on his sixty-fifth birthday, 
the Trustees in 1950 elected to the presidency Harold Wayland Tribble, then president 
of Andover Newton Theological School and a noted Baptist theologian. President 
Tribble immediately began to mobilize alumni and friends of the College, and the 
Baptist State Convention, in support of the great transition. In November 1950 he 
persuaded the Convention to remove its stipulation that all funds for construction 
be in hand before building could begin. In November 1951 the Convention adopted 
the Nine Year Advance Program, effective January 1, 1952, to increase the Conven- 
tion contributions to its col leges for capital needs. It was anticipated that this program 
would provide $10,000,000, of which the Wake Forest share would be $2,500,000. To 
provide these extra funds, the Convention froze its contributions to the Southern 
Baptist Convention at the 1952 level, all increases going to the Nine Year Program. 
Because of the increased support which the College was receiving from the Nine Year 
Program, the contract with the Reynolds Foundation was amended in 1954, 
increasing the annual grant to the College from $350,000 to $500,000. The Foundation 
agreed that funds for operation following the College's removal to Winston-Salem 
could be used for building during the period of construction. 

In the spring of 1951, William Neal Reynolds and Nancy Reynolds offered an 
anonymous challenge gift of $2,000,000 on condition that the College raise $3,000,000 
by June 30, 1952. The deadline was extended and the challenge met by January 1953. 
Mr. Reynolds died in September 1951 — the Foundation assumed his $1,500, 000 share 
of the challenge grant — and he willed Wake Forest $1,000,000, to be paid at the time 
ol removal. In recognition of his bequest the new gymnasium was named for him. 
Because of the capital funds received from the Reynolds Foundation, the Trustees 
voted that the library be named the Z. Smith Reynolds Library and the administration 
building Reynolda Hall. Along with Wait Chapel, the six main residence halls — four 
for men and two for women — and a building for the School of Law, these buildings 
comprised the heart of the new Reynolda Campus. 

Groundbreaking ceremonies were held in Winston-Salem on October 15, 1951, 
when a crowd of more than 20,000 watched President Harry Truman lift the first 
shovel of dirt to begin construction of the new Wake Forest campus. Between 1951 and 
1956, fourteen buildings were erected; the removal of the College to its new home 
was accomplished in time for the opening of the summer session in 1956. 

During the next eleven years of President 'Fribble's administration the College 
experienced many changes. It had revised its curriculum before moving to the new 
campus, offering greater flexibility to students, whose number increased to 3,022. The 
size of the faculty rapidly expanded, reducing the student/ teacher ratio to fourteen-to- 
one. The campus was further expanded with the erection of Winston Hall in 1961, a 
new women's residence hall in 1962, and Tribble Hall, a general classroom building, 
in 1963. Groves Stadium, seating 31,000, was completed in 1968. 

Additional resources came to the College in its new home. In 1954 the will of 
Colonel George Foster Hankins provided over $ 1 ,000,000 to be used for scholarships. 
In 1956 the Ford Foundation contributed $680,000 to the endowment of the under- 
graduate program and $1,600,000 to the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. After the 



17 



completion of a challenge gift of $3,000,000 offered in 1965, the Foundation raised its 
annual contribution to $620,000. The holdings of the University's libraries more than 
tripled, and the Z. Smith Reynolds Library was awarded the income from an endow- 
ment fund of $4,500,000 contributed by the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation and 
Mrs. Nancy Reynolds. 

Graduate work, first offered in 1866 but suspended during the removal program, 
was resumed in 1961 with the establishment of a Division of Graduate Studies. In 1967, 
recognizing the augmented resources of the College, the Trustees officially changed 
the institution's name to Wake Forest University. The Division of Graduate Studies 
became the Graduate School and the name Wake Forest College was retained as the 
designation for the undergraduate school. 

After seventeen years of strenuous effort, President Tribble retired in 1967, leaving as 
his lasting memorial the removal of the College from Wake Forest to Winston-Salem 
and its changed status from College to University, with enhanced resources and 
academic distinction. As his successor the Trustees chose James Ralph Scales, former 
president of Oklahoma Baptist University and former clean of arts and sciences at 
Oklahoma State University. Since his administration began there have been 
important new developments. The Guy T. and Clara H. Carswell Scholarship Fund, 
valued at $1,600,000, was established to undergird the undergraduate college. The new 
Graduate School of Management in 1969 was named in honor of Charles H. Babcock. 
Through the generosity of the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation and Mrs. Nancy 
Reynolds, a building was constructed to house the Babcock School; a subsequent gift 
of $2,000,000 was received from the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation for endow- 
ment. The Fine Arts Center was completed in 1976, offering unparalleled facilities for 
studio art, art history, and theatre. Its building marks a major phase of the College's 
growth in comprehensive liberal arts education. 

Complementing this material growth, Wake Forest has expanded its curriculum to 
offer study for the baccalaureate degree in over thirty areas: accountancy, anthro- 
pology, art, biology, business, chemistry, classical studies, economics, education, 
English, French, German, Greek, history, Latin, mathematical economics, 
mathematics, mathematics-business, mathematics-biology, music, philosophy, 
physical education, physics, politics, psychology, religion, Romance languages, 
sociology, Spanish, speech communication, and theatre arts. Also available are 
combined curricula in law, medical sciences, medical technology, microbiology, 
dentistry, engineering, forestry, and the physician assistant program. 

The academic calendar is designed for controlled flexibility in undergraduate study. 
There is a fifteen-week fall semester, a four-week January term, a spring semester 
offering both fifteen- and eleven-week courses, and two summer terms of five and a 
half weeks each. Exchange programs with local institutions and with universities 
abroad have further expanded the student's range of choice and opportunity. In 
acidition, Wake Forest maintains residential centers in Venice and London for foreign 
study within the College curriculum. As a mark of increased academic stature, the 
William Rand Kenan Foundation in 1970 established the first fully endowed 
University professorship at Wake Forest. It is held by Kenan Professor of Humanities 
Germaine Bree. 



Buildings and Grounds 

Wake Forest is situated on approximately 320 acres; its physical plart consists of 
over thirty buildings, most of which are of modified Georgian architecture and 
constructed of Old Virginia brick trimmed in granite and limestone. The Reynolda 
Gardens annex, consisting of about 150 acres and including Reynolda Woods, 
Reynolda Village, and Reynolda Gardens, is adjacent to the campus. Nearby is the 
Graylyn Estate, maintained by the University. 

Wait Chapel is named in memory of the first president of the College. Its main 
auditorium seats 2,300 and is the home of Wake Forest Baptist Church; Dains Chapel 
seats 150 and is used by the Church and by the College for smaller services. Wingate 
Hall, named in honor of President Washington Manly Wingate, houses the Depart- 
ment of Music, the Department of Religion, and the offices of the Church. 

Reynolda Hall, across the upper plaza from Wait Chapel, is an administration 
building and student center. Most administrative offices for the Reynolda Campus are 
there, along with the College Union and other student activities. The Z. Smith 
Reynolds Library houses the main collection of books and documents on the 
Reynolda Campus. Along with six floors of open stacks, with a capacity for about 
1,000,000 volumes, it has reading and reference rooms for study. 

Winston Hall houses the Departments of Biology and Psychology, Salem Hall the 
Departments of Chemistry and Physics. Both buildings have laboratory as well as 
classroom and special research facilities. Harold W. Tribble Hall accommodates the 
humanities and social science departments and has a curriculum materials center, an 
honors seminar room, a philosophy library and seminar room, and a larger lecture 
area, DeTamble Auditorium, with an adjacent exhibition gallery. Instruction in 
mathematics, business, and accountancy is carried out in Charles H. Babcock Hall, 
which also houses the Babcock Graduate School of Management. The School of Law 
occupies Guy T. Carswell Hall. 

The Fine Arts Center is of contemporary design appropriate to the functions of 
studio art, theatre, and instruction in art history and drama. Off its lobby is a laige 
gallery for special exhibitions. In the art wing are spacious studios for drawing, 
painting, sculpture, and printmaking, along with a smaller gallery and class- 
rooms. In the theatre wing are design and production areas and two technically 
complete theatres, the larger of traditional proscenium design and the smaller for 
experimental ring productions. The lobby and an open court are also used for student 
theatre. 

The W. N. Reynolds Gymnasium is equipped with classrooms for instruction in 
physical education, courts for basketball and other indoor sports, a swimming pool, 
and offices for the Department of Physical Education, intercollegiate athletics for men 
and women, and military science. Adjacent are tennis courts, sports fields, and a track. 
Nearby are new indoor tennis and indoor track and field centers. 

There are four main residence halls for undergraduate men: Kitchin House, Poteat 
House, Davis House, and Taylor House. For women there are four residence halls 
on the lower plaza of the campus: Bostunck, Johnson, Babcock, and New Dormi- 
tory Residence Halls. Just off the main campus are twelve apartment buildings for 
faculty and married students. A townhouse apartment building has been completed. 



Purpose 

The most recent formally adopted statement of the purposes and objectives of the 
University includes the following: "As an institution founded by the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina, Wake Forest University seeks to shape its goals, 
policies, and practices by Christian ideals. It seeks to help its students become 
mature, well-informed, and responsible persons . . . These purposes underlie the total 
academic program of the University. Through them the University seeks to prepare its 
students for careers in teaching, the ministry, law, medicine, business, research, and 
other professions." 

The special mission ol the College, operating within the framework of these 
principles, is to educate the total man and woman within the limits and capacities 
of individual talent, preparation, and interest. The College is neither a preparatory 
school for academic deficiencies nor a professional school for vocational training. In 
tradition and design it is an institution ot liberal arts where athletic, artistic, and 
social activities are fostered on a firm foundation of education in the humanities the 
social and natural sciences, mathematics, and the fine arts. 

Proud of its heritage and c iic umspec t in the responsible use of freedom, the College 
encourages the spirit of free inquiry. It seeks faculty and administrators who have 
a commitment to the search for knowledge, wbo have an awareness of their own 
responsibilities as citizens in a free society, and who have a sense of obligation to the 
students who help shape tomorrow. It invites applicants who are willing to accept the 
challenge of new ideas, with a commitment to education as the means of achieving 
their own personal development and of helping to solve the problems of an 
increasingly complex society. It believes that all students should know something of 
the physical world and the scientific method by which data are gathered, verified, and 
organized; that they should be knowledgeable about the social relationships which 
make up the adult world; that they must cultivate the heritage of the past and be 
concerned for spiritual, moral, and physical development; and that as graduates they 
should be able to communicate effectively in all areas with their fellow men and 
women. It seeks to instill a sense of the dignity and worth of the individual, a love of 
freedom, an awareness of the continuity of human experience, and a sense of respon- 
sibility to others. 

Administration 

The College is administered by the Provost, who is the chief academic officer of the 
University; by the Dean of the College, who is responsible for academic planning and 
administration in all areas of undergraduate life; by Associate and Assistant Deans, 
who supervise academic counseling; by a Coordinator of Student Services, a Dean of 
Men, and a Dean of Women, who advise residential, social, and cultural life; and by 
the committees of the faculty listed in this bulletin. 







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21 

Student Life 



Student government in the College has executive, legislative, and judicial func- 
tions. The College Union plans, directs, and funds social and entertainment activities. 
Social fraternities for men are governed by an Inter fraternity Council, and societies for 
women by an Intersociety Council. A Men's Residence Council and Women's Resi- 
dence Council are open to all students who live on campus. There are chapters of the 
major honor societies and professional societies for qualified students, and a number 
of academic awards made by the University for distinguished student achievement and 
service. Intercollegiate athletics for men and for women and an intramural sports 
program are strong, distinguished by tradition and by performance. Religious and 
cultural activities are central to the life of the College and similarly distinctive. The 
University offers a number of additional services to students relating to their physical 
and mental health, spiritual growth, and preparation for professional life. 

No one can take advantage of all of the opportunities for growth, service, assistance, 
and recreation which are available. The goal of the student life program is to 
encourage students to become confident people who can make intelligent choices and 
assume active responsibility for themselves and their future. 

Student Government 

The executive branch of the student government is comprised of the four student 
body officers — president, vice president, secretary, treasurer — and the executive 
advisory committees. Reporting directly to the officers are various committees which 
work on improving service to students. These committees are open to all students who 
wish to serve. 

The Student Legislature is composed of fifty-five student representatives: the vice 
president of the student body serves as speaker. The Legislature represents the interests 
of students in social and academic matters and promotes and funds projects of benefit 
to the student body and the larger community. It oversees the dispensation of funds to 
student groups and recommends the chartering of newly formed student organiza- 
tions. Major committees are the Charter Committee, the Student Budget Advisory 
Committee, and the Student Economic Board. 

The honor system is an expression of the concern that students be 
motivated by ideals of honor and integrity. It is an integral part of the student govern- 
ment of the College as adopted by students and approved by the faculty. Its essence is 
that each student's word can be trusted implicitly and that any violation of a student's 
word is an offense against the whole student community. The honor system binds 
students neither to give nor receive aid on any examination, quiz, or other pledge 
work; to have complete respect for the property rights of others; not to make false 
or deceiving statements regarding academic matters to another member of the 
University community, nor to give false testimony or refuse to pay just debts; and to 
confront any student who has violated the honor system and tell him or her that it is 
his or her responsibility to report himself or herself or face the possibility of being 
reported to the Honor Council. 

The Honor Council consists of ten members — two co-chairmen selected by the 



Honor Council of the previous year plus two representatives from each class. There are 
three nonvoting faculty advisers. 

The Case Referral Panel receives reports of violations of regulations, conducts 
necessary investigations, draws up specific charges of violation, and refers the matter 
either to the Director of Housing or to the Judicial Board as appropriate. 

It is the duty of the Honor Council to receive, prefer, investigate, and arrange trial 
proceedings in all charges of violations of the honor system. If a student is found 
guilty of premeditated cheating, he or she is immediately suspended or expelled from 
the University. For convictions of lying, stealing, bad debts, interfering with the 
Honor Council, or other forms of cheating, the maximum penalty is explusion and 
the minimum penalty is probation. Expulsion is automatic upon conviction for a 
second offense. All actions of the Honor Council are reported in writing to the Dean of 
the College. 

Any student convicted of violating the honor code is ineligible to represent the 
University in any way until the period of punishment — whether suspension, pro- 
bation, or another form — is completed and the student is returned to good standing. A 
student who has been suspended can be readmitted to the College only on the approval 
of the faculty or its Committee on Academic Affairs. During the period of suspension 
the student cannot be certified to another institution as being in good standing. 

Students enforcing the honor system protect the integrity of their student com- 
munity and their individual rights and reputations. They enjoy the confidence of one 
another, the faculty, the administration, and the public. 

The Judicial Board is composed of twelve members, at least three men and three 
women, who are elected at large from the student body. It is the duty of the Board to 
receive, prefer, and try all charges of social misconduct and violations of University 
rules and regulations for individual students as well as student organizations not 
covered by the Honor Council, the Board on Housing Contracts, or the Traffic 
Appeals Board. A student who violates these regulations or who behaves in such a way 
as to bring reproach upon himself or herself or upon the University is subject to 
penalities ranging from verbal reprimand to suspension on the first offense, only 
after which expulsion may occur. 

College Union 

Under the Director of the College Union there are meeting and recreation rooms, 
lounges, offices for student organizations, a snack, shop, a coffee house, and an 
information center. The Office of Student Activities is responsible 
for scheduling activities, assisting student organizations, and providing supporting 
equipment and services. The College Union Board of Directors, representing all 
undergraduate and graduate students, cooperates with the Union staff in daily 
operations and supervises the efforts of a large body of student volunteers who develop 
and present programs which are designed to complement the College curriculum. 

Men's and Women's Residence Councils 

The Men's Residence Council is open to all residents and encourages students 
toward a comprehensive concept of education, on the principle that learning is not 



23 



restricted to the confines of the classroom but occurs in important ways through 
interaction with fellow students and faculty in residence hall life. Each house has its 
own officers and carries out its own academic, athletic, and social programs to provide 
all students with an opportunity to become actively involved in College life. 

The Women's Residence Council is also concerned with nurturing a compre- 
hensive concept of education. Occasions are provided for discussions and social and 
sports events. The Women's Residence Council officers are elected by students living 
in the four residence halls on the lower plaza of the campus. 




■ governing body of six societies for women, in each of 
which membership is selective: Fideles, Sophs, Steps, Strings, Thymes, and Rigels. 

Honor Societies and Professional Fraternities 

A number of nationally affiliated honor societies have been established: Alpha 
Epsilon Delta (pre-medicine), Beta Beta Beta (biology), Delta Phi Alpha (German), 
Delta Sigma Rho and Tau Kappa Alpha (debate). Eta Sigma Phi (classics), Lambda 
Alpha (anthropology), National Collegiate Players and Anthony Aston Society 
(drama), Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics), Pershing Rifles (military), Phi Alpha 
Thela (history), Scabbard and Blade (military), Phi Beta Kappa, Omicron Delta 
Kappa, and Mortar Board. There are student sections of the American Institute of 
Physics and the American Chemical Society. Professional fraternities include Phi 
Alpha Delta and Phi Delta Phi (law) and Phi Epsilon Kappa (physical education). 
There are also chapters of the national service fraternity Alpha Phi Omega and 
Circle K. 

Academic Awards 

In addition to Phi Beta Kappa, Omicron Delta Kappa, Mortar Board, and other 
distinctions, the following awards are made annually: the A. D. Ward Medal for the 
senior making the best address at commencement: the F. B. Currin Medal for the best 
oration on the topic "Christ in Modern Life"; the D. A. Brown Prize to the student 
whose writing most merits recognition; the M. D. Phillips Prize to the outstanding 
senior in Greek or Latin; the John Y. Phillips Prize to the outstanding senior in 
mathematics; the H. Broadus Jones Award to the student whose paper shows greatest 
insight into the works of Shakespeare; the Tom Baker Award in publications to the 
senior who has made the most outstanding contribution to student publications, the 
Tom Baker Award in debate to the senior who has made the most outstanding 
contribution to intercollegiate debate; the Ruth Foster Campbell Award to the student 



24 



whose ability in the Spanish language and spirit of joyful inquiry into Spanish 
culture have been most outstanding; the Forrest W. Clouts Award to the outstanding 
senior in history; the Claud H. Richards Award to the outstanding senior in politics; 
the John Allen Easley Medal to the outstanding senior in religion; the Lura Baker 
Paden Medal to the outstanding senior in business; the Wall Street Journal Medal 
and a year's subscription to the 'Journal to the outstanding senior in finance; the A. M. 
Pullen and Company Medal to the senior with the highest achievement in accounting; 
the William E. Speas Award to the outstanding senior in physics; the Carolina Award 
to the major in biology who writes the best paper on a subject selected by the national 
biology society; the Biology Research Award to the major in biology who does the best 
piece of original research; the Poteat Award to the student in first year biology who 
plans to major in biology and is judged most outstanding. 



Intramural Athletics 

Through the Department of Physical Education, the College fosters the fullest 
possible participation by students in sports and recreational activities which have life- 
long health-enhancing value. Performed by residence halls, fraternities, societies, and 
independent groups, these include soccer, rugby, football, basketball, baseball, 
track and field, tennis, swimming, wrestling, boating, hiking, rappelling, and general 
conditioning. 

Intercollegiate Athletics for Men 

Under the Director of Athletics, Wake Forest is a member of the Atlantic Coast 
Conference of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and participates in 
intercollegiate football, basketball, baseball, golf, tennis, swimming, cross country, 
and track. Under the military science staff there is also an intercollegiate program in 
riflery. There are club teams in soccer, karate, football, rugby, ice hockey, wrestling, 
and gymnastics. 

The full scholarship allowed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association covers 
tuition, fees, room, board, and books. Wake Forest offers several special scholarships 
and awards: the Brian Piccolo Award for the player judged by the coaching staff to 
best exemplify the qualities of Brian Piccolo during the annual North Carolina game; 
the Brian Piccolo Scholarship for the Chicago-area high school player entering 
Wake Forest who best exemplifies the qualities of Brian Piccolo; the Arnold Palmer 
Award for the Wake Forest Athlete of the Year, as judged by the Monogram Club for 
athletes; the Buddy Worsham Scholarship for one golfer or more; the John R. Knott 
Scholarship for one golfer or more. 

Intercollegiate Athletics for Women 

Under the Director of Women's Athletics, Wake Forest is a member of the Associa- 
tion of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women and participates in basketball, field 
hockey, golf, tennis, volleyball, and cross country. In addition, women are eligible for 
the intercollegiate swimming team. 



25 



The full scholarship allowed by the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics foi 
Women covers tuition, fees, room, and board. Wake Forest offers scholarships foi 
women in golf, tennis, basketball, and volleyball. 

Religious Activities 

The Campus Ministry provides a variety of religious a< tivities, in< hiding a weekly 
voluntary worship service in Davis Chapel. In addition to seasonal celebrations 
throughout the liturgical year, there are retreats, Bible-study and discussion groups, 
and both independent and church-related social service in the larger community. 
Baptist, Methodist, Episcopal, and Catholic chaplains represent their denominations 
and participate jointly in sponsoring activities. Wake Forest Baptist Church meets for 
weekly worship in Wait Chapel and embraces students, faculty, and members of the 
larger community. Membership is open without restriction to ali who seek its 
ministry. 

Cultural Activities 

Under the Director of Theatre, students perform at least fivemajoi produ< dons and 
several lab plays annually, employing faculty, student, and visiting professional 
directors. Under the Director of Radio, WFDD-FM broadcasts year-round to the 
campus and Piedmont North Carolina as an affiliate of National Public Radio. 
In addition to student announcers and technicians, it has a small professional staff. 
Intercollegiate debate at Wake Forest has a long record of excellence, and the College 
hosts two annual debate tournaments, the Novice and the Dixie Classic. 

Student publications include Old Gold and Black, a weekly newspaper; The 
Student, a quarterly magazine; and the yearbook The Howler. Challenge is a student- 
initiated biennial symposium on contemporary affairs which attracts major speakers 
around a central theme of national importance. In addition, the College Union 
sponsors a major speakers series throughout the academic year, and departments in 
the College engage specialists for other series. The Institute of Literature is a program 
of writers, critics, and scholars in English, c lassie al languages, German, and Romance 
languages. The Hester Philosophy Seminar is an annual colloquium devoted to the 
major problems of philosophy and their impact on the Christian faith and is a joint 
undertaking of the Department of Philosophy and the Ecumenical Institute. The 
Robinson Lectures are held biennially and are administered by the Department of 
Religion. The Department of Psychology sponsors a colloquium series throughout 
the academic year. 

Student musicians perform for academic credit in the Choral Union, the Concert 
Choir, the Opera Workshop, the University Symphony, the Demon Deacon Marching 
Band, the Symphonic Wind Ensemble, the Concert Band, the Varsity Pep Band, two 
Jazz Ensembles, the Percussion Ensemble, the Woodwind Quintet, and the Brass 
Quintet. Under the Director of Concerts, major concerts are performed in Wait Chapel 
by leading orchestras and artists from around the world and in the Fine Arts Center by 
selected dance companies. The Department of Music also sponsors performances by 
faculty and visiting artists. 

In addition to studio instruction in the Department of Art. visiting painters, 



26 



sculptors, and pi int makers teach on campus and at the nearby Southeastern Center for 
Contemporary Art, sponsored jointly by the University and the Center. Reynolda 
House has a regular program of instruction in art history related to its special 
collection in American Art. The College Union has an expanding collection of 
contemporary works of art, under student administration and exhibited in Reynolda 
Hall and elsewhere on campus. The T. J. Simmons Collection of paintings, etchings, 
lithographs, and sculpture is also distributed for permanent campus display. An 
active group of student photographers exhibits its own work and that of professional 
photographers in the gallery adjacent to DeTamble Auditorium. Cultural resources in 
the community, beyond nearby Reynolda House and the Southeastern Center for 
Contemporary Art, include the historic restored Moravian village of Old Salem, 
the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, the North Carolina School of the 
Arts and its associated professional performing companies in theatre, dance, and 
music, and the Winston-Salem Symphony and Chorale. Folk ait, professional ait, and 
crafts fairs are frequent. 

Psychological, Placement, and Career Development Services 

Located in Efird Hall, the Center for Psychological Services offers psychological 
counseling, testing, and research services to the University community. 

Located in Reynolda Hall, the Office of Career Development and Placement offers 
assistance and consultation concerning resume writing, interviewing, and career 
planning. It assists students seeking information about temporary employment and 
seniors looking for employment after graduation. 




■m*:. 



27 

Procedures 

All .students are responsible for familiarizing themselves until the portions of this 
bulletin which pertain to their course of study. Statements concerning courses and 
expenses are not to be regarded as irrevocable contracts between the student and the 
institution. The I 'niversity reserves the right to change the schedule of classes and the 
cost of instruction at any time within the student's term of residence. 

Admission 

Candidates for admission must furnish evidence of maturity and educational 
achievement. The Committee on Admissions carefully considers the applicant's 
academic records, scores on tests, and evidence of character, motivation, goals, and 
general fitness for college. The secondary school program of the applicant must 
establish a commitment to the kind of broad liberal education reflected in the 
academic requirements of the College. 

Admission as a freshman normally requires graduation from an accredited 
secondary school with a minimum of sixteen units of high school credit. These should 
inc lude four units in English, three in mathematic s, two in history and social studies, 
two in a single foreign language, and one in the natural sciences. An applicant who 
presents at least twelve units of differently distributed college preparatory study can be 
considered. A limited number of applicants may be admitted without the high school 
diploma, with particular attention given to ability, maturity, and motivation. 

Application 

An application is secured from the Office of Admissions in person or by mail (7305 
Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109). It should be completed 
and returned to that office, if possible no later than February 1 for the fall semester. 
Most admissions decisions for the fall semester are made by March 1, with prompt 
notification of applicants. For the spring semester application should be completed 
and returned, if possible, no later than October 15. Except in emergency the final 
date for applying for the fall semester is August 5 and for the spring semester 
January 1 . Application on this last-date basis is primarily for non-residential students. 

The admission application requires records and recommendations directly from 
secondary school officials. It also requires test scores, preferably from the senior year, 
on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board. An 
accompanying Achievement Test is optional. A $15 fee to cover the cost of processing 
must accompany an application. It cannot be applied to later charges for accepted 
students or refunded for others. The University reserves the right to reject any 
application without explanation. 

A $100 admission deposit is required of all students accepted and must be sent to the 
Office of Admissions no later than three weeks following notice of acceptance. It is 
credited toward first semester fees and is refunded in the event of cancellation of 
application by the student, provided written request for refund is received by the Office 
of Admissions no later than May 1 for the fall semester or November 1 for the spring 
semester. (Students notified of acceptance after May 1 for the fall semester should make 



28 



the admission deposit within two weeks of notification.) Deposits made after May 1 
and November 1 are not refundable. Failure to make the admission deposit is taken as 
cancellation of application hy the student. No deposit is required for summer session 
enrollment only. 

Early Decision 

An Early Decision plan is available to well qualified high school students who 
decide by the close of their junior year that their first college choice is Wake Forest. 
An Early Decision agreement is required with the application, which is sent to the 
Office of Admissions after completion of the junior year or by late October of the 
senior year. Along with high school record, recommendations, and scores on the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test, one or more Achievement Test, especially in English 
composition, is strongly recommended. 

Early Decision applicants are notified of acceptance no later than November 1 for 
the fall semester, and the admission deposit is required by January 1. Applicants not 
admitted are asked to submit a senior year Scholastic Aptitude Test score and 
first semester senior year grade record, or are advised to apply elsewhere. 

Advanced Placement and CLEP 

Advanced Placement credit for college level work done in high school is available on 
the basis of the Advanced Placement Examination of the College Entrance 
Examination Board and supplementary information. Especially well-qualified 
applicants for advanced standing may also be exempted from some basic courses with 
credit on the authorization of the department concerned. Credit by advanced standing 
is computed as credit transferred from another college. 

Under certain conditions especially well-prepared applicants may be granted 
limited college credit through the subject tests of the College Level Examination 
Program of the Educational Testing Service. Such credit may be assigned with the 
approval of the department concerned. 

Transfer Credit 

The number of transfer students who can be admitted each year depends upon the 
availability of space in the sophomore and junior classes. An applicant for admission 
who has attended another college must be a graduate of a standard junior college or 
furnish a certificate of honorable dismissal stating eligibility in all respects to enter 
the college last attended, and must have an overall average of at least C on all college 
work attempted. A student who is admitted from another college before fully meeting 
the prescribed admissions requirements for entering freshmen must remove the 
entrance conditions during the first year at Wake Forest. 

Courses satisfactorily completed in other accredited colleges are accepted subject to 
faculty approval. In general, no credit is allowed for courses not found in the Wake 
Forest curriculum. All credits allowed for advanced standing are held in suspense 
until the candidate has spent one term in residence. The minimum residence 
requirement for a baccalaureate degree is two academic years, the senior and one other. 



29 



Expenses 

Statements concerning expenses are not to be regarded as forming an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the University. The costs of instruction and other 
services outlined herein are those in effect on the date of publication of this bulletin, 
and the University reserves the right to change without notice the cost of instrut tion 
and other services at any tune. 

An admission deposit of $100, which is applied toward tuition and fees for the 
semester for which the student has been accepted, is required to complete admission. 
Charges are due in full on August 1 for the fall semester and December 15 for the spring 
semester. Faculty regulations require that student accounts be settled in full before the 
student is entitled to receive a grade report, transcript, or diploma, or to register lor 
the following semester oi term. 

Tuition 

Per Semester Per Year 

Full-time (twelve or more credits) $1,500 S3, 000 

Part-time S95 per credit 

Students enrolled in the College for lull-time residence credit are entitled to full 
privileges regarding libraries, laboratories, athletic contests, concerts, publications, 
the College Union, the University Theatre, and the Health Service. Part-time students 
are entitled to the use of the libraries and laboratories but not to the other privileges 
mentioned above. They may secure a part-time student ID card, admissions to games 
and concerts, and publications by paying an activity fee of $50 per semester. 

Room Charges 

Double occupancy S235-S250 $470-8500 

Most rooms available for first year students are $235 per semester for men and $250 
for women. Other room rentals range from $210 to $320. 

Other Charges 

Admission application fee of $1^ is required with each application for admission to 
cover the cost of processing and is non-refundable. 

Admission deposit of $100 is required of each student entering for the first time or re- 
entering after a period of non-attendance and must be sent to the Director of 
Admissions within three weeks after acceptance for admission or readmission. The 
deposit is credited to the student's charges for the semester for which he or she has been 
accepted for admission. It is refunded if the Director of Admissions is notified in 
writing prior to May 1 for the fall semester and November 1 for the spring semester of 
cancellation of plans to enter the College. 

Applied music fees are required in addition to tuition for students enrolling for 
individual or class study in applied music in the Department of Music and are payable 
in the Office of the Treasurer. The fee for one credit hour of instruction per semester is 
$75 and for two credit hours per semester is $120. Practice fees are $15 or $18 for organ 



30 



practice, $7 01 $10 for piano practice, and $5 or $7 for other instrument practice for one 
or two hours a day. 

Graduation fee of $20 is required of all students who are candidates for degrees. 

Hospital bed and board charges are made when the student is confined to the 
University Hospital. An additional charge is made for special services and expensive 
drugs. University Hospital charges are $37.50 per day. Since most insurance 
companies do not cover admissions to a university hospital or infirmary, students are 
urged to arrange for the student insurance which covers these charges. The student 
insurance premium is usually under $120 per year. 

Key deposit of $5 is required for each key issued to a residence hall room and is 
refunded when the key is returned. 

Late registration fee of $10 is charged to students registering after the dates set by the 
faculty. 

Library fines are i harged for lost books and for violation of other library regulations 
and are payable in the library. 

Reservation deposit of $100 is required, at a date set by the Office of the Treasurer, of 
students enrolled in the spring semester who expect to return for the fall semester 
beginning in August. It is credited to the student's University charges and is refunded 
if the Treasurer is notified in writing prior to June 1. 

Room change fee of $5 is charged for authorized room changes made after February 
1") in the spring semester. The fine is $20 for any unauthorized change. 

Special examination fee of $2.50 is required for each special examination taken to 
remove a course condition. 

Student apartment rental is payable at $90 per month. 

Motor vehicle registration and traffic fines are $30 and $2 to $10, respectively. All 
students operating a vehicle on campus (including student apartments and the 
Graylyn Estate) must register vehicles they are operating day or night, whether or not 
owned by the operator. All vehicle registrations must be completed within twenty-four 
hours from the first time the vehicle is brought to campus. Fines are assessed against 
students violating parking regulations, copies of which are obtainable from the 
Traffic Office. 

Transcripts of a student's record are issued at a cost of $2 each. 

Refunds 

During the academic year, all students, full- and part-time, receive tuition refunds 

according to the following schedule. This policy applies to students dropping 

courses as well as to those withdrawing. Withdrawals must be official and students 

must turn in their ID cards before claiming refunds. There is no refund of room rent. 

Number of Weeks Percentage of Total Tuition 

Attendance to be Refunded 

1 Total Tuition Less $100 

2 75 percent 

3 50 percent 

4 25 percent 



;i 



Housing and Food Services 

Residence Halls. All unmarried freshmen students are required to live in residence 
halls, except ( 1 ) when permission is granted by the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women 
for the student to live with parents or a relative in the Winston-Salem area or (2) by 
special arrangement when space is not available on campus or (3) if the student has 
lost residence hall space because of a room contract violation. Married students are not 
usually allowed to live in residence halls except when permitted by the Dean of Men or 
the Dean of Women. Residence halls are supervised by the Director of Housing, the 
Directors of Residence Life, head residents, and assistants under the direction of the 
Dean of Men and the Dean of Women. 

The following charges per year apply for each student in the residence halls: in 
Ritchin House, Poteat House, Davis House, Taylor House, Huffman Hall, and Efird 
Hall, $400 for triple rooms, $420 for small double rooms, $470 for large double rooms, 
and $600 for single rooms; in Johnson and Bostwick Residence Halls, $500 for double 
rooms and $600 for single rooms; in Babcock Residence Hall, $570 for double rooms 
and $600 for single rooms; in New Dormitory, $630 for double rooms; in each of four 
townhouse apartments, $640 per occupant; at Graylyn Estate, $630 per occupant. 
For each of the fifty-six married student apartments the charge is $90 per month. 

Food Services. A cafeteria, soda shop, and table service dining room are located in 
Reynolda Hall. Meals may be purchased individually or under an optional board 
plan. The approximate yearly cost individually is $725-$825. The contractual board 
plan reduces cost by about one-fifth. 

Academic Calendar 

The academic calendar of the College includes a fall semester ending before 
Christmas, a spring semester beginning in January and ending in May, and a summer 
session. Courses offered in the fall semester usually meet for approximately fifteen 
weeks. During the spring semester some courses meet on a fifteen-week schedule as in 
the fall, some meet foi four weeks (normally during January), and others meet for the 
remaining eleven weeks of the semester. A student may enroll for fifteen-week courses 
only or tor lour- week and eleven-week com ses only, oi undei c ei tain conditions may 
combine courses from the two tracks during the same spring semester. 

Orientation and Advising 

A three-day orientation period for new students in the College precedes registration 
for the fall semester. An academic adviser who is either a member of the faculty or an 
upperclassman in the peer-advising program provides guidance during and between 
registration periods throughout the student's freshman and sophomore years. 
Meetings with advisers are both in groups and individually and are initiated both by 
the adviser and the student. The adviser suggests and approves courses of instruction 
until the student declares a majoi in a field of study at the end of the sophomore year. 
At that time a new adviser is assigned from the department or departments concerned. 



32 

Registration 

A two-day registration period for all students in the College opens the fall semester 
and the spring semester. Registration involves (1) payment of all tuition and fees in 
full to the Treasurer, (2) obtaining a summary of prior record from the Registrar, 
(3) consultation with the academic adviser, (4) sectioning of classes by departmental 
representatives, and (5) verification of registration cards with class schedules by the 
Registrar. 

A four-week course with a value of four credits constitutes a normal full-time course 
load for the four-week term. Students enrolling for a four-week course that meets 
primarily off-campus may not enroll for a regular fifteen-week course during the same 
semester. Students enrolling for a four-week course on the campus may — if the 
adviser recommends it — enroll at the same time for one regular fifteen-week course 
(3, 4, or 5 credits) otily. Certain one-credit courses, such as music ensemble or physical 
education, may be included in addition at the discretion of student and adviser. 
Students or advisers who encounter extraordinary problems in planning schedules for 
the spring semester may consult the Office of the Dean of the College. 

Classification 

Classification of students by class standing and as full-time or part-time is cal- 
culated in terms of credits. Most courses in the College have a value of four credits, but 
others vary from one credit to five. The normal load for a full-time student is eighteen 
credits per semester; a slightly heavier load is permitted under certain circumstances. 
Twelve credits per semester constitutes minimum full-time registration without 
specific permission to register as a part-time student. (Recipients of veteran benefits, 
grants from state government, and other governmental aid must meet the guidelines of 
the appropriate agencies.) For the January term the normal load is one four-credit 
course; with the academic adviser's approval a student may also register for one fifteen- 
week course concurrently. 

A full-time student in the fall semester of any year may not be a part-time student in 
the spring semester immediately following. Any student who petitions for part-time 
status within the semester in which he or she wishes to gain such status is not eligible 
for a tuition refund. 

The requirements for classification after the freshman year are as follows: sopho- 
more — the removal of all entrance conditions and the completion of not fewer than 
twenty-nine credits toward a degree, with a minimum of fifty-eight grade points; 
junior — the completion of not fewer than sixty credits toward a degree, with a 
minimum of 120 grade points; senior — not fewer than 108 credits toward a degree, 
with a minimum of 216 grade points. 

Class Attendance 

Attendance regulations place the responsibility for class attendance on the student, 
who is expected to attend classes regularly and punctually. One of the most vital 
aspects of the residential college experience is attendance in the classroom; its value 
cannot be fully measured by testing procedures alone. Students are considered suffi- 



33 



ciently mature to appreciate the necessity of regular attendance, to accept this personal 
responsibility, to demonstrate the self-discipline essential for such performance, and 
to recognize and accept the consequences of failure to attend. The instructor is 
privileged to refer to the Dean of the College for suitable action students who are 
deemed to be causing their work or that of the c lass to suffer because of absence or 
lateness. Any student who does not attend classes regularly or who demonstrates other 
evidence of academic irresponsibility is subject to such disciplinary action as the 
Committee on Ac ademic Affairs may prescribe, inc hiding immediate suspension from 
the College. 

The Office of the Dean of the College maintains a list of students who have been 
absent from c lass because of illness certified by the University Health Service, because 
of other extenuating circumstances, 01 as authorized representatives of the College 
whose names have been submitted by appropriate officials forty-eight hours in 
advance of the houi when the absences are to begin. Such absences are considered 
excused and a record ol them is available to the student's instruc toi upon request. The 
instructor determines whethei work missed can be made up. 

Auditing 

Full-time students in the College may audit classes without charge. For others the 
fee is $60 per course. The pet mission ol the instruc tor is necessary for all audits, and 
that of the Dean ol the College for those other than full-time students. Auditors are 
listed with regularly registered students on class rolls and are subject to attendance 
regulations and to other conditions imposed by the insti u< tor. A notation of audit may 
by made on the final grade report and entered on the record of a regularly enrolled 
student. An auditoi receives no grade or credit for the course. An audit course may 
not be changed to a c redit course and a c redit c ourse may not be c hanged to an audit 
course. 

Dropping 

A student who wishes to drop a course before the last approved date must consult 
with the academic adviser and obtain a form from the Registrar and the signature of 
the instructor. Aftei the approved date the student must consult with the academic 
adviser, the instructor lor the course, and the Dean of the College. With the approval 
of the Dean of the College, a failing grade is usually assigned for a course dropped after 
the approved date. For a course dropped without prior written approval of the Dean 
of the College, the student is subject to academic probation for the following semester 
or other penalties imposed by the Committee on Academic Affairs. 

Withdrawal 

A student who finds it necessary to withdraw from the College must do so through 
the Office of the Dean of the College. With the approval of the Dean of the College, 
no grades are recorded lor the student for that semester, but the student's standing in 
courses at the time of withdrawal is taken into consideration when readmission is 
sought. If withdrawal is for academic reasons, failing grades may be assigned in all 



34 



courses in which the student is doing unsatisfactory work. A student who leaves the 
College without officially withdrawing is assigned failing grades in all current 
courses, and the unofficial withdrawal is recorded. 

Examinations 

Final examinations are given at regularly scheduled times. All examinations are 
conducted in accordance with the honor system adopted by the student body and 
approved by the faculty. Under it the student is expected to refrain from unfairness in 
any form and to report to the Honor Council any student he or she knows to be 
cheating. Examinations are turned in with a signed statement that no aid has been 
given or received. 

Grading 

For most courses carrying undergraduate credit there are five final and two 
conditional grades: A (exceptionally high achievement), B (superior), C (satisfactory), 
D (passing but unsatisfactory), E (conditional failure), F (failure), and I (incomplete). 

Grade of E. The grade of E entitles the student to reexamination at any regular 
examination period within a year, or during the first week of the fall semester. A 
permit for reexamination must be obtained in advance from the Registrar, and no 
grade higher than D may be assigned as a result of reexamination. A student who does 
not remove a conditional failure by reexamination must repeat the course to obtain 
credit for it. 

Grade of I. The grade of I may be assigned only when because of illness or some 
other emergency a student does not complete the work of the course. A student who 
does not remove an incomplete within thirty days after the beginning of the next 
semester in which he or she enrolls receives a grade of F for the course. 

Grade Points. Grades are assigned grade points for the computation of academic 
averages, class standing, and eligibility for continuation, as follows: for each credit of 
A, four points; for each credit of B, three points; for each credit of C, two points; for 
each credit of D, one point; for each credit credit of E or F, no points. 

Pass Fail. To encourage students to venture into fields outside their major areas of 
competence and concentration, the College makes available the option, under certain 
conditions, of registering in courses on a Pass Fail basis rather than for a letter grade. 
Courses taken under the Pass/Fail option yield full credit when satisfactorily com- 
pleted, but whether passed or not they are not computed in the grade point average. 

A student may count toward the degree no more than twenty-four credits taken on a 
Pass Fail basis. Freshmen and sophomores are eligible for most four-week courses 
offered on a Pass Fail basis, as well as for certain other courses offered only on a Pass 
Fail basis. A student may during the junior and senior years only elect up to a total of 
sixteen credits on a Pass Fail basis, but no more than five credits in a given semester. 
Courses used to fulfill basic, divisional, or major requirements may not be taken on a 
Pass/Fail basis unless they are offered only on that basis. Courses in the major(s) not 
used for satisfying major requirements may be taken on a Pass Fail basis only if the 
department of the major does not specify otherwise. 



35 



Grade Reports and Transcripts 

A mid-term report and a final report of grades are issued to students by the Registrar 
in the fall and spring semesters. A final report of grades is issued for each summer term. 

Copies of a student's cumulative record are issued by the Registrar, but only on the 
written authorization of the student and payment of $2 per transcript. 

Dean's List and Graduation Distinctions 

The Dean's List is issued by the Dean of the College at the end of the fall and spring 
semesters. It includes all full-time students in the College who have a grade point 
average of 3.0 or better for the semester and who have earned no grade below C during 
the semester. 

Graduation distinctions are determined by the grade point system. A degree 
candidate with a total average of not less then 3.80 foi all courses attempted is 
graduated with the distinction summa cum laude. A candidate with a total average of 
not less than 3.50 for all courses attempted is graduated with the distinction magna 
cum laude. A candidate with a total average of not less than 3.00 for all courses 
attempted is graduated with the distinction cum laude. Particular conditions apply 
to students transferring from other colleges or participating in combined degree 
programs. Details are available in the Office of the Dean of the College. 

Repetition of Courses 

A student may not repeat for credit a course for which he or she has already received a 
grade of C or higher. When a student repeats a course previously passed with a grade 
of D, credit earned for the first attempt is deduc ted from the total credits earned, but 
both grades are computed in the grade point average. 

Requirements for Continuation 

Students are responsible for knowing their academic status and whether they are 
meeting the minimum academic requirements for continuation in the College. 
Requirements for continuation are determined by the bulletin under which the 
student expects to graduate. 

On the basis of their cumulative records at the end of the spring semester, those 
students are academically ineligible to enroll for the following fall (1) who have 
attempted fewer than fifty-four credits in all colleges and universities attended and 
have a total grade point average of less than 1 .35 on work attempted for a grade in the 
College; (2) who have attempted as many as fifty-four but fewer than ninety-eight 
credits and have a total grade point average of less than 1.65 on work attempted for a 
grade in the College; (3) who have attempted as many as ninety-eight but fewer than 
135 credits and have a total grade point average of less than 1.85 on work attempted for 
a grade in the College; (4) who have attempted 135 credits or more and have a total 
grade point average of less than 1.90 on work attempted for a grade in the College. 
Non-credit courses, courses taken Pass Fail, and CLEP and Advanced Placement 
credit are not computed in the total grade point average. 

Ordinarily, a student who is ineligible to continue in the College may attend the 
first summer term and if successful in raising the total grade point average to the 



36 



required minimum may enroll for the following fall semester. The student may attend 
the second summer term if unsuccessful in the first, and if successful then may enroll 
for the following spring semester. If unsuccessful in meeting the minimum require- 
ments by the end of the second summer term, the student may apply for readmission no 
earlier than the following summer session. 

Under exceptionally extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the student, 
and after consultation with the Dean of the College, the student may appeal the 
foregoing eligibility requirements before the Committee on Academic Affairs. 
The Committee on Academic Affairs may also suspend at the end of any semester or 
term any student whose record for that term has been unsatisfactory, particularly with 
regard to the number of courses passes and failed, or any student who has not attended 
class regularly or has otherwise ignored the rules and regulations of the College. 

Requirements for Readmission 

A student seeking readmission to the College must meet the minimum academic 
requirements for continuation. However, a student who has not met the requirements 
( 1 ) may apply for admission to the summer session only, (2) may apply for readmission 
after an absence from the College of at least a year and a half, (3) may apply for read- 
mission after less than a year and a half if enrolled in another college or university, or 
(4) may apply for readmission if the failure to meet minimum requirements was due to 
exceptionally extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the student. 

Probation 

A student is responsible at all times for knowing his or her academic standing. Any 
student who at the end of the fall semester does not have the grade average required for 
continuation at the end of the following spring semester is automatically on academic 
probation. 

Any student who is placed on probation because of honor code or conduct code 
violations is placed on such special academic probation as the Committee on 
Academic Affairs imposes. The Committee on Academic Affairs may at any time place 
on probation a student whose academic performance or social behavior is inconsistent 
with what the Committee deems to be in the best interest of the student or the College. 

Any student convicted of violating the honor code is ineligible to represent the 
College in any way until the period of suspension or probation is completed and the 
student is returned to good standing. Students who are on probation for any reason 
may not be initiated into any fraternity until the end of their probationary period. 

Senior Conditions 

A candidate for graduation in the final semester who receives a grade of E in the 
previous semester may apply to the Registrar for reexamination thirty days after the 
opening of the final semester but not less than thirty days before its close. All con- 
ditions must be removed not less than thirty days before the end of the last semester or 
term of the student's graduation year. The name of a candidate who has a condition 
after that date is dropped from the list of candidates. A candidate who receives a grade 
of E in the final semester or term of the graduation year is not allowed reexamination 
before the next examination period. 



37 



Scholarships and Loans 



The University is committed to the principle that any student admitted to the 
College who demonstrates financial need will receive assistance commensurate with 
that need. 

By regulation of the Board of Trustees, all financial aid must be approved by the 
Committee on Scholarships and Student Aid. Applications should be requested from 
the Committee at 7305 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109. 
Scholarships supported by funds of the College are not granted to students enrolled 
in other schools of the University. To receive consideration lor financial aid. tin- 
applicant must either be enrolled in the College or have been accepted for admission. 
The financial aid program comprises institutional, state, and federal scholarship, 
loan, and work funds. Full-time students are eligible to apply for any of these funds. 
Half-time students are eligible to apply for federal funds. Half- and part-time students 
are eligible to apply lot limited institutional funds. 

Need is a factor in the awarding of most financial aid, and eac h applic ant must file a 
financial statement with the application loi financial aid. After reviewing the 
standard financial analysis, the Committee on Scholarships determines aid awards, 
and aid is credited, by semester, to the student's account in the Office of the Treasurer. 
The Committee on Scholarships reserves the right to revoke financial aid for unsatis- 
factory academic achievement or for violation of University regulations or federal, 
state, or local laws. To be eligible for renewal of aid a student must remain enrolled on 
a normal full-time basis and be in good standing, making satisfactory progress 
toward a degree. The scholarship committee does not award institutional scholar- 
ships to students earning less than a 2.0 grade average on all work attempted at Wake 
Forest. 

Scholarships 

The Guy T. Carswell Scholarships, made possible by and established in honor of 
the late Guy T. Carswell and his wife Mrs. Clara Carswell of Charlotte, North 
Carolina, carry an annual value ranging from a minimum stipend of SI, 000 to a 
maximum stipend of $4,500, with awards for more than $1,000 determined on the basis 
of need. A Carswell Scholar must be a student applying to the College who possesses 
outstanding qualities of intellect and leadership. Up to forty scholars are selected 
annually. 

The George Foster Hankins Scholarships for Freshmen, made possible by the late 
Colonel George Foster Hankins of Lexington, North Carolina for residents of North 
Carolina or children of alumni residing in other states, with preference given to 
residents of Davidson County, North Carolina, have a value up to $4,500. 

The George Foster Hankins Scholarships for I 'pperclassmen for students who have 
been enrolled for at least one semester, with preference given to applicants from 
Davidson County, North Carolina, vary in value according to need. 

The following is a partial list of other available scholarships: 

The Alcoa Foundation Scholarship, donated by the Alcoa Foundation, is available 
to a freshman from the Piedmont area who is majoring in chemistry and is awarded on 
the basis of need for $2,000. 



38 



The Alpha Flu Omega Scholarship, established by the Kappa Theta Chapter of 
Alpha Phi Omega, is made available in alternate years to a freshman who presents 
evidence of need and an excellent high school record for a minimum of $200. 

Basic Educational Opportunity (.rants are available to undergraduate students 
with exceptional financial need who require these grants in order to attend college, for 
a value of from $200 to $1,400 per year. The amount of assistance a student may receive 
depends upon need, taking into ac ( ount financial resources and the cost ol attending 
the college chosen, 

The Eliza Pratt Brown Scholarship, donated by the late Junius Calvin Brown of 
Madison, North Carolina in honor ol his wife Eliza Pratt Brown, is used to assist 
needy, worthy, and deserving students from North Carolina, with preference given to 
students from the town ol Madison and Rockingham County, foi a maximum of 
$2,000. 

The J. ('•. (Unroll Memorial Athletic Scholarship, donated in memory of J. G. 
Carroll, former associate professor ol mathematics, is made to a deserving athlete who 
is not on a regular athletic scholarship, for a value of approximately $100. 

The James Eee Carver Scholarship, donated by Mrs. Jean Freeman Carver with her 
children James Lee Cat vet II and Elizabeth Jeanine Carver in memory of her husband 
James Lee Carver, is for deserving and promising students who demonstrate a need for 
financial assistance, with preference given to students from the Oxford Orphanage, 
lor a value of approximately $300. 

The College Scholarships, in the amount of $100 to $3,000 each, are available to 
freshmen and upperc lassmen presenting satisfactory academic records and evidence of 
need. 

The O. B. Crowell Memorial Scholarship Fund, donated by Mrs. Louis T. Crowell 
of Hendersonville, North Carolina in memory of her husband O. B. Crowell, is 
awarded on the basis of character, need, and promise for a value of approximately 
$600. 

The Lecausey F. and Lula IF Freeman Scholarship, donated by Mr. and Mrs. G. H. 
Singleton of Raleigh, North Carolina in memory of the parents of Mrs. Singleton, is 
available toa freshman, sophomore, or junior whose home is within the West Chowan 
Baptist Association of North Carolina, with preference given to Bertie County 
students, on the basis of need and ability. Residents of the Roanoke Association may be 
considered for the scholarship, which is renewable on the basis of need and ability 
except for the senior year, for a value of approximately $200. 

The James W. dill Scholarship, doirated by Mrs. Ruth R. Gill in memory of her 
husband James W. Gill, provides a scholarship for a deserving student, with 
preference given to students from Montgomery and Prince George Counties, 
Maryland, for a value of approximately $600. 

The Eugene Basil Glover Memorial Scholarship is awarded to an incoming or 
enrolled student based on ability and need, with a slight preference given to students 
from Halifax County, North Carolina. 

The Wallace Barger Goebel Scholarship, made possible through a donation from 
Mrs. Miriam M. Goebel, is based upon ability and financial need, with first preference 
given to a student with an interest in literature, second preference toa student with an 
interest in history, and third preference to a student enrolled in the pre-medical 



39 



program, ioi a value of approximately $400. 

The Fuller Hamrick Scholarship, created under the will of the late Everett C. Snyder 
of Wake Forest, North Carolina in memory of Fuller Hamrick, is used to educate 
students from the Mills Home in I homasville. North Carolina, for a value of 
approximately $550. 

The Frank I\ Hobgood Scholarship, donated by Mrs. Rate H. Hobgood of 
Reidsville, North Carolina in memory oi her husband, is available to those who 
qualify on the basis of character, purpose, intelligence, and need, with preference 
given to those who plan to enter the ministry, do religious work, become teachers, or 
become lawyers, the preference being in the order named, for residents of the 
Reidsville, North Carolina area recommended by the deacons of the First Baptist 
Church of Reidsville, and for a value of $500. 

The Forrest IF Hollifield Scholarship, donated by Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Hollifieldin 
memory of their son Forrest H. Hollifield, is awarded to upperclassmen with evidence 
of character and need, with preference given to natives of Rowan and Rutherford 
Counties, North Carolina and to members of the Delta Nu Chapter of Sigma Chi 
Fraternity. 

The J . Fee Keiger Sr. Scholarship is an academic scholarship awarded annually to a 
North Carolina student, with preference given to students living in the Mid-Carolina 
Telephone Company service region, for a value of $750. 

The Senah C. and C. A. Kent Scholarships, are awarded to freshmen and 
upperclassmen on the basis of leadership, academic merit, and financial need, without 
regard to race, religion, sex, or geographical origin. 

The Kirkpatrick-Hoicell Memorial Scholarship Fund, donated by the Delta Nu 
Chapter of Sigma Chi Fraternity, makes available one or two scholarships, with 
preference given to members of the Sigma Chi Fraternity, upon recommendation of 
the Kirkpatrick-Howell Memorial Scholarship Board, for a value of approximately 



The Marie Dayton McDonald Scholarship, donated by Professor Emeritus of Music 
Thane McDonald and friends in memory of his wife, is available to a deserving and 
qualified music student for a value of approximately $125. 

The Norfleet Scholarships, donated bv Mr. and Mrs. Eustace Norfleet of 
Wilmington, North Carolina in memory of his parents John A. and Mary Pope 
Norfleet, are available to deserving and promising students needing financial 
assistance for a value of $200. 

The North Carolina Scholarships are made available by the North Carolina 
General Assembly and are awarded on the basis of financial need to full-time students 
who are bona fide residents of North Carolina. 

North Carolina Student Incentive Grants are available to undergraduate residents 
of North Carolina with exceptional financial need who require these grants in order to 
attend college, for a value of from $200 to $1,500 per year. The amount of assistance a 
student may receive depends upon need, taking into account financial resources and 
the cost of attending the college chosen. 

The Benjamin Wingate Parham Scholarship, donated by Mrs. Kate J. Parham of 
Oxford, North Carolina in memory of her husband, is awarded on the basis of ability 
and need and may be renewed for succeeding years. 



40 



The Thomas F. Pettus Scholarships, administered by the North Carolina Baptist 
Foundation under the terms of the will of the late Thomas F. Pettus of Wilson County, 
North Carolina, make two or more scholarships available each year in memory of Mr. 
Pettus, and are awarded on the basis of merit and need, with preference given to North 
Carolina Baptist students. 

The William Toms Poteat Scholarship, awarded annually to the graduates of the 
Baptist junior colleges in North Carolina on the basis of need, is renewable for the 
senior year for a value of up to $500. 

The A. M. Pullen and Company Scholarship, granted by the A. M. Pullen and 
Company Certified Public Accountants to an outstanding upper division accounting 
major designated by the accounting faculty on the basis of merit, financial need, and 
interest in public accounting, has a value of $600. 

The Oliver D. and Caroline E. Revell Memorial Scholarship Fund, created under 
the will of the late Oliver D. Revell of Buncombe County, North Carolina is for a 
person preparing for the ministry or full-time religious woik, for a value of $100. 

The Kate B. Reynolds Memorial Scholarships, donated in memory of the late Mrs. 
Kate B. Reynolds, is for residents of Forsyth County, North Carolina who without 
financial aid would be unable to obtain education beyond high school. At least four 
scholarships are awarded, with a value up to $2,400. 

The ROTC Scholarships require applications for four-year scholarships from 
students in their junior and senior year of high school to the nearest ROTC Region 
Headquarters and from freshmen, sophomores, and juniors enrolled in the ROTC 
program to the professor of military science. Each scholarship covers tuition, fees, 
books, and classroom materials for the regular school year, and a subsistence 
allowance of $100 per month for the period that the scholarship is in effect, remaining 
in effect throughout the contract period subject to satisfactory academic and ROTC 
performance. 

The Sigmund Sternberger Scholarships, donated by the Sigmund Sternberger 
Foundation, are for needy North Carolinians, with preference given to undergraduate 
students from Creensboro and Guilford County, for a value of $1,600. 

The J. ]]'. Straughan Scholarsfiip, donated by Misses Mattie, Mable, and Alice 
Straughan in memory of their brother Dr. J. W. Straughan of Warsaw, North 
Carolina, with preference given to students from Duplin County, North Carolina who 
are interested in pursuing a medical career, especially in the field of family practice, 
and for those who need financial assistance to continue their education. 

The Saddye Stephenson and Benjamin Louis Sykes Scholarship, donated by Dr. 
Charles L. Sykes and Dr. Ralph J. Sykes in memory of their father and mother, is 
awarded on the basis of Christian character, academic proficiency, and financial need, 
with preference given to freshmen from North Carolina, renewable for a value of 
approximately $400. 

The Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are available to a limited 
number of undergraduate students with exceptional financial need who require these 
grants to attend college and who show academic or creative promise, for a value from 
$200 to $1,500 a year but no more than one-half of the total assistance given the 
student. The amount of financial assistance a student may receive depends upon need, 
taking into account financial resources and the cost of attending the college chosen. 



The Tyner-Pitman Sc holarship Fund, donated by Mrs. Cora Tyner Pitman, makes 
available at least one scholarship lot needy North Carolina students. 

The Jesse A. Williams Scholarships, created undei the will ol the late Jesse A. 
Williams ol Union County, North Carolina, with preference given to deserving 
students of Union County, have a value up to SI, 200. 

The Charles Littell Wilson Scholarship, treated undei the will ol Mis. Jennie Mayes 
Wilson in memory ol her husband Charles Littell Wilson, is for a freshman, with a 
value (torn $200 to $600. 

The William Luther Wyatt III Si holarship Trust, donated by Mi . and Mi s. William 
I.. Wyatt Jr. of Raleigh, North Carolina in memory of their son William Luther Wyatt 
III, with preference given to a male student entering the junior yeai who has shown an 
interest and an ability in the field of biology, is based on need and ability . loi a value ol 
approximately $500. 

Loans 

The following is a partial list of available loan funds: 

The James F. and Mary '/,. Bryan Foundation Student Loan Plan is for residents of 
North Carolina enrolled lull-time for up to $7,500 for undergraduate study. The 
amount of each loan is determined by the College Foundation, with an interest rate of 
one percent during the in-school and grate periods and seven percent during the 
repayment period. 

The Bushnell Baptist Chun h Loan Fund, established in 1915 with funds supplied 
by the Bushnell Baptist Church ol Fontana Dam, North Carolina, is lor needy 
students. 

The Council Fund, established in 1935 by Mr. C. T. Council of Durham, North 
Carolina, is for the aid of senior students. 

The James IF. Denmark Loan Fund, originated in 1875 by James William Denmark 
of Dudley, North Carolina, is available to qualified students, with preference given to 
students from North Carolina, for an amount not exceeding $1,500 each year and 
$6,000 during the entire period of enrollment. 

The Olnna Dunn Student Loan Fund, established under the will of Miss Birdie 
Dunn of Wake County, North Carolina in memory of her mother, is for worthy 
students. 

The Duplin County Loan Fund, donated in 1942 by anonymous friends of the 
College, is limited to students from Duplin County, North Carolina. 

The Elliott B. Earnshaw Loan Fund, established by the Board of Trustees, is a 
memorial to former Bursar F. B. Earnshaw. 

The Friendly Student Loan Fund, established in 1948 by Miss Nell E. Stinson of 
Raleigh, North Carolina in memory of her sister Mary Belle Stinson Michael, is for the 
benefit of worthy students who need financial aid. 

The George Foster Hankins Loan Fund, established under the will of the late 
Colonel George Poster Hankins of Lexington, North Carolina, gives preference to 
applicants from Davidson County, North Carolina. 

The Harris Memorial Loan Fund, established by the late J. P. Harris of Bethel. 
North Carolina in memory of his first wife Lucy Shearon Harris and his second wife 
Lucy Jones Harris, is for students who have demonstrated ability to apply educational 



11' 



advantages to the rendition oi enriched and greater Christian service in life and who 
require financial assistance in ordei to prevent disruption in then education. 

The Edna Tyner Langston Fund, established in 1912 by Dr. Henry J. Langston of 
Danville, Virginia in memory of his wife, is available to a student agreed upon by the 
donor and the College. 

The National Direct Student Loan Program makes available loans up to $2,500 per 
year for students in need of financial assistance with an interest rate of three percent. 
Examples of typical repayment schedules: 



egate L 


oan 


Q 


uarterly 


Amount oi 


Total Interest 


Total 






p, 


iv merits 


Payment 


Paid 


Payment 


$2,500 






28 


$ 90.00 


$ 269.78 


$2,769,78 


5,000 






40 


125.00 


768.65 


5,768.65 


7,500 






10 


187.50 


1,153.07 


8.653.07 



Aggregate undergraduate sums may not exceed $2,500 for the first two years or 
$5,000 for four years but may be extended to $10,000 for those who also borrow for 
graduate or professional study, with an interest rate of three percent. 

The North Carolina Insured Student Loan Program makes available loans up to 
$2,500 per year for legal residents enrolled full-time. Aggregate undergraduate sums 
may not exceed $7,500 but may be extended to $15,000 for those who also borrow for 
graduate or professional study. The maximum loan each year may not exceed $2,500 
for undergraduates of $5,000 for graduate or professional students. Loans are insured 
by the North Carolina State Education Assistance Authority and are processed by the 
College Foundation; under certain conditions the United States Office of Education 
pays the seven percent interest during the in-school and grace periods. 

The Watts Norton Loan Fund, established in 1949 by Mr. L. Watts Norton of 
Durham, North Carolina, is for worthy students enrolled in the Department of 
Religion who need financial assistance. 

The Powers Fund, established in 1944 by Dr. Frank P. Powers of Raleigh, North 
Carolina in memory of his parents Frank P. and Effie Reade Powers, is for the benefit 
of needy students, with preference given to orphans. 

The Grover and Addy Raby Loan Fund, establishes! in 1945 by Dr. J. G. Raby of 
Tarboro, North Carolina in memory of his parents, gives preference to applicants 
from the First Baptist Church of Tarboro. 

The James F. Slate Loan Fund, established in 1908 by J. F. Slate of Stokes County, 
North Carolina, is available for ministerial students who have been licensed to preach. 

Concessions 

The following concessions are granted for qualified undergraduate students: 
Ministerial students receive a $600 concession per year if they (1) have a written 
recommendation or license to preach from their own church body and (2) agree to 
repay the total amount, plus four percent interest, in the event that they do not serve 
five years in the pastoral ministry within twelve years of attendance in the College. 
Children and spouses of pastors of North Carolina Baptist churches receive a $600 
concession per year if they are the children or spouses of ( 1 ) ministers. (2) missionaries 



1.", 



of the Southern Baptist Foreign Mission Board, (3) officials of the North Carolina 
Baptist State Convention, or (4) professors in North Carolina Baptist colleges or 
universities. Pastors themselves are also eligible. 

Children of other ministers who are not eligible for the above concession receive a 
$150 concession per year if their parent makes a living chiefly by the ministry and they 
have a demonstrated need. 

Rehabilitation students receive a concession up to $300 per year if they (1) have the 
letter of approval from the North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and 
(2) file for the concession. 

Other Financial Aid 

The following is a partial list of other sources of financial aid: 

The College Work /Study Program On Campus makes available on-campus 
employment to students who show evidence of financial need. Students work during 
the academic year for campus minimum wage or above, at an average of ten to fifteen 
hours per week, in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, Reynolda Hall, College Union, 
Reynolda Gardens, and other places on campus. 

The College Work /Study Program Off Campus (PACT) is for students who show 
evidence of financial need for work in any non-profit public or private institution for 
periods up to fifteen weeks during the summer, and forty hours per week, at an hourly 
wage. Eighty percent of earnings should be retained for college expenses. Summer 
employment is also available for students who show evidence of need and who are 
unable to secure adequate employment on their own. (Interested students should 
apply before March 15.) 

The German Exchange Scholarship, established in 1959 with the Free University of 
Berlin, is available to a student with at least two years of college German or the 
equivalent who has junior standing by the end of the semester in which application is 
made and who, with the permission of the chairman of the department concerned, 
need not be a German major. It provides 500 German marks per month for ten months, 
remission of fees, 200 marks per semester for books, and free accommodations or a 
living allowance of up to 150 marks per month. (Interested students should 
communicate with the chairman of the Department of German.) 

The Spanish Exchange Scholarship, established in 1964 with the University of the 
Andes in Bogota, Columbia, is available to two students for one semester's study each 
or one student for two semesters with at least two years of college Spanish or the 
equivalent. It provides remission of fees, the cost of books, and the cost of board and 
accommodations. (Interested students should communicate with the chairman of the 
Department of Romance Languages.) 

The French Exchange Scholarship, established in 1971 with the diversity of 
Orleans, France, is available to a graduating senior, who receives a graduate teaching 
assistantship at the University of Orleans for two semesters. (Interested students 
should communicate with the chairman of the Department of Romance Languages.) 

The Ministerial Aid Fund, established in 1897 by the estate of J. A. Melke, is 
available to pre-ministerial students on a loan or grant program on the basis of merit 
and need, and particularly in the case of grants, academic achievement. 



11 



Church Choir Work Grants, given by the College and Wake Forest Baptist Church 
to encourage outstanding music students, are awarded on the basis of talent, 
reliability, and interest in the Church on the recommendation of the music committee 
of the Church and the Department of Music, for the value of $300. (Interested students 
should communicate with the chairman ol the Department ol Music.) 

Student Student Spouse Employment is possible for part-time, on-campus and 
off-campus work, for a recommended maximum of twenty hours per week for full- 
time students. Summer employment may also be available. (Interested students should 
communicate with the Office of Placement and Career Development.) 

Veteran Benefits are administered by the Office of the Veterans Administration in 
the Wachovia Building at 251 North Main Street in Winston-Salem. 




15 



Special Programs 



For students of special ability or interests and for students who can take advantage of 
off -campus study opportunities, the College offers a variety of programs ranging from 
four-week courses to four-year curricula. These are in addition to combined courses of 
study in departments in the College and the pre-professional curricula described in 
this bulletin. 

Honors Study 

For highly qualified students, a series of interdisciplinary honors courses are offered 
as described under Courses of Instruction. Under the Coordinator of the Honors 
Program, students participate in three or more honors seminars during the freshman, 
sophomore, and junior years. Those who complete four seminars with a superior 
record and who are not candidates for departmental honors may complete a final 
directed study course. With a superior record in that course and a grade point average 
of 3.0 in all work, they may be graduated with "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." 

For students especially talented in individual areas of study, most departments in 
the College offer special studies leading to graduation with honors in a particular 
department. The minimum requirement is a grade point average of 3.0 in all work and 
3.3 (or higher in some areas) in the major. Other course, seminar, and research 
requirements vary according to the department concerned. 

Open Curriculum 

For students with high motivation and strong academic preparation, the Open 
Curriculum provides the opportunity to follow a course of study planned within the 
framework of a liberal arts education but not necessarily fulfilling all basic and 
divisional requirements for the degree. Under the Committee on Open Curriculum a 
limited number of students are selected before or during the freshman year by previous 
record of achievement, high aspirations, ability in one or more areas of study, strength 
of self-expression, and other special talents. The course of study for the degree is 
designed by the student with the approval of one or more members of the faculty. 

Residential Language Centers 

For students prepared to speak French or Spanish on a regular basis with other 
students studying the same language, the Craylyn Estate near campus is the site of two 
residential centers. Under a faculty coordinator from the Department of Romance 
Languages, approximately twenty students live for one or more semesters at Bernard 
Cottage (for French) or Amos Cottage (for Spanish), attending regular classes on 
campus but speaking French or Spanish in the residence cottages. 

Study at Salem College 

For full-time students, Wake Forest and Salem College share a program of exchange 
credits for courses taken at one institution because not offered at the other. An 
application must be approved by the academic adviser and the Dean of the College. 



46 



Except in courses of private instruction, there is no additional cost to the student. 
Grades and grade points earned at Salem College are evaluated as if they were earned at 
Wake Forest. 

Summer Study 

For full-time students, courses taken in the summer at another college or university 
require the advance approval of the chairman of the department concerned and the 
Registrar. Grades earned elsewhere are not used in computing the grade averages; 
those earned elsewhere on the semester-hour plan are computed as transfer credit at 
3.37 credits for three approved semester hours taken elsewhere. 

In addition to regular courses, a number of special programs for credit are available 
at Wake Forest in the summer. (See the bulletin of the summer session.) 

January Study 

For students who wish to follow individual or non-traditional courses of study on 
campus or field study in places like Honduras, Russia, and Switzerland, the January 
term offers a number of four-credit courses, many on a Pass/Fail basis. Sonte January 
term courses are offered regularly and are described under Courses of Instruction. 
Others are offered only once or intermittently and are not shown in this bulletin. 
(Students may elect to be graded Pass/Fail only if the January term course is not used 
to fulfill basic, divisional, or major requirements.) 

Opportunities for Study Abroad 

London and Venice 

For students who can spend one semester at a University residential center abroad, 
regular instruction is offered in London and in Venice. Under various members of the 
faculty, courses of study designed for the culture of the city and country are offered 
each semester for a full academic load. (Written approval is necessary for fulfilling 
basic, divisional, or major course requirements, and language preparation in Italian is 
desirable for Venice.) In Venice, approximately twenty students live and study each 
semester at Casa Artom, the University house on the Grand Canal. In London, a 
slightly smaller group resides at the newly acquired Worrell House. 

France 

For students wishing to study in France, arrangements are made for a semester's 
instruction at the University of Dijon. Students are placed in courses according to the 
level of their ability in French as ascertained by examination in Dijon. Under a faculty 
residential adviser from the Department of Romance Languages, courses are taken at 
the University of Dijon by student groups of varying size and levels of preparation. (A 
major in French is not required, but French 221 or its equivalent is recommended.) 



47 



Spain 

For students wishing to study in Spain, arrangements are made for a semester's 
instruction at the University of Salamanca. Under a faculty residential advisei from 
the Department of Romance Languages or the program's resident director in Sala- 
manca, courses are taken at the University of Salamanca by student groups of varying 
size and levels of preparation. (A major in Spanish is not required, but Spanish 221 or 
its equivalent is recommended.) 

India 

For students who can spend a semester in India, arrangements are made lor 
instruction in an Indian college or university and travel in the country for a period of 
about three months. (Written approval is necessary for fulfilling basic , divisional, or 
major requirements.) 

Independent Study 

For students who wish to spend one or more semesters in an approved college or 
university abroad, arrangements must be made with the chairman ol the department 
of the major and the Dean ol the College, An approved application for study abroad 
must also be filed with the Registrar. I'p to thirty-six credits foi a lull-year program 
may be granted by the College upon satisfactory evaluation of the work taken, but is 
not guaranteed. Students not on a College program must apply for readmission to the 
University. Credit is computed as transfer credit at 3.375 credits for three approved 
semester hours taken abroad. 

In addition, the Independent Study Program of the Experiment in International 
Living is recognized by the College. To participate in this program a student must be 
regularly enrolled and plan to return to the College after study abroad, and 
arrangements must be made with the chairman of the department of the major and the 
Dean of the College, lip to fourteen credits for a one-semester program may be granted 
upon evidence of satisfactory completion of work taken, but is subject to evaluation by 
the College. 




48 



Requirements for Degrees 



Degrees Offered 

The College offers undergraduate programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science degrees. The Bachelor of Arts degree is conferred with majors in 
anthropology, art, biology, chemistry, classical studies, economics, English, French, 
German, Greek, history, Latin, music, philosophy, physics, politics, psychology, 
religion, Romance languages, sociology, Spanish, and speech communication and 
theatre arts. The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred with majors in accountancy, 
business, chemistry, mathematical economics, mathematics, mathematics-biology, 
mathematics-business, physical education, and physics. The Bachelor of Arts degree is 
available with a major in intermediate education or education with a state teacher's 
certificate in social studies. The Bachelor of Science degree is available with a major in 
education with a state teacher's certificate in science, and in combined curricula in 
dentistry, engineering, forestry, medical sciences, medical technology, and the 
physician assistant program. (For a description of the programs of the various 
departments see Courses of Instruction.) 

A student who receives the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree from the 
College may not thereafter receive the other of the two degrees. 

General Requirements 

Students in the College have considerable flexibility in planning their course of 
study. Except for two semesters of required physical education, only three specific 
courses are required, one in English composition and two in a foreign language. To 
complete preparation for more specialized work in a major field or fields, students 
select three courses in each of four divisions of the undergraduate curriculum: (1) 
literature and the arts; (2) the natural sciences and mathematics; (3) history, religion, 
and philosophy; and (4) the social and behavioral sciences. Normally the basic and 
divisional requirements are completed in the freshman and sophomore years and 
requirements in the field or fields of the major are completed in the junior and senior 
years. 

All students must complete (1) the basic and divisional requirements (unless 
accepted for the Open Curriculum), (2) a course of study approved by the department 
or departments of the major, and (3) elective courses for a total of 144 credits. No more 
than sixteen credits toward graduation may be earned in Military Science 111, 112, 151, 
152,211,212,251,252; Music 107-120 (ensemble courses); and physical education 100- 
level courses other than the physical education requirement. 

All students must earn a C average on all courses attempted. A student who transfers 
from another college or university must earn a C average on all courses attempted in 
the College and a C average on all work attempted at all colleges and universities. Of 
the 144 credits required for graduation, at least seventy-two must be completed in the 
College, including the work of the senior year (except for combined degree curricula). 

A student has the privilege of graduating under the requirements of the bulletin in 
which he or she enters, provided that course work is completed within six years of 



49 



entrance. Alter six years, the student must fulfil] the requirements for the class in 
which he or she graduates. 

Basic Requirements 

All students must complete three required basic courses (unless waived through 
procedures established by the departments concerned): 

English 110 (composition) or 112 (composition and literature) 
Foreign language 153 (intermediate level) 
Foreign language (literature) 

French 215, 216, 217, or the equivalent 

Spanish 215, 216, or the equivalent 

Italian 215, 216, or the equivalent 

German 211 or 212 

Russian (any literature course) 

Greek 211 or 212 

Latin 211, 212, or 216 

Hebrew 211 

Hindi 211 

Divisional Requirements 

All students must complete three courses in each of the four divisions ol the 
undergraduate curriculum (unless exempted by completion of Advanced Placement 
requirements): 

/. Literature and the Arts (three courses; no more than one course from each group) 

1. English literature (English 160 or 165) 

2. American literature (English 170 or 175) 

3. Foieign literature (other than the one used for the basic requirement) 

a. Classical languages 

Greek 21 1, 212, 231, 241, or 242 
Latin 212. 216, 221. 225, or 226 
Classics 253, 254, 263, 264, 265, or 272 

b. German 211 or 212 

c. Romance languages (French, Spanish, or Russian literature) 

d. Humanities 213, 214, 215, 216, or 217 

4. Fine Arts 

a. Art 103 

b. Music 101 

c. Theatre Arts 121 

//. The Natural Seienees and Mathematics (three courses, selected from only two 
groups) 

1. Biology 111. 150. or 151 

2. Chemistry 111, 112 (unless advanced preparation indicates a higher course) 

3. Physics 1 1 1 and 1 12 (one or both courses); 121 and 122 (one or both courses) 

4. Mathematics 111, 112, 115, 116. 157 (any one; if two, any pair other than 
111-116 and 115-157) 



50 



///. History, Religion, and Philosophy (three courses; no more than one course 
from each group) 

1. History 111, 112, 1 13, 215, 216, 221 , 341, 342, 345, 346, 349, or 350 

2. Religion (any course other than 218, 225. 237, 239, 240. 265, 266. 270. 273, 282, 
286, 287, 292, 346, and 362) 

3. Philosophy 151, 171, or 172 

I] ' . The Social and BeJiavioral Sciences (three courses; no more than one from any 
department) 

1. Anthropology 162 

2. Economics 111, or 151, or 152 

3. Politics 113, or 114, or 115 

4. Psychology 151 

5. Sociology 151 

Physical Education Requirement 

All students must complete Physical Education 111 and one additional course 
selected from the 100-series of physical education courses. 

Completion of Lower Division Requirements 

Basic, divisional, and physical education requirements should be completed where 
possible by the end of the sophomore year. For students who postpone required 
courses until the junior year to complete early major courses, a minimum of three 
required courses must be taken each semester until the requirements have been 
completed. Except for students accepted for the Open Curriculum, no course 
requirements may be waived or replaced by substitutes except through regular 
procedures established by the faculty or through a specific vote of the faculty in regular 
session. 

Admission to the Upper Division 

Before applying for admission to the upper division and beginning work on the 
major subject, a student should have seventy-two credits and 144 grade points in the 
lower division. In no case is a student admitted to the upper division with fewer than 
sixty credits and 120 grade points. 

All students at the end of the sophomore year or at the beginning of the junior year 
are required to pass a proficiency test in the use of the English language. 

Fields of Study in the Upper Division 

Thirty days before the end of the sophomore year each student is required to indicate 
to the Registrar and to the department or departments concerned the selection of a 
major subject for concentration during the junior and senior years. Before this 
selection is formally approved by the Registrar the student must present a written 
statement from the authorized representative of the department or departments 
indicating that the student has been accepted as a candidate for the major in that 
department. An adviser is available to assist the student in planning a course of study 



M 



for the junioi and senior years. A department whi< h rejec ts a student as a majoi must 
file with the Dean of the College a written statement including the reason(s) for the 
rejection. 

The College makes a reasonable effort to provide ample space in the various major 
fields to accommodate the interests of students. It must he understood, however, that 
the College cannot undertake to guarantee the availability of space in a given major 
field or a given course, since the preferences of students may vary and there are limits to 
both faculty and facilities. 

After the beginning of the junior year a student may not change from one major to 
another without the approval of the departments concerned. The student's course of 
study for the junioi and senior years includes tin minimum requirements for the 
departmental major, with other courses selected by the student and approved by the 
adviser. (For specific course requirements in the various fields of study, see Courses of 
Instruction.) 

At least half of the majoi must he c ompleted in the College. Students preparing for 
the ministry are advised toelec t three c ourses in religion beyond the course included in 
the divisional requirements. 

The following fields of study are recognized foi the major: accountancy. 
anthropology, art, biology, business, chemistry, classical studies, economics, 
education. English, French, German. Greek, history, Latin, mathematical economics, 
mathematics, mathematics-biology, mathematics-business, music, philosophy, 
physical education, physics, politics, psychology, religion. Romance languages, 
sociology, Spanish, and speech communication and theatre arts. 

Maximum Number of Courses in a Department 

A maximum of forty-eight ci edits in a single field of study is allowed within the 144 
credits required for graduation. This excludes required related courses from other 
departments. 

For dual major departments, fifty-six credits toward graduation are allowed in any 
department authorized to offer two fields of study. Elementary foreign language in the 
major field of stuck and Ac c ountanc \ 1 1 1-1 12 (for those majoring in accountancy) are 
excluded. 

These limits may only he exceeded in unusual c ircumstances by action of the Dean 
of the College. 

Double Majors and Joint Majors 

A student may major in two departments with the written permission of the 
chairman of each of the departments and on condition that the student meets all 
requirements for the major in both departments. For administrative purposes, the 
student must designate one of the two fields as the primary major, which appears 
first on the student's record. 

A joint major consisting of fifty-six credits in two departments is available in 
classical studies, mathematical economics, mathematics-biology, mathematics- 
business, and Romance languages. 



52 



Senior Testing 

All seniors are required to participate in a testing program designed to provide 
objective evidence of educational development and employing measures of academic 
achievement such as selected portions of the Graduate Record Examination and/or 
other tests deemed appropriate by the Committee on Academic Affairs. The tests are 
administered during the spring semester, and relevant results are made available to the 
student for his or her information. The primary purpose of the program is to provide 
the College with information for assessing the total educational process. The program 
does not supplant the regular administration of the Graduate Record Examination for 
those students applying for admission to graduate school. 

Combined Degrees in the School of Law 

A combined course makes it possible for a student to receive the two degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Juris Doctor in six academic years or their equivalent instead of 
the usual seven years. The first three years of the combined course are in the College 
and the last three are in the School of Law. 

A student pursuing this plan must (1) complete the basic and divisional course 
requirements and become qualified for admission to the upper division; (2) initiate an 
application for admission to the School of Law and secure through the law school 
adviser, who is a member of the law faculty, permission to pursue the combined course 
plan (admission to the School of Law is based on the applicant's entire undergraduate 
record, Law School Admission Test scores, and other criteria, and permission to 
pursue the combined degree program does not constitute admission to the School of 
Law); (3) perform the junior year of study in the College under the supervision of the 
law school adviser; and (4) complete at least 1 10 credits in the College with a minimum 
average of C and the first full year of law in the School of Law with an average 
sufficient to remain in the School of Law. 

The last year of required college academic work must be taken in the College. A 
student who transfers from another college or university at the end of the first or 
second year must maintain a minimum average grade of C on all academic work 
undertaken in the College. 

A student who completes the program successfully is eligible to receive the Bachelor 
of Arts degree at the end of the first full year in the School of Law; the Juris Doctor 
degree is awarded the student who, having received the B.A. degree, also fulfills 
requirements for the J.D. degree. The quantitative and qualitative academic 
requirements set forth herein are minimum requirements for the sucessful completion 
of the combined degree program; satisfying the requirements of the three-year pro- 
gram in the College does not necessarily entitle an applicant to admission to the 
School of Law. 

Combined Degrees in Medical Sciences 

A limited number of students may receive a Bachelor of Science degree with a major 
in medical sciences. 

Under this plan the student fulfills the requirements for the degree by completing 



53 



three years of work in the College with a minimum average grade of C and by 
satisfactorily completing the first full year of medicine (at least thirty semester hours) 
as outlined by the faculty of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, with a record 
entitling promotion to the second year class. At least one year (thirty-six credits) of the 
required academic work must be completed in the College. 

Candidates for the B.S. degree with a major in medical sciences must complete 
before entering the School of Medicine for the fourth year of work the basic course 
requirements; the divisional course requirements in Divisions I, III, and IV; the 
physical education requirement; Biology 111, 150, 151 (two courses); Biology 312, 320, 
321, 326, 351, 360, 370 (two courses); Chemistry 1 1 1 and 112; Chemistry 221 and 222; 
Physics 111 and 1 12; mathematics (one course); and electives for a total of 108 credits. 

The completion of the prescribed academic subjects does not necessarily admit any 
student to the School of Medicine. (All other factors being equal, applicants who have 
done all their work in the College are given preference.) 

Combined Degrees in Medical Technology 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in medical technology by 
completion of the academic requirements outlined below and by satisfactory 
completion of the full program in medical technology offered by the Division of Allied 
Health Programs of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine with at least a grade of C in 
all courses taken in the program in medical technology. At least one year (thirty-six 
credits) of the required academic work must be completed in the College. Students 
seeking admission to the program must file application in the fall of their junior year 
with the Division of Allied Health Programs of the School of Medicine. A B average is 
usually required in biology and chemistry for admission to the program. Students 
must complete the basic course requirements; the divisional course requirements in 
Divisions I, III, and IV; the physical education requirement; Biology 111, 150, 151 
(three courses); Biology 326; Chemistry 111 and 112; Chemistry 221 and 222; 
mathematics (one course); and electives for a total of 108 credits. 

Degrees in the Physician Assistant Program 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in the physician assistant 
program by completion of three years (108 credits) in the College with a minimum 
average grade of C, and by satisfactory completion of the full twenty-four month 
course in the physician assistant program offered by the Division of Allied Health 
Programs of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. At least one year (thirty-six 
credits) of the required academic work must be completed in the College. Candidates 
for the degree must complete the basic course requirements, the divisional course 
requirements, and the physical education requirement; at least four courses in 
biology (including one course in microbiology); and at least four courses in the social 
sciences (sociology, psychology, and economics are recommended). A course in 
statistics and three or four courses in chemistrv are also recommended. 



VI 



Degrees in Microbiology 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in microbiology by 
completion of three years (1 12 credits) in the College with a minimum average grade of 
C, and by satisfactory completion of a thirty-two hour major in microbiology in the 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine. At least one year (thirty-six credits) of the required 
academic work must be completed in the College. Candidates for the degree must 
complete the basic course requirements, the divisional course requirements, and the 
physical education requirement; Microbiology 301, 302, 308, 311, and 312, and 
Biology 370 (in some cases Biology 326 may be substituted for Microbiology 301 ); two 
additional courses from Microbiology 309. 310, 313, and 311; and Biology 321. 
Required related courses are two courses in physics and at least two courses in organic 
chemistry. Additional chemistry and mathematics courses may be suggested by the 
major adviser for students progressing toward advanced work in microbiology. 

Degrees in Dentistry 

A student may fulfill the requirements for a Bachelor of Science degree with a major 
in dentistry by completing three years of work in the College with a minimum average 
grade of C, and by satisfactorily completing the first two years of work in one of certain 
approved dental schools designated by the University, with a record entitling 
advancement to the third year class. 

For this degree the requirements in the College are the same as those for the B.S. 
degree with a major in medical sciences. 

Degrees in Engineering 

The College cooperates with North Carolina State University in offering a broad 
course of study in the arts and sciences combined with specialized training in 
engineering. A program for outstanding students covers five years of study, including 
three initial years in the College and two full years of technical training in one of the 
fields of engineering. (Depending upon the field chosen, it may be advisable for a 
student to attend the summer session in the engineering school after transfer.) Upon 
successful completion of the five years of study the student receives the degree of 
Bachelor of Science from the University and the degree of Bachelor of Science in one of 
the specialized engineering fields from North Carolina State University. 

The curriculum for the first three years must include the basic and divisional 
requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree. Suggested courses for the freshman 
year are English 1 10 and 160 (or a foreign literature); foreign language courses 21 1, 
215,01 216; Mathematics 111-112; Physics 11 1-1 12 or 121-122; and Physical Education 
111-112. Suggested courses for the sophomore year are English 170 (or a foreign 
literature); Philosophy 151; Mathematics 251; Physics 141, 161, and 162; and Chemis- 
try 111 (or 118) and 1 12. Suggested courses for the junior year are a history course, a 
religion course, Mathematics 311, and Economics 151-152. 

This rigorous curriculum demands special aptitude in science and mathematics. 
Electives are chosen in consultation with the engineering adviser in the Department of 
Phvsics. 



55 



Degrees in Forestry 

The College cooperates with Duke University in offering an academic forestry 
training program. A student in this program devotes three years to study in the 
College, where at least two years (seventy-two credits) must be completed. The summer 
between the junior and senior years and the two following years are spent in the Duke 
University School of Forestry. Upon successfully completing the five years of study the 
student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science from the University and the degree 
of Master of Forestry from Duke University. 

Since details of the foresty program are subject to revision in the near future, 
interested students should consult the adviser for the program in the Department of 
Biology. 




56 

Courses of Instruction 

Plans of study, course descriptions, and the ^identification of instructors apply to 
the academic year 1977-78, unless otherwise noted, and reflect official faculty action 
through February 13, 1978. 

The University reserves the right to change programs of .study, academic 
requirements, assignment of lecturers, or the announced calendar without prior 
notice. 

Odd-numbered courses are normally taught in the fall, even-numbered in the 
spring. Exceptions are noted after course descriptions. Number of credits is shown by 
numerals immediately after the course title — for example, (3) or (3,3). The symbols 
P — and C — followed by course numbers or titles are used to show prerequisites and 
corequisites in the department. 

Courses 101-199 are primarily for freshmen and sophomores; courses 200-299 are 
primarily for juniors and seniors; courses 301-399 are for advanced undergraduates 
and graduate students. (For other graduate courses see the bulletin of the Graduate 
School.) The prefix S shows that a course is offered only in the summer. Only some 
courses offered in January are described. 

Anthropology 

Stanton K. Tefft, Chairman 

Professor E. Pendleton Banks 

Associate Professors David K. Evans, Stanton K. Tefft, J. Ned Woodall 

Assistant Professor David S. Weaver 

A major in anthropology requires a minimum of thirty-six credits and must include 
Anthropology 162, 340, 351, 380, and either 356 or 359. Majors are strongly urged to 
take 340 prior to other 300-level courses. 

Students are encouraged but not required to enroll in a course offering intensive 
field research training. However, only four credits from Anthropology 381-382 and 
four credits from Anthropology 383-384 may be used to meet major requirements. 
Additional courses are counted within the limits specified for a single field of study. 

To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Anthropology" highly qualified 
majors are invited to apply to the Department for admission to the honors program. 
They must complete a senior research project, document their research, and 
satisfactorily defend then work in an oral examination. For additional information 
members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

162. General Anthropology. (3 or 4) Basic concepts of anthropology, focusing on the 
biological and sociocultural evolution of man from Pleistocene to the present and an 
analysis of contemporary cultural diversity. 

207. Mountain Folklore in North Carolina. (4) The role folklore plays in all human 
cultures in general and in the culture of the mountain people of Western North 
Carolina in particular. Field trips to mountain counties conducted. Usually offered 

in January. 



260. Archeological Laboratory Practicum. (2) Instruction in artifact cleaning, 
preserving, cataloging, and analysis; preparation of museum exhibits; familiarization 
with darkroom procedures; drafting and report preparation. P-Permission of the 
instructor. 

261. Cultural Anthropology Practicum. (2) Directed in-depth experience in cultural 
anthropology. P- Anthropology 162. 

262. Physical Anthropology Practicum. (2) Practical experience in current problems 
in physical anthropology. P-Anthropology 162. 

301. Archeology of the Carolina Piedmont. (4) Readings and field research directed 
toward collecting and interpreting data on the prehistoric and early historic cultures 
of Piedmont North Carolina. Usually offered in January. P-Permission of the 
instructor. 

303. None of Your Business. (3) This course looks at the rede of secrecy in society in 
both historical and cross-cultural perspective. The form and function of both tribal 
and modern secret organizations (secret services, revolutionary groups, and so forth) 
are studied. The adaptive and maladaptive consequences of secrecy are explored. 
Usually offered in January. P-Anthropology 162. 

305. Conflict and Change on Roatan Island (Honduras). (4) Readings and field 
research focusing upon the barriers and processes of sociocultural and technological 
change in a heterogeneous island community. Usually offered in January. P- 
Anthropology 162 and permission of the instructor. 

307. Archeology of Meso-America. (4) A travel course to major archeological ruins in 
Central and Southern Mexico, the National Museum in Mexico City, and possibly 
certain Guatemalan sites. Offered in January. 

308. Yugoslavia: Crossroads of Cultures. (4) Field study of the people and cultures of 
Yugoslavia. Visits to lour major cities located in three different regions provide 
opportunities to study museum collections and cultural monuments ranging from 
Paleolithic to Roman to Turkish times. Reading, lectures, and informal discussions 
with Yugoslav scholars supplement the field work. Usually offered in January. P- 
Permission of the instructor. 

340. Images of Man: Perspectives on Anthropological Thought. (3 or 4) A study and 
evaluation of the major anthropological theories of man and society, including 
cultural evolutionism, historical particularism, functionalist!!, structuralism, 
cultural ecology, and cultural materialism. The relevance and significance of these 
theories to modern anthropology discussed. P-Permission of the instructor. 

341. Cultural Anthropology. (3 or 4) A cross-cultural analysis of human institutions 
concentrating on non-industrial societies. P-Anthropology 162. 

342. People and Cultures of Latin America. (3 or 4) Ethnographic focus con the ele- 
ments and processes of contemporary Latin American cultures. P-Anthropology 162 
or permission of the instructor. 

343. Anthropology and Developing Nations. (3 or 4) Analytic survey of problems 
facing emerging nations and the application of anthropology in culture-change 
programs. P-Anthropology 162 or permission of the instructor. 



344. Medical Anthropology. (3 or 4) The impact of Western medical practices and 
theory on non-Western cultures and anthropological contributions to the solving of 
world health problems. P- Anthropology 162. 

351. Bioanthropology. (3 or 4) Introduction to biological (physical) anthropology; 
human biology, evolution, and variability. P -Anthropology 162. 

352. Laboratory Methods in Physical Anthropology. (1) Basic methods utilized by 
physical anthropologists to gather data, such as blood grouping, measurement, 
dermatoglyphics, and dental casting. Lab-two hours. P-Permission of the instructor. 

353. Peoples and Cultures of Africa. (3 or 4) The ethnology and prehistory of Negro 
Africa south of the Sahara. P-Anthropology 162. 

354. Primitive Religion. (3 or 4) The worldview and values of nonliterate cultures as 
expressed in myths, rituals, and symbols. P-Anthropology 162 or Sociology 151. 

355. Language and Culture. (3 or 4) An introduction to the relations between language 
and culture, including methods for field research. P-Anthropology 162. 

356. Old World Prehistory. (3 or 4) Introduction to prehistoric archeology; field and 
laboratory techniques, with a survey of world prehistory. P-Anthropology 162. 

357. Personality in Culture. (3 or 4) A seminar designed to study the psychodynamics 
of social personality and national character. P-Anthropologv 162 or Sociology 151. 

358. The American Indian. (3 or 4) Ethnology and prehistory of the American Indian. 
P-Anthropology 162. 

359. Prehistory of North America. (3 or 4) The development of culture in North 
America as outlined by archeological research, with an emphasis on paleoecology and 
sociocultural processes. P-Anthropology 162. 

360. Archeology of the Southeastern United States. (3 or 4) A study of human 
adaptation in the Southeast from the Pleistocene to the present, emphasizing the role 
of ecological factors in determining the formal aspects of culture. P-Anthropology 
162. 

362. Seminar: Human Ecology and Geography. (3 or 4) The relations between man 
and the inorganic and organic environments as mediated by culture. P-Anthropology 
162 or permission of the instructor. 

364. Human Osteology. (3 or 4) A survey of human skeletal anatomy and analysis, 
emphasizing archeological and anthropological applications. P-Permission of the 
instructor. 

365. Field Research in Physical Anthropology. (2, 3, or 4) Training in techniques for 
the study of problems of physical anthropology, carried out in the field. Usually 
offered in January or in the summer. P-Permission of the instructor. 

366. Primates and Fossil Man. (3 or 4) Investigation of primate and human evolution, 
both in anatomy and behavior. P-Anthropology 162 or permission of the instructor. 

371. European Peasant Communities. (3 or 4) Lectures, reading, and discussion on 
selected communities and their sociocultural context, including folklore, folk art, and 
processes of culture change. P-Anthropology 162 or permission of the instructor. 



59 



379. Research Methods in Anthropology. (3 or 4) Introduction to the principle 
research techniques used in anthropology. P- Anthropology 162. 

380. Anthropological Statistics. (3 or 4) Basic statistics, emphasizing application in 
anthropological research. (A student who receives credit for this course may not also 
receive credit for Business 201 [formerly 268] or Mathematics 157 or Sociology 380.) 

381. 382. Archeological Research. (4, 4) The recovery of anthropological data through 
the use of archeology, taught in the excavation and interpretation of a prehistoric site. 
P -Anthropology 162. 

383, 384. Field Research in Cultural Anthropology. (4, 4) Training in techniques for 
the study of foreign cultures, carried out in the field. P- Anthropology 162. 

385, 386. Special Problems Seminar. (3 or 4) Intensive investigation of current 

scientific research within the discipline which concentrates on problems ol 
contemporary interest. P-Permission of the instructor. 

387. Advanced Statistical Analysis in Anthropology. (3 or 4 ) Pi inc iples ol multivariate 
statistical analysis and applications to anthropological problems. P -Anthropology 

380. 

398-399. Independent Study. (1, 2, 3, oi 4) A reading, research, oi internship course 
designed to meet the needs and interests of selected students, to be can ied out under the 
supervision of a departmental faculty member. 

Art 

Sterling M. Boyd, Chairman 

Associate Professor Sterling M. Boyd 

Assistant Professors Robert Knott, Brian Legakis 

Lecturer Marvin S. Coats 

Instructors Gary A. Cook, Andrew W. Polk III 

The major in art requires forty credits in art history and in studio art courses. A 
student normally concentrates in either art history or studio art, but takes courses in 
both areas. 

One foreign language is required of all majors. Students who plan to pursue 
graduate work in art history should have a reading knowledge of two languages 
(German and either French or Italian). 

Any student interested in majoring in art should consult the chairman of the 
department as soon as possible after entering the University. 

Art History* 

103. Introduction to the Visual Arts. (4) An introduction to the arts of various cultures 
and times, with discussions of technique, style, methodology, and terms. May be used 
to satisfy a requirement in Division I. 

221. Indian Art. (4) A survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture from earliest 



*Open to qualified freshmen and sophomores 



60 



times to 1200 A.D. 

224. Oriental Art. (4) A survey of the architecture, painting, and sculpture of China 
and Japan from the prehistoric period to 1900. 

225. Primitive Art. (4) A survey of the traditional arts of Africa south of the Sahara, 
Polynesia, New Guinea, Australia, Pre-Columbian Central and South America, and 
North America. 

227. Art of the Ancient Near East. (4) A survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture 
of Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Anatolia, with an introduction to prehistoric European 
art. 

228. Egyptian Art. (4) The art and architecture of ancient Egypt from the predynastic 
period through Roman Egypt. Usually offered in January. 

230. African Art. (4) The traditional arts of Africa south of the Sahara. 

231. American Art. (4) A survey of American painting from 1600 to 1900. 

233. American Architecture. (4) A survey of American architecture from 1600 to 1900, 
with emphasis on the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. 

241. Ancient Art. (4) A survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture from the 
prehistoric through the late Roman periods. 

242. Minoan and Mycenaean Art. (4) A survey of the architecture, painting, and 
sculpture of the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations. 

244. Greek Art. (3) A survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture from the 
prehistoric through the Hellenistic periods. 

245. Roman Art. (3) A survey of Etruscan and Roman architecture, painting, and 
sculpture. 

246. Greek and Roman Architecture. (4) A survey of Classical architecture, from the 
Archaic Greek through the late Roman periods. 

247. Myth and Legend in Classical Art. (4) A study of the major myths and legends in 
Greek and Roman painting and sculpture. 

248. The Ancient City. (4) An architectural approach to the emergence of civilization 
and urbanism in the ancient world. 

250. Twentieth Century American Art and Literature. (4) An exploration of the ideas, 
values, and feelings found in the art and literature of twentieth century figures such as 
Kandinsky, Stevens, Picasso, and Kafka. 

252. Medieval Art. (4) A survey of painting and sculpture in Europe from 400 to 1400. 

256. History of Books and Printing. (2) An examination of the development of the 
book from the invention of printing to the present. 

267. European Art of the Early Renaissance. (4) A survey of painting and sculpture in 
Italy and Northern Europe from 1300 to 1500, includingartists such as Giotto, Jan van 
Eyck, Roger van der Weyden, Botticelli, and Leonardo da Vinci. 

268. European Renaissance Art of the Sixteenth Century. (4) A survey of painting and 



6] 



sculpture in Italy and Northern Europe from 1500 to 1600. P-Art 267 is recommended. 

2712. Studies in French Art (3). Lectures and field trips in French painting, sculpture, 

and architecture, concentrating on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Offered in 

Dijon. 

272. Baroque Art. (4) A survey of European painting and sculpture from 1600 to 1700. 

281. Modern Art to 1900. (4) A survey of European painting and sculpture from 1700 
to 1900, emphasizing the nineteenth century. 

282. Modern Art after 1900. (4) A survey of European and American painting and 
sculpture from 1900 to the present. P-Art 281 is recommended. 

283. Impressionism. (4) A detailed study of the French Impressionist painters, with 
some consideration of Impressionism in other art forms. 

284. Contemporary American Art. (4) An intensive study of American painting and 
sculpture from 1950 to the present. 

286. Studies in Twentieth Century Art: Myth in Modern Art. (3) An analysis of 
traditional Western and non-Western myths as expressed and interpreted hy twentieth 
century artists. 

*291. Individual Study. (4) A course of independent study with faculty guidance. 

*292. Individual Study. (4) A course of independent study with faculty guidance. 

294. Architecture Survey after 1700. (4) A survey of European and American 
architecture from 1700 to the present, emphasizing the twentieth century. 

Studio Art** 

101. Visual Concepts. (3) Introduction to the basic elements of two-dimensional and 
three-dimensional design, to include drawing, painting, and sculpture. Three class 
hours per week. 

111. Introduction to Drawing. (4) An introduction to drawing fundamentals in 
realistic and abstract styles, emphasizing composition, value, line, and form. Six 
laboratory hours per week. P-Art 101. 

112. Introduction to Painting. (4) An introduction to painting fundamentals in a 
variety of contemporary styles in the oil or acrylic media. P-Art 101 or 111. 

115. Introduction to Sculpture. (4) An introduction to basic sculptural styles and 
media, with emphasis on contemporary concepts. P-Art 101. 

117. Introduction to Printmaking. (4) Concentrated introduction to one or more of 
the following areas of printmaking: lithography, intaglio, and silkscreen. P-Art 101 or 
111. 

211. Intermediate Drawing. (4) Continuation of Art 111, with concentrated emphasis 
on idea development. P- 111. 



'Offered on a four-, eleven-, or fifteen-week basis. 
^Prerequisites may be waived with permission of the instructor 



62 



212. Intermediate Painting. (4) Continuation of Art 1 12, with concentrated emphasis 
on idea development. P-112. 

215. Intermediate Sculpture. (4) Continuation of Art 115. with emphasis on idea 
development. P-l 15. 

217. Intermediate Printmaking. (4) Continuation of Art 1 17, with emphasis on idea 
development. P-l 17. 

218. Figure Drawing. (4) Introduction to figure drawing. P-Art 111. 

223. Advanced Drawing. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance. May 
be repeated. P-Art 211. 

222. Advanced Painting. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance. May 
be repeated. P-Art 212. 

219. Advanced Sculpture. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance. May 
be repeated. P-Art 215. 

229. Advanced Printmaking. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance. P- 

Art 217. 

Asian Studies 

Balkrishna Govind Gokhale, Director 

The Asian Studies program, established in 1960 with financial assistance from the 
Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation, is interdisciplinary in its nature and involves the 
cooperation and resources of several departments in the humanities and social 
sciences. Its objectives are to broaden the traditional curriculum with the infusion of a 
systematic knowledge and understanding of the culture of Asia. 
Ill, 112. Elementary Chinese. (4, 4) Emphasis on the development of listening and 
speaking skills in Mandarin. Brief introduction to the writing system and to basic 
sentence patterns. Lab-one hour. 

Ill, 112. Elementary Hindi. (4, 4) Attention mainly to basic Hindi grammar, 
vocabulary building, simple composition, and conversation. Lab-one hour. 

153. Intermediate Hindi. (4) Advanced practice in Hindi composition and 
conversation and introduction to literary Hindi. Lab-one hour. P-Hindi 111, 1 12, or 
equivalent. 

211. Hindi Literature. (4) Reading and translation of selected texts in prose and poetry 
and journalistic Hindi. Lab-one hour. P-Hindi 153. 

211, 212. Asian Studies. (4, 4) Asian thought and civilization. Some dominant themes 
in Asian thought and their influence on Asian civilizations. 

221. Indian Art. (4) A survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture from earliest 
times to 1200 A.D. 

234. Government and Politics of East Asia. (4) An analysis of the political institutions 
and processes in China and Japan, with emphasis on the problems of modernization. 

245. Government and Politics of South Asia. (4) A study of the governments of India, 
Pakistan, Nepal, and Ceylon; emphasis on political organizations, party structures, 



and subnational governmental systems. 

341. Southeast Asia from 1511 to the Present. (4) A survey ol the history and culture of 
Southeast Asia under Western colonial systems, with special reference to economic, 
social, and cultural developments, the tise ol nationalism, and the emergence ol new 
nation -states. 

342. The Middle East from Suleiman the Magnificent to the Present. (4) Majoi subjects 
covered are the rise and fall ol (he Ottoman Empire, the Arabs and Persians under 
Ottoman hegemony, the rise ol Arab nationalism, and the emergence ol the modern 
Arab states and their roles in the post-World War II era. 

343. Imperial China. (4) Development of traditional institutions in Chinese soc iety to 
1644; attention to social, c ultural, and political factors, emphasizing continuity and 
resistance to change. 

344. Modern China. (4) The Manchu Dynasty and its response to the Western 
challenge, (he 1911 Revolution, the warlord era and the rise ol the Communists, 
Chinese Communist society, and the Cultural Revolution. 

345. 346. History and Civilization of South Asia. (4, 4) An introduc tion to the history 
and civilization of South Asia. Emphasis on historical developments in the social, 
economic, and cultural life ol the area. 

347. India in Western Literatures. (4) A one-semester historical survey of images of 
India in Western literatures, with special reference to religious and philosophical 
ideas, art, polity, society, and culture. 

349, 350. East Asia. (4, 1) An introduction to the social, cultural, and political 
development of China, Japan, and Korea. Fall, to 1600; spring, since 1600. 

360. Hinduism. (4) A stuck ol the fundamental features ol the Hindu tradition. 

361. Buddhism. (4) A study ol the Buddhist tradition, its fundamental features, and its 
impact on the cultures of Asia. 

Biology 

Cerald W. Esch, Chairman 

Professors Charles M. Allen, Gerald W. Esch, 

Walter S. Flory, Stephen H. Richardson, Raymond L. Wyatt 

Associate Professors Ralph D. Amen, Veryl E. Becker, 

John F. Dimmick, Ronald V. Dimock, Nazareth Gengozian, 

J. Whitfield Gibbons, Raymond E. Kuhn, James C. McDonald, 

A. Thomas Olive, Robert L. Sullivan, Mary Beth Thomas, Peter D. Weigl 

Assistant Professors Herman E. Eure, Carl B. Fliermans, Hugo C. Lane 

Research Assistant Professor Rebecca C. Jann 

At the end of the sophomore year a student electing to major in biology meets with a 
major adviser to plan the course of study for the junior and senior years. The 
requirements for completion of the major are those in effect at the time of the 
conference, since the curriculum and departmental requirements may change slightly 
during the student's period of residence. All majors are required to take Biology 111, 



hi 



150, 151, and 152. Co-major requirements are four full courses in the physical sciences. 

For students declaring majors in the spring of 1979, the requirement for a major is a 
minimum of forty credits in biology, which must include one course from Biology 
325, 327, 328, 338, and 355, and one from Biology 320, 321. 331, 333, 334, 351, and 376. 
The forty credits must include at least six biology courses carrying five credits. A 
minimum grade average of C on all courses attempted in biology at Wake Forest is 
required for graduation with a major in biology. (Students declaring a major later 
than the spring of 1979 should consult with a biology major adviser for the specific 
major requirements at that time.) 

Prospective majors are strongly urged to take Chemistry 111-112 and Biology 111- 
150 in the freshman year. They are advised to take Biology 151 and Biology 152 in the 
sophomore year, as well as organic chemistry. Deviations from this pattern may 
necessitate summer work to fit the basic courses into an orderly sequence. 

Advanced work in many areas of biology may require additional courses in 
mathematics, the physical sciences, and other areas of biology. The adviser calls these 
to the attention of the student, depending on individual needs. All 300-level biology 
courses presume a background equivalent to introductory and intermediate biology 
(that is. through course 152). 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in biology. To be graduated with the distinction "Honors in 
Biology," they must complete a research project under the direction of a staff member 
and pass a comprehensive oral examination. 

The Departments of Mathematics and Biology offer a joint major leading to a 
Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics-biology. This interdisciplinary program, 
which can include no more than fifty-six credits in mathematics and biology, affords 
the student an opportunity to apply mathematical methods to the development and 
analysis of biological systems. The major consists of the following course 
requirements: Mathematics 112, 155, 157, or 357; Biology 150, 151, 152; and seven 
additional courses (at least three in each department) chosen with the approval of the 
program adivsers. Some courses in the physical sciences are recommended. 

Highly qualified majors may be invited to apply for admission to the honors 
program in the joint major. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Mathematics-Biology," they must complete a senior research paper and pass a 
comprehensive oral examination on the project. For additional information members 
of the staff should be consulted. 

111. Biological Principles. (5) Fundamental principles and concepts in biology. Lab- 
three hours. 

150. Organismic Biology. (5) Morphology and phylogeny of plants and animals. Lab- 
three hours. P-Biology 1 1 1 or by permission. 

151. Cell Biology. (5) Molecular and cellular aspects of biology. Lab-three hours. P- 
Biology 111 and Chemistry 111-112 or by permission. 

152. Population Biology. (4) Population and evolutionary aspects of biology. P- 
Biology 1 1 1 or by permission. 

301, 302. Internship. (4,4) Off-campus work stuck in the public or private sector. A 



65 

written research paper or report based on the experience is required. The student 
must have a supervisor on the job and a biology faculty member to sponsor the project. 
Only four credits per term permitted. Pass Fail. Not to be counted toward major. 
Offered in January. 

312. Genetics. (5) A study of principles of inheritance and their application to plants 
and animals, including man. Laboratory work in the methods of breeding some 
genetically important organisms and of compiling and presenting data. Lab-three 
hours. 

314. Evolution. (4) Analysis of the theories, evidences, and mechanisms of evolution. 

318. Economic Botany. (4) A survey of the plant kingdom giving consideration to both 
the positive and negative importance of plants of all groups to man. 

320. Chordates. (5) A study of chordate animals, with emphasis on comparative 
anatomy and phylogeny. Dissection of representative forms in the laboratory. Lab- 
three hours. 

321. Parasitology. (5) A survey of protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites horn 
the standpoint of morphology, taxonomy, life-histories, and host parasite 
relationships. Lab-three hours. 

323. Animal Behavior. (4) A survey of laboratory and field research on animal 
behavior. May count as biology or psychology but not both; choice to be determined at 
registration. 

324. Botany for Everyday Use. (4) A course to develop a knowledge and appreciation of 
common plants and plant products and plant handling. Not to be taken for credit 
toward major. Offered in January. 

325. Plant Anatomy. (5) A study of comparative anatomy of the vascular plants, with 
emphasis on phylogeny. Lab-four hours. 

326. Microbiology. (5) A study of the more important groups of microorganisms, with 
emphasis on bacteria and their activities. Lab-four hours. 

327. Nonvascular Plants. (5) An examination of representative nonvascular plants, 
with emphasis on morphology and phylogeny. Lab-four hours. 

328. Vascular Plants. (5) A comparative survey of the vascular plants, with emphasis 
on structure, reproduction, classification, and phylogeny. Lab-three hours. 

331. Invertebrates. (5) Systematic study of invertebrates, with emphasis on functional 
morphology, behavior, ecology, and phylogeny. Lab-three hours. 

333. Vertebrates. (5) Systematic study of vertebrates, with emphasis on evolution, 
physiology, behavior, and ecology. Laboratory devoted to systematic, field, and 
experimental studies. Lab-four hours. 

334. Entomology. (5) A study of insects, with emphasis on structure, development, 
taxonomy, and phylogeny. Lab-four hours. 

338. Plant Taxonomy. (5) A study of the classification of seed plants, with emphasis on 
the comparative study of orders and families. Lab-four hours. 



66 



340. Ecology. (5) Interrelationships among living systems and their environments; 
structure and dynamics of major ecosystem types; contemporary problems in ecology. 
Lab-four hours. 

341. Marine Biology. (5) An introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological 
parameters affecting the distribution of marine organisms. Lab-three hours. 

342. Aquatic Ecology. (5) A course designed to cover the general principles and 
concepts of limnology and aquatic biology as they apply to lentic and lotic habitats. A 
major portion of the field studies centered at the Belews Creek biological station. Lab- 
three hours. 

351. Animal Physiology. (5) Nerve, muscle, and regulation physiology offered in odd- 
numbered years; digestion, absorption, and transport in even-numbered years. Lab- 
three hours. 

352. Nutritional Physiology. (4) Deals with nutritional needs of college-age students 
and the areas where diets are usually deficient. Not to be taken for credit toward 
major. Offered in January. 

354. Endocrinology. (4) A course in vertebrate physiological endrocnnology, with 
particular reference to phylogenesis and embryology, including a section on 
invertebrate endocrinology. 

355. Developmental Physiology. (5) A functional study of the growth, development, 
and reproduc tion of selected organisms, with emphasis on the regulatory mechanisms 
of morphogenesis. Lab-three hours. 

357. Cryptobiology. (5) An examination of common hypobiotic rest exhibited by 
living systems, including a consideration of quiescence, dormancy, diapause, 
hibernation, estivation, sleep, coma, and death. Designed to focus attention on 
hypobiotic states which border on senescence and death, to more clearly distinguish 
living from dead conditions. Various biologic materials in a state of rest examined. 
Lab-three hours. 

360. Development. (5) A study of development, including aspects of vertebrate, 
invertebrate, and other developmental systems, emphasizing the regulation of 
differentiation. Lab-four hours. 

362. Immunology. (4) A study of the components and protective mechanisms of the 
immune system. 

370. Biochemistry. (5) A lecture and laboratory course in biochemistry, including 
principles of biochemistry, chemical composition of living systems, intermediary 
metabolism, enzyme kinetics, biochemical techniques, and biochemical energetics. 
Lab-three hours. 

372. Histology and Microtechnique. (5) A study of the structure and function of cells 
and tissues, with laboratory emphasis on methods of preparation of cells and tissues 
for examination. Lab-four hours. 

374. Methods in Electron Microscopy. (5) Techniques in preparation of materials for 
examination with the electron microscope. Offered in January. P-Permission of the 
instructor. 



67 



376. Icthyology. (5) A comparative study of structure/function, classification, and 
phylogeny of fish. Lab-three hours. 

382. Human Heredity. (4) A study of the principles of heredity as applied to man. 
Emphasis on inheritance of both usual and aberrant human phenotypes. Either 
Biology 312 or Biology 382 may be taken for credit toward major but not both. Offered 
in January. 

391, 392. Special Problems in Biology. (2,2) Independent library and laboratory 
investigation carried out under the supervision of a member of the staff. Pass Fail or 
for grade at discretion of the instructor. P-Permission of the instructor. 

393, 394. Special Problems in Biology. (2,2) Courses designed for students who wish to 
continue special problems beyond Biology 391 and 392. Pass Pail optional. May not 
be counted toward major. P-Permission of the instructor. 

395. Philosophy of Biology. (4) A seminar course dealing with the philosophical 
structure of the biological sciences, including an examination of major conceptual 
schemes and theoretical ideas unique to biology. 

397. Seminar in Biology. (2-4) Consideration of major biological topics through 
intensive reading and discussions. 

398. Scientific Communications. (3) An introduction to bibliographic and graphic 
methods, including microscopy, photography, scientific illustration and writing, and 
preparation of manuscripts. Open to juniors or by permission of the instructor. 

Business and Accountancy 

Delmer P. Hylton, Chairman 

Professors Delmer P. Hylton, Jeanne Owen 

Associate Professors Leon P. Cook Jr., Stephen Ewing, Thomas C. Taylor 

Assistant Professor Arun P. Dewasthali 

Lecturer Glenn L. Clark Jr. 

Instructors John B. Coullard, Douglas J. Lincoln 

The major in business or in accountancy must take one or preferably two courses in 
mathematics and at least one course in economics. 

A student must have a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 before admission as a 
major in the Department of Business and Accountancy. A minimum grade point 
average of 2.0 on all work attempted in the Department of Business and Accountancy 
is requited for graduation with a major in business or accountancy. 

Business 

The Bachelor of Science degree in business is offered for the student who anticipates 
a career in the business world. The curriculum is designed to equip the student with 
basic tools and knowledge which should enable him or her to perform adequately in 
the first position and to advance to more responsible positions in management. 

For the major in business, a minimum of thirty-six credits earned in the department 
is required. Included in the major must be Accountancy 1 1 1 and 1 12; Business 201, 202, 
211, 221, 231, 261; and one course from the following: Business 212. 222, 232, or 241. A 



68 



minimum of twenty-eight credits in the major must be earned in the College. 

Students with a grade point average of at least 3.0 on all college work and 3.3 on all 
work in business are invited to apply for admission to the honors program in business. 
A project, paper, or readings and/or an oral exam are required. Those who 
successfully complete the requirements specified by the department are graduated 
with the designation "Honors in Business." For additional information interested 
students should consult a member of the departmental faculty. 

The Departments of Mathematics and Business and Accountancy offer a joint major 
leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics-business. This 
interdisciplinary program prepares students for careers in business with a strong back- 
ground in mathematics. The major consists of the following course requirements: 
Mathematics 111, 112, 155, 157, and256or 355; Accounting 1 1 1, 112; Business 21 1,221, 
231; either Business 201 or Mathematics 357; either Business 202 or Mathematics 253; 
and two additional courses chosen from Accounting 252, 278, Business 281, Mathe- 
matics 121, 348, 353, 381, or specially designed January courses. 

Highly qualified majors may be invited to apply for admission to the honors 
program in the joint major. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Mathematics-Business," they must complete a senior research paper and pass a 
comprehensive oral examination on the project. For additional information 
interested students should consult a member of the departmental faculty. 

170. Survey of Data Processing. (4) A management-oriented presentation of 
vocabulary, concepts, and trends in information systems. Effective management of 
EDP systems and current research in the field are examined. P -Accountancy 112. 

201. Quantitative Methods I. (4) Techniques of analysis of numerical data, including 
descriptive statistics, linear correlation and regression, statistical estimation, and 
hypothesis-testing. P-Mathematics 157. 

202. Quantitative Methods II. (4) Decision theory emphasizing the combined use of 
information from historical data, subjective judgments, and sampling results in 
business decision-making. Nonparametric statistics and linear programming models 
included. P-Business 201. 

211. Organization and Management. (4) The study of the basic management 
functions, principles, concepts, and practices in the operation of a modern business 
organization. 

212. Advanced Management. (4) A study of the techniques of decision-making using 
case analyses, problem-solving, and report-writing procedures based on extensive 
readings. P-Business 211. 

221. Principles of Marketing. (4) Survey of marketing structures, concepts, and 
motivation of current marketing environment. Study of managerial decisions 
necessary in the distribution of industrial and consumer goods. 

222. Advanced Marketing. (4) A study of marketing management's generation and use 
of explanatory and predictive data concerning consumer market behavior. P-Business 
201 and 221. 

223. International Marketing. (4) An analysis of the nature, organization, and methods 



69 



of marketing at the international level, including the functions and problems of 
international trade centers and involving a visit to a trade center. Usually offered in 
January. P-Business 221 and permision of the instructor. 

231. Financial Management. (4) Analysis of financial decision-making at the level of 
the individual business enterprise. P-Accountancy 112. 

232. Advanced Financial Management. (4) Management decision-making applied to 
the financial function, including credit, investment, and related problems. P-Business 
201 and 231. 

235. Personal Finance. (4) A study of methods for achieving goals related to individual 
financial problems. Not to be counted toward major. P-Permission of the instructor. 

241. Labor Policy. (4) A study of selected topics in labor management relations from 
the view of labor, management, and the public. 

261. Legal Environment of Business. (4) A study of the legal environment within 
which business decisions must be made. 

281. Reading and Research. (2,3 or 4) An advanced course devoted to individual 
reading and research in business. P-Permission of the instructor. 

Accountancy 

The Bachelor of Science degree in accountancy is offered to those students who 
expect to pursue a career in the accounting profession. The curriculum is designed to 
equip the student for staff and managerial positions in public accounting and 
industrial accounting and similar positions in non-profit institutions. A student who 
completes the degree in accountancy is eligible to sit for the CPA examination in 
North Carolina. 

The major in accountancy requires a minimum of fifty-two credits earned in the 
department. Required courses are Accountancy 111, 112, 151, 152, 252, 261, 271, and 
273, and Business 201, 231, and 261. A minimum of forty-one credits in the major must 
be earned in the College. 

Students with a grade point average of at least 3.0 on all college work and 3.3 on all 
work in accountancy are invited to apply for admission to the honors program in 
accountancy. A project, paper, or readings and or an oral exam are required. Those 
who successfully complete the requirements specified by the department are graduated 
with the designation "Honors in Accountancy." For additional information 
interested students should consult a member of the departmental faculty. 

111. Accounting Principles I. (5) The basic accounting process and underlying 
principles pertaining to the preparation and interpretation of published financial 
statements. 

112. Accounting Principles II. (4) A continuation of Accountancy 111 and an 
emphasis on managerial accounting. P-Accountancy 111. 

151. Intermediate Accounting. (4) A detailed analysis of theory and related problems 
for typical accounts on published financial statements. P-Accountancy 112. 



70 



152. Intermediate Accounting. (4) A continuation of Accountancy 151. P- Accountancy 
151. 

201. Business Law. (4) A study of the Uniform Commerical Code. Open only to senior 
majors. P-Business 261. 

252. Cost Accounting. (4) An in-depth study of management accounting, including 
budgeting, product-costing, cost allocation, standard costs, transfer-pricing, 
differential analysis, and cost-behavior analysis. P-Accountancy 112. 

253. Accounting Information Systems. (4) A study of functions performed by an 
adequate information system and methods and procedures necessary to supply useful 
data, oriented toward computerized data processing. P-Accountanc y 252. 

254. Accounting in the Not-for-Profit Sector. (3 or 4) An examination of accounting 
theory and practice in governmental and eleemosynary organizations, including an 
examination of national income accounting. P-Accountancy 151. 

261. Advanced Accounting Problems. (4) A study of the more complex problems found 
in business operations, business combinations, reorganizations, and dissolution. P- 
Accountancy 152. 

271. Income Tax Accounting. (5) Accounting for purposes of complying with the 
Internal Revenue Code. Preparation of personal and business tax returns. P- 
Accountancy 152. 

273. Auditing. (4) Designed to familiarize the student with the CPA profession, with 
particular emphasis on the attest-function. P-Accountancy 152 and 252. 

275. CPA Review. (4) An intensive study of CPA-type problems found on the 
accounting practice and accounting theory sections of the CPA exam. P-Accountancy 
252 and 261. 

278.Reading and Research. (2, 3, or 4) Directed study in specialized areas of 
accountancy. P-Permission of the instructor. 

Chemistry 

H. Wallace Baird, Chairman 

Professors H. Wallace Baird, Phillip J. Hamrick Jr., Harry B. Miller, 

John W. Nowell 

Associate Professors Paul M. Cross Jr., Roger A. Hegstrorn, Ronald E. Noftle 

Assistant Professors Willie L. Hinze, Charles F. Jackels, Susan C. Jackels 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry must include Chemistry 111-112 or 1 18, 
221-222. 341, 342, 361; mathematics through Mathematics 1 1 1; and Physics 1 1 1-1 12 or 
its equivalent. Mathematics 112 should be taken before Chemistry 341. 

The Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry must include Chemistry 111-112 or 118, 
221-222, 334, 341-342, 361, 371, 391, or 392; mathematics through Mathematics 112; 
and Physics 121-122 or 111-112. Other courses which are strongly recommended for the 
B.S. degree candidate are Mathematics 113, 121, and 251 and Physics 161-162. 

Majors are required to complete on a letter-grade basis the related physics and 
mathematics courses, both those which are required and those which are strongly 



71 



recommended. Unless otherwise stated, all chemistry courses are open to chemistry 
majors only on a letter-grade basis. 

An average of Cin the first two years of chemistry is required of students who elect to 
major in the department. Admission to any class is contingent upon satisfactory 
grades in prerequisite courses, and registration for advanced courses must be approved 
by the department. 

The department is on the list of departments certified by the American Chemical 
Society. 

Qualified majors are considered for honors in chemistry. To be graduated with the 
designation "Honors in Chemistry," a student must complete satisfactorily Chemistry 
391-392 or an independent study project approved by the department and an 
examination covering primarily the independent study project. For additional 
information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Prospective majors are urged to take Chemistry 1 1 1-1 12 in the freshman year. For 
B.S. majors the following schedule of chemistry and closely related courses is 
recommended: 

Freshman Sophomore 

Chemistry 111-112 Chemistry 221-222 

Mathematics 111-112 Mathematics 113-121 

Physics 121-122 

Junior Senior 

Chemistry 341-342 Chemistry 361 

Chemistry 334 Chemistry 371 

Physics 161-162 Chemistry 391 or 392 

Mathematics 251 Chemistry, mathematics, and physics 

111, 112. College Chemistry. (5, 5) Fundamental chemical principles. Laboratory 
covers basic quantitative analysis. Lab-three hours. 

118. Principles of Chemistry. (5) Fundamental chemical principles, with emphasis on 
structural concepts. Laboratory work on basic quantitative analysis. Lab-four hours. 
P-Chemistry 111 or permission of the instructor. 

221-222. Organic Chemistry. (5, 5) Principles and reactions of organic chemistry. Lab- 
four hours. P-Chemistry 112 or 118. 

323. Organic Analysis. (4 or 5) The systematic identification of organic compounds. 
Lab-four hours. P-Chemistry 222. 

324. Chemical Synthesis. (2 or 4) A library, conference, and laboratory course. Lab- 
four or eight hours. P-Chemistry 222. 

334. Chemical Analysis. (4 or 5) Theoretical and practical applications of modern 
methods of chemical analysis. Lab-four hours. C-Chemistry 341. 

341, 342. Physical Chemistry. (5, 5) Fundamentals of physical chemistry. Lab-four 
hours. P-Chemistry 112 or 118; Mathematics 111; Physics 111-112 or 121-122. 



72 



361. Inorganic Chemistry. (5) Principles and reactions of inorganic chemistry. Lab- 
loui hours. P-Chemistry 341. 

362. Inorganic Chemistry. (4) Continuation of pi in< iples of inorganic chemistry with 
practical applications to inorganic systems. P-Chemistry 361. 

371. Introductory Quantum Chemistry. (4) Introduction to the quantum theory and 
its application to chemical systems. P-Chemistry 342 or permission of the instructor. 

381, 382. Chemistry Seminar. (0, 0) Discussions of contemporary research. Attendance 
required of B.S. chemistry majors in the junior and senior years. 

391, 392. Independent Study. (2, 2) Library, conference, and independent study. Lab- 
six hours. 

Classical Languages 

John L. Andronica, Chairman 

Professor Carl V. Harris 

Associate Professor John L. Andronica 

Assistant Professor Robert W. Ulery Jr. 

Visiting Assistant Professor Laura M. Stone 

Instructor Alice V. Hinckley 

The Department of Classical Languages offers three majors: Greek, Latin, and 
classical studies. 

A major in Greek requires forty credits in the department. Thirty-two of these 
credits must be in the Greek language. Classics 270 is also a requirement. 

For those who begin Latin with Latin 1 1 1 or 1 13, a major requires thirty-six credits 
in the department beyond the elementary level (1 1 1-1 12 or 113). Twenty-eight of these 
credits must be in the Latin language. For those who begin in the College with Latin 
153, a major requires thirty-six credits in the department. Twenty-eight of these credits 
must be in the Latin language. For those who begin with a 200-level course in the 
College, a major requires thirty-two credits in the department. Twenty-four of these 
credits must be in the Latin language. 

A major in classical studies requires fifty-six credits. A minimum of thirty-six 
credits of course work must be taken in the department. A maximum of forty-eight 
credits in the department may be exceeded only if a student undertakes course work in 
both Latin and Greek. The student must take a minimum of two courses at the 
200-level in either Greek or Latin and the following: Art 241 (Ancient Art), Classics 265 
(Greek Literature in Translation), Classics 272 (Latin Literature in Translation), 
Classics 270 (Greek Civilization), and Classics 271 f Roman Civilization). 

A maximum of sixteen credits may be taken in the following: Art 227 (Art of the 
Ancient \'ear East), 252 (Medieval Art), 242 (Mmoan and Mycenaean Art), 244 (Greek 
Art), 245 (Roman Art), 246 (Greek and Roman Architecture); History 215, 216 (The 
Ancient World); Philosophy 201 (Ancient and Medieval Philosophy), 230 (Plato), 231 
(Aristotle); Religion 317 {The Ancient Near East), 363 (Hellenistic Religions); Hebrew 
111-112, 153, 211.* 



*()ther courses may be allowed with the permission of the department. 



7:5 



The requirements for certification to teach Latin in high school are the same as the 
requirements for a major in Latin. A major in classical studies serves as an appropriate 
part of the program of studies required for certification to teach Latin in high school. 
A student wishing to secure this certification should confer with the chairman of the 
department. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in Latin or Greek. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Latin" or "Honors in Greek," they must complete an honors research project and pass 
a comprehensive oral examination. At least two of the courses counted toward the 
major must be seminar courses. For additional information members ot the 
departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Greek 

101. Intensive Introduction to Classical Greek. (4) Greek grammar; an introduction to 
the reading of Greek, designed especially for those who have no knowledge of Greek 
and who are not contemplating further formal study of the Greek language. 

Ill, 112. Elementary Greek. (5, 5) Greek grammar; selections from Greek prose writers 
and poets. 

153. Intermediate Greek. (4) Grammar and Xenophon's Anabasis. Thorough drill in 
syntax. 

211. Plato. (4) Selections from the dialogues of Plato. 

212. Homer. (4) Selections from the Iliad and the Odyssey. 

221, 222. Selected Readings. (3, 3) Intensive reading courses designed to meet 
individual needs and interests. 

231. The Greek New Testament. (4) Selections from the Greek New Testament. 

241. Greek Tragedy. (3) Euripides' Medea. This course includes a study of the origin 
and history of Greek tragedy, with collateral reading of selected tragedies in 
translation. Seminar. 

242. Greek Comedy. (3) Aristophanes' Clouds. This course includes a study of the 
origin and history of Greek comedy, with collateral reading of selected comedies in 
translation. Seminar. 

291, 292. Honors in Greek. (2, 2) Directed research for honors paper. 

Latin 

111, 112. Elementary Latin. (4, 4) Introduction to Latin grammar. 

113. Elementary Latin. (5) Introduction to Latin grammar. Covers material of Latin 
111 and 112 in one semester. Not open to students who have had Latin 111 or 112. 

125. Medieval Latin. (4) An introduction to the literary language of Western Europe, 
300-1300 A.D.; reading and discussion of the literature in the original and in English. 

153. Intermediate Latin. (5) Grammar review and selected readings. 



71 



211. Vergil. (4) Intensive readings from the Aeneid, with emphasis on literary 
values. 

212. Roman Historians. (4) A reading of the works of Sallust and Livy, with attention 
to historical milieu and the norms of ancient historiography. 

216. Roman Lyric Poetry. (4) An interpretation and evaluation of lyric poetry through 
readings from a wide variety of the poems of Catullus and Horace. 

221. Tacitus. (4) A reading and critical analysis ol the works of Tacitus. 

225. Roman Epistolography. (4) Selected readings from the correspondence of Cicero 
and Pliny the Younger and the literary epistles of Horace and Ovid. 

226. Roman Comedy. (4) Reading of selected comedies of Plautus and Terence, with 
a study of literary values and dramatic techniques. 

241. Satire. (3) Selected readings from Lucilius, Horace, and Juvenal. Attention given 
to the origin and development of the genre. Seminar. 

242. Satire. (3) Readings from Petronius and the Ludus de Morte Claudii. Seminar. 

243. Latin Readings. (3) A course designed to meet individual needs and interests. 

250. Prose Composition. (2) 

261. Lucretius. (3) Readings from the De Rerum Natura, with attention to literary 
values and philosophical import. Seminar. 

262. Cicero. (3) Readings from Cicero's philosophical essays, with a survey of Greek 
philosophical antecedents. 

265. The Elegiac Poets. (3) Readings of Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid, with study 
of the elegiac tradition. Seminar. 

291, 292. Honors in Latin. (2, 2) Directed research for honors paper. 

Classics 

251. Classical Mythology. (4) A study of the most important myths of the Greeks and 
Romans. Many of the myths are studied in their literary context. 

252. Women in Antiquity. (3-4) The course explores the place of women in Greek and 
Roman society, men's views of them, their views of themselves, and their 
contributions to society, through primary source readings from the ancient authors. 

253. Greek Epic Poetry in Translation. (4) Oral epic poetry, with primary emphasis on 
the Iliad and the Odyssey of Homer and the later development of the genre. 

254. Roman Epic Poetry in Translation. (4) A study of the Latin treatment and 
development of the literary form, with emphasis on Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, and 
Lucan. 

263. Tragic Drama in Translation. (4) A study of the origins and development of Greek 
tragedy and its influence on Roman writers, with readings from Aeschylus, Sophocles, 
and Euripides. 

264. Greek and Roman Comedy in Translation. (4) Representative works of 



75 



Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence, with attention to the origins and 
development of comedy. 

265. A Survey of Greek Literature in Translation. ( i) A study of selec lions from Greek 
literature in English translation. A knowledge ol the Greek languate is not required. 

270. Greek Civilization. (3) Le< tures and collateral reading upon those phases of Greek 
civilization which have particular significance for the modern world. A knowledge of 
the Greek language is not required. 

271. Roman Civilization. (.'5) Lee tures and collateral reading upon the general suhject 
of Rome's contributions to the modern world. A knowledge of the Latin language is 
not required. 

272. A Survey of Latin Literature in Translation. (4) A study of selections from Latin 
literature in English translation. A knowledge of the Latin language is not required. 

275. Ancient and Modern Rome. (4) Students trace the growth of Rome and Roman 
civilization, primarily through exclusions to important archeological sites, visits to 
museums, lectures, and parallel readings. Usually offered in January. 

276. Ancient and Modern Greece. (4) A guided tour of the museums and archeological 
sites ol ancient Greece in their Byzantine and modern context, supplemented by 
lectures on Greek and Cretan-Minoan civilization. Usually offered in January. 

Economics 

J. Van Wagstaff, Chairman 

Professor J. Van Wagstaff 

Associate Professors William E. Cage, Donald E. Frey, John C. Moorhouse 

Assistant Professor Miles O. Bidvvell 

Visiting Assistant Professor Charles H. Breeden 

Instructors Joe O. Rogers, James R. Rook 

The objectives of the economics program are to help prepare students for effective 
participation in the decision-making processes of society, to develop analytical skills 
in solving economic problems, to promote a better understanding of alternative 
economic systems, and to provide a balanced curriculum to prepare students for 
graduate study or positions in industry and government. 

The major in economics requires a minimum of thirty-six credits in economics, 
including Economics 151, 152, 201, and 202.* The department recommends that 
majors take Mathematics 111, either to fulfill the Division II requirement or as an 
elective. 

The remaining courses for a major in economics and courses in related fields are 
selected by the student and the adviser. A minimum grade average of C on all courses 
attempted in economics is required for graduation. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in economics. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 



^Economics 111 satisfies the requirement fur Economics l^l and 1^2 by permission of the 
department. 



76 



Economics," they must complete a satisfactory economics research project, pass a 
comprehensive oral examination on the project, and complete Economics 281 or 287 
and Economics 288. For additional information members of the departmental faculty 
should be consulted. 

The Departments of Mathematics and Economics offer a joint major leading to a 
Bachelor of Science degree in mathematical economics. This interdisciplinary 
program, consisting of no more than fifty-six credits, affords the student an 
opportunity to apply mathematical methods to the development of economic theory, 
models, and quantitative analysis. The major consists of the following course 
requirements: Mathematics 111, 112, 113, 121, 251 ; Economics 151. 152, 201 , 202, 203; a 
joint seminar in mathematical economics; and three additional courses chosen with 
approval of the program advisers. Students electing the joint major must receive 
permission from both the Department of Economics and the Department of 
Mathematics. 

Highly qualified majors may be invited to apply for admission to the honors 
program in the joint major. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Mathematics-Economics," they must complete a senior research paper and pass a 
comprehensive oral examination on the subject. For additional information 
members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

111. Introduction to Economic Analysis. (5) A one-semester survey of the discipline. 
Elementary supply and demand analysis are considered, in addition to more general 
topics involving the formation of national economic policy. Credit is not granted for 
this course and Economics 151 or 152. 

151. Principles of Economics. (4) A study of individual economic units in a market 
economy, with some attention to monopoly, labor unions, and poverty. 

152. Principles of Economics. (4) Attention is focused on the functioning of the 
economy as a whole, with particular reference to employment, inflation, economic 
growth, and policy. P-Economics 151. 

170. Public Choice. (4) Traditional tools of economic analysis are employed to explore 
such topics in political science as political organization, elections, coalition 
formation, the optimal provision of public goods, and the scope of government. 
Usually offered in January. P-Economics 151-152. 

171. Environmental Economics. (4) The quality of life examined from an economic 
perspective. Pollution, population, resource depletion, and the energy crises are some 
of the topics studied. Usually offered in January. P-Economics 111 or 151-152. 

172. International Finance. (4) A study of financial market behavior and exchange rate 
fluctuations in the financial capitals of Europe. Usually offered in January. P- 
Economics 111 or 151-152. 

188. Independent Study. (4) A student-initiated project involving reading and 
research. Usually offered in January. P-Economics 1 1 1 or 151-152 and permission of 
the department. 

201. Microeconomic Theory. (4) Develops the theory of consumer behavior and the 
theory of the firm, with emphasis on price and output determination under various 



77 



market conditions. P-Economics 151, 152. 

202. Macroeconomic Theory. (4) A study of Keynesian and post- Key nesian theories 
about the determination of the level of national income, employment, and economic 
growth. P-Economics 151, 152. 

203. Introduction to Econometrics. (5) Economic analysis through quantitative 
methods, with emphasis on model construction and empirical research. 

205. Seminar in Mathematical Economics. (3) Calculus and matrix methods used to 
develop basic tools of economic analysis. P-Mathematic s 111-112 and Economics 151- 
152. 

221. Public Finance. (4) An examination of the economic behavior of government. 
Includes principles of taxation, spending, borrowing, and debt-management. P- 
Economics 151, 152. 

222. Monetary Theory and Policy. (3) A rigorous development of the theory of supply 
and demand for money, plus the interrelationship among prices, interest rates, and 
aggregate output. P-Economics 151, 152. 

242. Labor Economics. (4) Economic analysis of wages and hours, employment, wage 
and job discrimination, investment in education, and unions. P-Economics 151, 152. 

243. Economic Demography. (3, 1) Various aspects of population growth and fertility 
decisions are studied from the point of view of the new economics of time allocation. 
P-Economics 151, 152. 

244. Industrial Organization. (3, 4) An analysis of market structure, with particular 
reference to organization practices, price formation, efficiency, and public regulation. 
P-Economics 151, 152. 

251. International Economics. (4) A study of international trade theory, balance of 
payments, foreign exchange, trade restrictions, and commercial policies. P- 
Economics 151, 152. 

252. Economic Growth and Development. (3, 4) A study of the problems of economic 
growth, with particular attention to the less developed countries of the world. P- 
Economics 151, 152. 

255. Comparative Economic Systems. (3, 4) An objective examination of the theory 
and practices of various economic systems, including capitalism, socialism, and 
communism. P-Economics 151, 152. 

256. Urban Economics. (4) Application of economic theory to suburbanization, land 
values, urban decay, zoning, location decisions of firms and households, and 
metropolitan fiscal problems. P-Economics 151, 152. 

261. American Economic Development. (4) The application of economic theory to 
historical problems and issues in the American economy. P-Economics 151. 152. 

262. History of Economic Thought. (4) An historical survey of the main developments 
in economic thought from the Biblical period to the twentieth century. P-Economics 
151, 152. 

281, 282. Contemporary Economic Problems. (2, 2) An economic analysis of current 



78 



issues, with emphasis on contributions of economic theory to policy formation. 
Courses are taught sequentially during one semester. The student may take either one 
or both courses. P-Permission of the instructor. 

287. Senior Readings. (3, 4) A student faculty seminar in which selected publications 
are analyzed and discussed. Pass Fail. P-Permission oi the instructor. 

288. Economic Research. (4) 

Education 

Herman J. Preseren, Chairman 

Professors Thomas M. Elmore, John E. Parker Jr., Herman J. Preseren 

Associate Professors John H. Litcher, J. Don Reeves 

Assistant Professors Linda N. Clark, Nancy H. Hubers, Joseph O. Milner, 

Leonard P. Roberge 

Lecturers Joseph Dodson, Thane McDonald, Richard I. Tirrell 

Instructor Nancy J. Deese 

Teacher education students ordinarily major in the academic areas in which they 
plan to teach. Only students planning to be certified in the broad areas of intermediate 
education, science, or social studies are permitted to major in education. A major in 
education requires completion of the approved program in education and the courses 
listed as academic requirements for the intermediate, science, or social studies 
certificate. 

University Policy. The University recognizes that the educational profession is 
important to society and that the welfare of mankind is largely determined by the 
quality of its educational leadership. One of the major objectives of the University has 
been and continues to be the preparation of teachers and other professional school 
personnel, as endorsed by vote of the faculty on November 18, 1963. 

The University is committed to quality in teacher education, as evinced by selective 
admission to the program, a wide range of approved courses of professional 
instruction, and a closely supervised piac ticum suitable to the professional needs of 
students. 

In addition to the professional program, the department provides elective courses 
open to all students, including those not in teacher education programs. Such courses 
supplement the work of other departments and provide generally for the liberal 
education of students. 

Teacher Certification. The North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction 
issues the Professional Class A teacher's certificate to graduates who have completed 
an approved program, including the specified courses in their teaching field(s) and the 
prescribed courses in education, who have demonstrated specific competencies, and 
who receive recommendations from the designated official(s) of their teaching area(s) 
and from the chairman of the department or a deputy. 

Special students not completing an approved program are required to secure an 
analysis of their deficiencies for the Class A certificate from the department, which 
helps plan a program to remove these deficiencies. 

Certification requirements for other states should be secured from the department 
for assistance in planning a program to meet the certification requirements of those 



7') 



states. 

Admission Requirements. Admission to the teacher education program normally 
occurs during the sophomore year. Admission involves filing an offic ial application 
with the department, being screened by faculty committees, and being officially 
approved by the department. 

Course Requirements. The approved program oi teacbei education requires 
candidates to complete successfully a series of professional education courses. 
Psychology 151 and Speech Communication 151 are recommended electives. The 
exact sequence of professional and academic courses varies with a student's particular 
program and is determined in conference with the candidate, his or her adviser, and or 
a member of the education faculty. In most cases, the majority of the professional work 
in the teacher education program is taken simultaneously during one semester of the 
senior year, according to the availability of programs. Candidates for the intermediate 
certificate may begin course work required for certification as early as the sophomore 
year. A cooperative agreement with Salem College provides education majors an 
opportunity to be certified in learning disabilities or in primary grades. 

While enrolled in the block semester the student is not allowed lo take courses 
concurrently that would interfere with assigned student teaching during the regular 
public school day (generally 8:00 a.m. to 3:45 p.m.), oi to take more than one course 
occurring outside the regulai school day. 

Stude)il Teaching. Prerequisites for registering for student teaching include (1) 
senior or graduate standing or classification as a graduate-level special student; (2) 
completion of course(s) in the foundations ol education and either Education 202 or 
203; (3) an average of at least Con all courses taken in the College; (4) a grade average of 
at least Con all courses taken in the area of certification or, in case of two or more fields 
of certification, in each ol the areas; (5) approval lor admission to the teacher 
education program; (6) submission of a recent tuberculin test or X-ray report showing 
"no significant abnormalities"; and (7) approval by the diiectoi ol undergraduate 
teacher education or the director of intermediate education. 

Students are assigned to student teaching opportunities by public school officials 
on the basis of available positions and the professional needs of the student and the 
public school system. (The University does not assume the responsibility for 
transportation to schools dining student teaching.) 

Teaching Area Requirements 

English — thirty-six credits, including four credits from courses numbered 160-175; at 

least sixteen credits from courses numbered 300-399; 323; 390. 

French — thirty-six credits, including French 153, 216 or 217, 221, 222, 224, or their 

equivalents; at least eight credits in French literature beyond 217. 

Spanish — thirty-six credits, including Spanish 153, 215 or 216. 221, 222, 223, 224, or 

their equivalents; eight credits from 225, 226, 227; at least four additional credits in 

literature. 

French and Spanish — fifty-six credits, including French 153x, 216, 217, 221, 222, and 

224, plus Spanish 153x; either 215 or 216; 221; 222; either 223 or 224; and eight credits 

from 225, 226, 227, or their equivalents. 



German — thirty-two credits, including German 153, 211, 212; eight credits from 
German 217, 218, 219, 220; at least twelve credits in German literature beyond 212. 
Latin — based on two high school units, thirty-six credits in the Department of 
Classical Languages, of which twenty-one must be in the Latin language. 
Intermediate Education — forty-two credits, including appropriate basic and 
divisional course requirements; eight credits in language arts; eight credits in social 
studies; eight credits in science; eight credits in mathematics; lour credits in music; 
four credits in humanities; two credits in physical education. Remaining certification 
requirements are obtained through intermediate education courses and an academic 
concentration in one of the teaching areas of the intermediate grades. 
Mathematics — forty credits, including Mathematics 111,1 12, 113, 121, 221, 231, 332; 
at least eight credits from other 300-level courses. 

Music — forty-eight credits; including Music 171-171, 182, 184, 186, 187. 213, 214; 
Education 280, 282, 284, 291. 

Physical Education and Health — lorty-three credits, including Physical Education 
220, 221. 222. 224, 230, 240, 250, 353, 357, 360, 363; Biology 111 and 150. 
Science — ten credits each in biology, chemistry, and physics; eight credits in 
mathematics; additional work in the area of concentration: biology (twenty credits), 
chemistry (twenty credits), or physics (seventeen credits). Eor certification in the 
individual fields of science, the following are required: biology (thirty credits), 
chemistry (thirty credits), or physics (twenty-seven credits). 

Social Studies — forty-eight credits, including twenty-four credits in history, with at 
least six to eight credits in United States history and six to eight credits in world 
(European) history; twenty credits from politics, sociology, anthropology, or 
economics, with no more than eight credits in any one area; and four credits in 
geography. For certification in the individual fields of the social studies, the following 
are required: economics (twenty-four credits), politics (twenty-four credits), history 
(twenty-foui credits, with at least six to eight credits in United States history and six to 
eight credits in world [European] history), and sociology (twenty-four credits). 
Speech Communication — forty-four credits, including Speech Communication 121, 
151 or 152, 153, 155 or 376, 161, 231, 252, or S355, 261, and 241 or 245 or 283-284, and 
two 300-level speech communication electives. 

Theatre Arts — forty to forty-two credits, including Speech Communication 121, 151, 
223, 231, 226. 227, 283-284, 322 or S324, and 327 or 328; English 329 or 323 or 369; 
Physical Education 162. 

Speech and Theatre — fifty credits, including Speech Communication 121 or 241 or 
245, 151 or 152, 153, 155 or 376. 161 or 227, 231, 223, 226, 252 or S355. 261, 283-284, 321- 
322. 

Education courses required for a secondary or special subject certificate are 
Education 201 or both 303 and 304, 202 or 203, 211, 251, 291, and 331. Education 
courses required for an intermediate certificate are Education 201, 202, or 203; 21 1; 221; 
222: 223; 251; 271 or 272; 293; 295: 296; and 313 and 383. 

201. Foundations of Education. (4) Philosophical, historical, and sociological 
foundations of education, including analysis of contemporary issues and problems. 

202 or 203. School Practicum. (2) Assigned experiences in elementary and secondary 
schools. Weeklv seminar. 



211. Educational Psychology. (4) General principles of human development. The 
nature, theories, processes, and conditions of effective teaching learning. Appraising 
and directing learning. P-Education 201 or permission of the instructor. 

221. Children's Literature and Reading. (5) A survey of the types of literature 
appropriate for the intermediate grades and an investigation of the basic problems in 
reading. 

222. The Arts in the Intermediate Grades, (4) The development of skills in music, fine 
arts, and basic physical activities appropriate to the intermediate grades. 

223. Health and Physical Education for the Intermediate Grades. (4) The development 

of physical education skills appropriate for the intermediate grade teacher and an 
understanding of the personal and community health needs appropriate for the grade 
level. 

251. Student Teaching. (6) Observation and experience in school-related activities. 
Supervised student teaching. Graded Pass/Fail. P-Education 201 and permission of 
the instructor. 

271. Introduction to Geography. (4) A study ol the physical environment and its 
relationship to man, including an examination of climate, vegetation, soils, water 
resources, and land lorms found in various regions throughout the world. 

272. Geography Study Tour. (4) A guided tour of selected areas to study physical, 
economic, and cultural environments and their influence on man. Background 
references for reading are suggested prior to the tour. 

291. Methods and Materials. (4) Methods, materials, and techniques used in teaching 
the various subjects. P-Education 201 and permission of the instructor. 

Teaching of English. Fall. 

Teaching of Foreign Language. Spring. 

Teaching of Mathematics. Spring. 

Teaching of Music. Fall. 

Teaching of Physical Education and Health. Spring. 

Teaching of Science. Fall. 

Teaching of Social Studies. Fall. 

Teaching of Speech Communication. Spring. 

Teaching of Theatre Arts. Fall. 

293. Intermediate School Curriculum: Theory and Practice. (3) General principles of 
curriculum construction and teaching methods. Introduction to the use of 
audiovisual materials and equipment. 

295. Methods and Materials for Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies. (3) A 

survey of the basic materials, methods, and techniques of teaching the language arts 
and social studies in the intermediate grades. P-Permission of the instructor. 

296. Methods and Materials for Teaching Science and Mathematics. (3) A survey of the 
basic materials, methods, and techniques of teaching science and mathematics in the 
intermediate grades. P-Permission of the instructor. 

301. Audiovisual Education. (4) Introduction to the field of audiovisual education, 



development, and application of skills in the use ol instructional materials, 
equipment, and programs. 

302. Production of Instructional Materials. (4) Methods of producing instructional 
materials and other technological techniques. P-Education 301. 

303. History of Western Education. (4) Educational theory and practice from ancient 
times through the modern period, including American education. 

304. Theories of Education. (4) Contemporary proposals for educational theory and 
practice studied in the context of social issues. 

306. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Education. (4) A study of selected 
historical eras, influential thinkers, or crucial problems in education. Topics 
announced annually. 

313. Human Growth and Development. (4) Theories of childhood and adolescent 
development and their educational implications physically, intellectually, 
emotionally, socially, and morally. 

323. Educational Statistics. (4) Descriptive, inferential, and nonparametric statistical 
procedures involved in educational research. Not open to students who have taken 
Psychology 211 and 212. P-Permission of the instructor. 

331. The School and Teaching. (4) Organization of the school system; bases of 
education; the curriculum; major problems of education and teaching; the role of the 
teacher; psychological aspects of teaching. P-Education 201 and permission of the 
instructor. 

341. Principles of Counseling and Guidance. (4) Counseling history, philosophy, 

theory, procedure, and process. Therapeutic and developmental counseling 
approaches in guidance and personnel woi k in education, social, business, and 
community sen ice agenc ies. 

383. Reading in the Content Areas. (2) The course provides an introduction to 
teaching the basic reading skills at the intermediate and secondary level; vocabulary, 
comprehension, reading rate, selection of texts, and critical and interpretive reading. 
Particularly stressed are diagnoses of reading problems and techniques for correcting 
these problems in specific subject content areas. 

391. Teaching the Gifted. (4) A general investigation of the theory and practice which 
have special meaning for the gifted child, including an examination of general 
curriculum matters such as classroom styles, learning modes, epistemological 
theories, developmental constructs, and psychosociological patterns which have 
special pertinence to the teacher of the gifted. 

393. Individual Study (2, 4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available in the 
Department of Education; permitted upon departmental approval of petition 
presented by a qualified student. 



83 



English 

Robert N. Shorter, Chairman 

Professors John A. Carter Jr., Thomas F. Gossett, Alonzo VV. Kenion, Elizabeth 

Phillips, Lee Harris Potter, Robert N. Shorter, Edwin Graves Wilson 

Associate Professors Doyle R. Fosso, W. Dillon Johnston, Robert W. Lovett 

Assistant Professors Andrew V. Ettin, R. Edward Lobb, William M. Moss, Nancy C. 

Pearse, Beulah L. Raynor, Michael Roman, Laura P. Rice-Sayre, Henry M. Sayre, 

Blanche C. Speer 

Lecturers Dolly A. McPherson, Jay Meek, Bynum G. Shaw 

Instructors Patricia Adams Johnson, R. Lance Snyder, William A. Wilson 

The prerequisite for all advanced courses in English is any one of the courses in 
English and American literature numbered 160, 165, 170, or 175, all of which are 
offered each semester. Courses in journalism and writing, beyond the basic 
requirement of freshman composition, are offered as related subjects in the 
department. They may be taken as electives regardless of the field of study in which a 
student majors. 

The major in English requires a minimum of thirty-six credits, at least twenty-eight 
of which must be earned in courses in literature numbered 300 and above. Majors must 
take a course in Shakespeare, one 300-level course in American literature, and four 
additional 300-level courses in English literature before 1900, at least two of which 
must be in literature before 1800. They must take one of the 300-level courses 
designated by the department as a seminar. Majors and their advisers plan 
programs to meet these requirements and to insure that the student does some work in 
the major literary types. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in English. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
English," they must meet the minimum requirement of 3.5 in the major and complete 
the requirements for English 388. For additional information members of the 
departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Unless otherwise indicated, any course in English may carry either three or four 
credits according to the number of class meetings. The amount of reading and writing 
is adjusted to the assigned credit for the course. 

Lower Division Courses 

*11. Composition Review. (0) Essentials of standard usage and the basic principles of 
composition; frequent exercises. 



*Proficiency in the use of the English language is recognized by the faculty as a requirement m all 
departments. A composition condition, indicated by cc under the grade for any course, may be 
assigned in any department to a student whose uniting is unsatisfactory, regardless of previous 
credits in composition. The writing of transfer students is checked during the orientation period 
each term, and students whose writing is deficient are given a composition condition. For 
remoiial of a composition condition the student is required to take English 11 during the first 
semester for which he or she registers following the assignment of the cc. Removal of the 
deficiency is prerequisite to graduation. 



HI 



105. English Fundamentals. (2) Training in the fundamentals of written English. 
Satisfactory completion required for entry into English 1 10. Admission by placement 
only; does not satisfy the basic composition requirement. 

*110. English Composition. (4) Training in expository writing; frequent essays 
based upon readings. 

*112. English Composition and Literature. (3 or 4) Training in expository writing 
based on the reading of literature. P-Permission of the department. 

160. Survey of Major British Writers. (3 or 4) Eight to ten writers representing different 
periods and genres; primarily lecture. 

165. Studies in Major British Writers. (3 or 4) Three to five writers representing 
different periods; primarily discussion with frequent short papers. Limited 
enrollment. 

170. Survey of Major American Writers. (3 or 4) Nine to eleven writers representing 
different periods and genres; primarily lecture. 

175. Studies in Major American Writers. (3 or 4) Three to five writers representing 
different periods; primarily discussion with frequent short papers. Limited 
enrollment. 

180. Traditions of Humanity: The Liberal Arts. (2) A study of major concepts of liberal 
education in the Western world. 

255. Recent American Poetry. (3) Selections from the poetry of Robert Penn Warren, 
Randal] Jarrell, A. R. Amnions, James Dickey, Adrienne Rich, and Denise Levertov. 

299. Individual Study. (3 or 4) A course of independent study with faculty guidance. By 
pre-arrangement. 

January Courses** 

1 16. The Grotesque in Literature: Dream Fugues and Dark Confessions. (4) A study of 
representative literature, primarily novels from the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries, which provides the basis for an aesthetic of the grotesque. 

168. Contemporary Narrative. (4) A study of how stories are told in a contemporary 
world where conventional narrative techniques, fictional or otherwise, no longer seem 
adequately to describe our experience. 

236. Fielding, Hogarth, and Handel: Three Contemporary Artists. (4) A study of a 
novelist, a painter and engraver, and a musician of eighteenth century London who 
express similar ideas and taste. 

265. The Novel in Africa. (4) A study of post-World War II African novelists as they 
focus on recurrent themes of personal identity, conflict of cultures, and social change. 



*Either 110 or 112 is a prerequisite for all other courses in English unless the basic requirement 
is waived. Either course fulfills the basic course requirement. 

**These courses, representative of the January c urriculum, are not necessarily repeated every year 
but were offered in l c >78. 



85 



267. Edgar Allan Poe and Robert Frost. (4) A study of the relationships, the common 
traits, and the differences of two popular and critically acclaimed American poets. 

352. The Historical Novel: Fact and Fiction. (4) An examination of the paradoxical 
and contradictory relationship between fact and fiction in five novels depicting 
different periods of history. 

Journalism and Writing Courses 

270. Introduction to Journalism. (3 or 4) Survey of the fundamental principles of 
news-gathering and news-writing; study of news and news values, with some attention 
to representative newspapers. 

272. Editing. (3 or 4) A laboratory course in copy-editing, headline-writing, 
typography, and make-up; inc hides both newspaper and magazine editing. P-English 
270. 

276. Advanced Journalism. (3 or 4) Intensive practice in writing various types of 
newspaper stories, including the feature article. Limited to students planning careers 
in journalism. P-English 270. 

278. History of Journalism. (3 or 4) A study of the development of American 
journalism and its English origin; detailed investigations of representative world 
papers. 

284. The Essay. (2) Primarily for those interested in writing for publication, with 
concentration on writing various types of essays. P-Permission of the instructor. 

285. Poetry Workshop. (2) A laboratory course in the writing of verse. Study of poetic 
techniques and forms as well as works of contemporary poets. Frequent individual 
conferences. 

286. Short Story Workshop. (2) A study of the fundamental principles of short 
fiction writing; practice in writing, extensive study of short story form. P-Permission 
of the instructor. 

383, 384. Theory and Practice of Verse Writing. (4, 4) Emphasis on reading and 
discussing student poems in terms of craftsmanship and general principles. 

Advanced Language and Literature Courses 

304. History of the English Language. (3 cor 4) A survey of the development of English 
syntax, morphology, and phonology from Old English to the present, with attention 
to vocabulary growth. 

310. Studies in Medieval Literature. (3 or 4) Selected readings from areas such as 
religious drama, non-dramatic religious literature, romance literature, literary theory, 
and philosophy. 

315. Chaucer. (3 or 4) Emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, 
with some attention to long minor poems. Consideration of literary, social, religious, 
and philosophical background. 

320. English Drama to 1642. (3 or 4) English drama from its beginning to 1642, 



86 



exclusive of Shakespeare. Representative cycle plays, moralities, Elizabethan and 
Jacobean tragedies, comedies, and tragicomedies. 

323. Shakespeare. (3 or 4) Twelve representative plays illustrating Shakespeare's 
development as a poet and dramatist. 

325. Studies in English Literature, 1500-1660. (3 or 4) Selected topics, prose, and poetry 
from the sixteenth or seventeenth centuries, exclusive of drama and Milton. Emphasis 
on Elizabethan lyrics and Spenser or on Donne and the Metaphysical poets. 

327. Milton. (3 or 4) The poetry and selected prose of John Milton, with emphasis on 
Paradise Lost. 

330. English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3 or 4) Representative poetry and 
prose, exclusive of the novel, 1700-1800, drawn from Addison, Steele, Defoe, Swift, 
Pope, Johnson, Boswell, Goldsmith, and Burns. Consideration of cultural 
backgrounds and significant literary trends. 

332. Satire. (3 or 4) The nature of the satiric form and the satiric spirit as revealed 
through reading and critical analysis of significant examples, mostly English and 
American. 

335. Eighteenth Century Fiction. (3 or 4) Primarily the fiction of Defoe, Richardson, 
Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and Austen. 

350. Romantic Poets. (3 or 4) A review of the beginnings of Romantic ism in English 
literature, followed by study of Wordsworth. Coleridge, Byron, Keats, and Shelley; 
collateral reading in the prose of the period. 

353. The Nineteenth Century English Novel. (3 or 4) Representative major works by 
Dickens, Eliot, Thackeray, Hardy, the Brontes, and others. 

354. Victorian Poetry. (3 or 4) A study of Tennyson, Browning, Hopkins, and Arnold 
or another Victorian poet. 

360. Studies in Victorian Literature. (3 or 4) Selected topics, such as development of 
genres, major texts, and cultural influences. Readings in poetry, fiction, 
autobiography, and other prose. 

362. Blake, Yeats, and Thomas. (3 or 4) Reading and critical analysis of the poetry of 
Blake, Yeats, and Dylan Thomas; study of the plays of Yeats and his contemporaries in 
the Irish Renaissance, especially Synge and Lady Gregory. 

364. Studies in Literary Criticism. (3 or 4) Consideration of certain figures and schools 
of thought significant in the history of literary criticism. 

365. Twentieth Century British Fiction. (3 or 4) A study of Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, 
Forster, Woolf, and later English writers, with attention to their social and intellectual 
backgrounds. 

367. Twentieth Century Poetry. (3 or 4) Selected American and British poets from 1900 
to 1965. 

368. Studies in Irish Literature. (3 or 4) Critical readings of the works of major Irish 
writers within the context of the political, social, and literary history of Ireland. 



87 



369. Modern Drama. (3 or 4) Modern drama from its late nineteenth century naturalist 
beginnings to the contemporary existentialist/absurdist theater. 

372. American Romanticism. (3 or 4) Writers of the mid-nineteenth century, including 
Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Melville. 

374. Intellectual and Social Movements in American Literature to 1865. (3 or 4) 
Selected topics such as Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Transcendentalism, and 
Romantic ism. 

376. American Poetry from 1855 to 1900. (3 or 4) Readings from at least two of the 
following poets: Whitman, Dickinson, Melville. 

378. Literature of the South. (3 or 4) The aesthetic, philosophical, and sociological 
dimensions of the best literature of the South, from the colonial to the contemporary 
period. Writers to include the regional humorists, Faulkner, Ransom, and Tennessee 
Williams. 

380. American Fiction from 1865 to 1915. (3 or 4) Such writers as Twain, James, 
Howells, Crane, Dreiser, Wharton, and Cather. 

381. Studies in Black Literature. (3 or 4) Reading and critical analysis of selected 
fiction, poetry, drama, and other writing by representative black Americans. 

382. Modern American Fiction, 1915 to the Present. (3 or 4) To include such writers as 
Lewis, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Wolfe, Wright, Katherine Anne 
Porter, Mailer, Bellow, Malamud, Flannery O'Connor, Baldwin, and Styron. 

386. Directed Reading. (3 or 4) A tutorial in an area of study not otherwise provided by 
the department; granted upon departmental approval of petition presented by a 
qualified student. 

388. Honors in English. (3 or 4) A conference course centering upon a special reading 
requirement and a thesis requirement. For senior students wishing to graduate with 
"Honors in English." 

389. The Use of the Library in Literary Research. (2) Attention to materials, methods, 
and bibliography for the study of literature. 

390. The Structure of English. (3 or 4) An introduction to the principles and 
techniques of modern linguistics applied to contemporary American English. 

German 

Wilmer D. Sanders, Chairman 

Professors Ralph S. Fraser, James C. O'Flaherty 

Associate Professors Wilmer D. Sanders, Larry E. West, Timothy F. Sellner 

A major in German requires thirty-seven credits beyond German 111-112 and 
should include 281 and 285. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in German. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
German," they must complete a senior research project and pass a comprehensive 
examination. For additional information members of the departmental faculty should 



be consulted. 

Attention is called to the exchange program with the Free University of Berlin. 

Ill, 112. Elementary German. (4, 4) This course covers the principles of grammar and 
pronunciation and includes the reading of simple texts. Lab-one hour. 

150. Man spricht Deutsch auch in Oesterreich. (4) Three weeks of intensive language 
and cultural study in Vienna, Austria. Travel to Salzburg and Munich. Offered in 
January. P-One semester of German. 

152. Intermediate German. (4) The principles of grammar are reviewed; reading of 
selected prose and poetry. Lab-one hour. P-Three years of high school German. 

153. Intermediate German. (5) The principles of grammar are reviewed; reading of 
selected prose and poetry. Lab-one hour. P-German 111, 112. 

211, 212. Introduction to German Literature. (4, 4) The object of this course is to 
acquaint the student with masterpieces of German literature. Parallel reading and 
reports. P-German 152 or 153. 

216. Basic Conversation: Level One. (4) Intensive practice of speech patterns; daily 
sessions, language laboratory practice. Offered in January. P-German 1 1 1 or 1 12 with 
grade of C or better. 

217. Conversation and Phonetics. (4) A course in spoken German emphasizing facility 
of expression. Considerable attention is devoted to phonetics. P-German. 152, 153, or 
equivalent. 

218. Composition and Grammar Review. (4) A review of the fundamentals of German 
grammar with intensive practice in translation and composition. P-German 152 or 
153 or equivalent. 

219. Advanced Composition. (4) A study of advanced grammar and composition. 
English texts translated into German in addition to free composition in German. 
P-German 218 or equivalent. 

220. German Civilization. (4) A survey of contemporary German culture, including a 
study of its historical development in broad outline. The course is conducted in 
German. P-German 217 or permission of the instructor. 

222. Nietzsche in Translation. (4) Intensive study of selections from Nietzsche's works, 
with emphasis on his development as a writer and thinker. Offered in January. 
P-Sophomore, junior, or senior standing. 

231. Weimar Germany. (3) Historical and literary examination of Weimar Germany, 
1919-1933. Authors include Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Grimm, Juenger, Tohst, 
Hesse, Doeblin, Brecht, Kafka, Tucholsky, Fallada, and Stefan Zweig. German or 
history credit determined at registration. 

249. Old High German and Middle High German Literature. (4) The study of major 
writers and works from these two areas; emphasizes major writings of the chivalric 
period. P-German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

250. Renaissance, Reformation, and Baroque German Literature. (4) A study of major 
writers and works from the post-chivalric period to approximately 1700. P-German 



89 



211, 212, or equivalent. 

253. Eighteenth Century German Literature. (4) A study ol major writers and works of 
the Enlightenment and Sturm und Drang. P-German 211, 212, or equivalent.. 

263. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century I. (4) Poetry, prose, dramas, and 
critical works from approximately 1795 to 18 18. P-German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

264. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century II. (4) Readings from the 
beginnings ol poetic realism to the advent ol Naturalism. P-German 211, 212, oi 
equivalent. 

270. Individual Study. (3) Studies in literature not ordinarily read in other courses. P- 
German 211, 212, and permission of the instructor. 

281. Seminar: Twentieth Century Prose. (4) Intensive study ol certain works by 
Thomas Mann, Hesse, and Raika, plus considerable outside reading. P-German 211, 

212, or equivalent. 

285. Seminar in Goethe. (4) Faust Pan I studied in class. Parallel readings in othei 
works by Goethe assigned. P-German 21 1, 212, oi equivalent. 

287-288. Honors in German. (3, 3) A conferenc e course in German literature. A major 
research paper is required. Designed for candidates lor departmental honors. 

History 

Richard L. Zuber, Chairman 

Professors Richard C. Barnett, Cyclone Covey, 

Balkrishna Govind Gokhale, J. Edwin Hendricks, Thomas E. Mullen, 

Percival Perry, David L. Smiley, Henry Smith Stroupe, Lowell R. Tillett, 

W. Buck Yearns, Richard L. Zuber 

Associate Professors James P. Barefield, Merrill G. Berthrong, David VV. Hadley, 

James G. McDowell, Michael L. Sinclair, J. Howell Smith 

Assistant Professors Louise Hoffman, Alan J. Williams 

The major in history consists of a minimum of thirty-six credits. It must include 
History 310, from six to eight credits in United States history, from six to eight credits 
in European history, and three or tour credits in non-Western history. No more than 
two courses from History 111, 112, 113 may be counted toward the major. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in history. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
History," they must complete satisfactorily History 287 and 288. For additional 
information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Students contemplating graduate study should take historiography and should 
acquire a reading knowledge of oire modern foreign language (preferably French, 
German, or Russian) for the M.A. degree and two for the Ph.D. degree. (For 
information regarding the Master of Arts degree in history at the University, see the 
bulletin of the Graduate School.) 

111. Europe from the Renaissance to 1789. (4) A survey. 

112. Europe from 1789 to 1914. (4) A survey. 



90 



113. Europe and the Twentieth Century World. (4) A survey from 1914 to the present. 

131. European Historical Biography. (2) Study of biographies of several men and 
women who have influenced the history and civilization of Europe. 

151, 152. The United States. (4, 4) Political, social, economic, and intellectual aspects: 
151, before 1865; 152. after 1865. 

160. Freud. (4) An investigation of Freud's basic ideas in the context of his time. Books 
to be read include The Interpretation of Dreams, Civilization and Its Discontents, and 
Jones's biography in the Trilling abridgment. 

162. From the Forest of Wake to the Red Hills of Forsyth: The History of Wake Forest 
University. (4) A survey of the history of Wake Forest from its beginning. To include 
reading assignments, lectures, and talks from those who remember life on the old 
campus, a look at the oral and written history project now in progress, and a brief visit 
to the town of Wake Forest. Offered in January. 

163. Russian History and Culture from the Source. (4) A study tour of historic sites and 
cultural centers of the Soviet Union. Offered in January. 

164. The American People and China. (4) A topical study of the images and attitudes of 
Americans toward China. All students read John K. Fairbank's The United States and 
China and A. T. Steel's The American People and China, after which they select 
individual topics on which to present oral reports. Additional readings stress 
conflicting interpretations of major issues in Sino-American relations. 

165. Contemporary Conflict. (4) A study of the background of four conflicts to be 
studied as selected by the class members. 

166. Era of Individualism, 1954-1966. (4) An intensive study of the period 1954-1966, 
during which privileged, prosperous Americans shared in seeking civil and personal 
rights for the freshly rediscovered deprived minorities. A nostalgic examination of the 
time of optimism between McCarthyism and the rise of the Nixonian "Silent 
Majority," when there was hope that a society could provide both equal opportunity 
to all its citizens and special rewards for the citizens who excelled individually. Much 
responsible student participation is expected, with the possibility of an exam. No 
limit, but size of class influences type of instruction. Pass/Fail. Usually offered in 
January. 

167. The American Revolution in the South. (4) Readings, lectures, discussions, and 
field trips relating to military, governmental, economic, social, and cultural aspects of 
the South, 1774-1783. North Carolina emphasized. Groups and/or private field 
excursions to Revolutionary sites conducted under the supervision of the instructor. A 
research project and report required. Pass/Fail. Usually offered in January. P- 
Permission of the instructor. 

211. Colloquium. (1-4) 

215, 216. The Ancient World. (4, 3 or 4) Critical focus on the Greeks in the fall and 
Romans in the spring, but in global context of palelolithic to medieval; 
psychological /philosophical emphasis. 



221. The Middle Ages. (4) A survey of European history, 400-1300, stressing social and 
cultural developments. 

222. The Renaissance and Reformation. (4) Europe from 1300 to 1600. Social, cultural, 
and intellectual developments stressed. Students may take either segment of the course 
separately. 

223. The Renaissance. (2) (See 222 for description.) 

224. The Reformation. (2) (See 222 for description.) 

231. Weimar Germany. (3) Historical and literary examination of Weimar Germany, 
1919-1933. Authors include Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Hans Grimm, Juenger, 
Johst, Hesse, Doehlin, Brecht, Kafka, I'uc holsky, Eallada, and Stefan Zweig. German 
or history credit determined at registration. 

232. European Historical Novels. (2) Study of the accuracy and value, from the 
standpoint of the historian, of a selection of historical novels. 

240. Afro- American History. (4) The role of Afro-Americans in the development of the 
United States, with particular attention to African heritage, forced migration, 
Americanization, and influence. 

264. Economic History of the United States. (3) The economic development oi the 
United States from colonial beginnings to the present. 

265. American Diplomatic History. (4) An introduction to the history of American 
diplomacy since 1776, emphasizing the effects of public opinion on fundamental 
policies. 

271. Colonial Latin America, 1492-1825. (4) Cultural configurational approach. 

287, 288. Honors in History. (4, 4) First semester, seminar on problems of historical 
synthesis and interpretation; second semester, writing of a major paper and 
examination on a special field. 

310. Seminar. (4) Offered by members of the faculty on topics of their choice. A paper is 
required. 

311, 312. Social and Intellectual History of Modern Europe. (4, 4) Intellectual trends in 
Western European civilization. Fall, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; spring, 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

316. France and England in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. (4) The structure ot 
society, the nature of law, church/state relations, and intellectual developments. P- 
History 221 or permission of the instructor. 

319, 320. Germany. (4, 4) Fall, origins of the German nation and the rise of Prussia in a 
context of particularism; spring, from World War I to divided Germany. 

321, 322. France. (4, 4) Fall, from prehistoric Gaul to 1788, with particular emphasis 
on the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries; spring, 1788 to the present. 

323, 324. England. (4, 4) A political and social survey, with some attention to 
continental movements. Fall, to 1603; spring, 1603 to present. 

325. Tudor and Early Stuart England. (4) A constitutional and social study of England 



92 



from 1485 to 1641. 

329, 330. Modern England. (4, 4) Political, social economic, and cultural history of 
England since 1714. Fall, to 1815; spring, since 1815. 

331, 332. Russia. (1, 4) Primarily political, with some attention to cultural and social 
developments. Fall, the Russian Empire; spring, the Soviet Union. 

333. European Diplomatic History, 1848-1914. (1) Research discussion seminar, with 
emphasis on topics from the Bismarck era. 

339. Women in European History. (3 or 4) The evolution of women's social roles, 
attitudes toward women, and feminist activities in the context of the social, economic, 
political, and intellectual history ot modern Europe. 

341. Southeast Asia from 1511 to the Present. (4) A survey of the history and c ultureof 
Southeast Asia under Western colonial systems, with special reference to economic , 
social, and cultural developments, the rise of nationalism, and the emergence of new 
nation-states. 

342. The Middle East from Suleiman the Magnificent to the Present. (4) Major subjects 
covered are the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Arabs and Persians under 
Ottoman hegemony, the rise of Arab nationalism, and the emergence of the modern 
Arab states and their roles in the post-World War II era. 

343. Imperial China. (4) Development of traditional institutions in Chinese society to 
1644; attention to social, cultural, and political factors, emphasizing continuity and 
resistance to change. 

344. Modern China. (4) The Manchu Dynasty and its response to the Western 
challenge, the 1911 Revolution, the warlord era and the rise of the Communists, 
Chinese Communist society, and the Cultural Revolution. 

345. 346. History and Civilization of South Asia. (4,4) An introduction to the history 
and civilization of South Asia. Emphasis on historical developments in the social, 
economic, and cultural life of the area. 

347. India in Western Literatures. (4) A one-semester historical survey of images of 
India in Western literatures, with special reference to religious and philosophical 
ideas, art, polity, society, and culture. 

349, 350. East Asia. (4,4) An introduction to the social, cultural, and political 
development of China, Japan, and Korea. Fall, to 1600; spring, since 1600. 

351, 352. American Society and Thought. (4,4) A non-political topical survey of 
American culture and lifestyles. Topics include religion, science, education, 
architecture, and immigration. 

353. Colonial English America, 1582-1774. (4) Determinative episodes, figures, 
allegiances, apperceptions, and results of the period, organically considered. 

354. Revolutionary and Early National America, 1763-1820. (4) The American 
Revolution, its causes and effects, the Confederation, the Constitution, and the new 
nation. 



93 



355. The Westward Movement. (4) The role of the frontier in United States history, 
1753-1890. 

356. Jacksonian America, 1820-1850. (4) The United States in the age of Jackson, Clay, 
Calhoun, and Webster. A biographical approach. 

357. The Civil War and Reconstruction. (4) The political and military events of the 
war and the economic, social, and political readjustments which followed. 

358. The United States from Reconstruction to World War I. (4) National progress and 
problems during an era of rapid industrialization. 

359. Twentieth Century America I. (4) The transition of America from World War I to 
the eve of World War II, with special emphasis on the Roaring Twenties and the New 
Deal. 

360. Twentieth Century America II. (4) Recent United States developments from Pearl 
Harbor to the eve of the present. 

362. American Constitutional History. (4) Origins of the Constitution, the 
controversies involving the nature of the Union, and constitutional readjustments to 
meet the new American industrialism. 

363, 364. The South. (4, 4) Geography, population elements, basic institutions, and 
selected events. 

365. Women in American History. (4) A survey of the roles and activities of women in 
America, with emphasis upon selected individuals. 

366. Studies in Historic Preservation. (4 ) An analysis of history museums and agencies 
and of the techniques of preserving and interpreting history through artifacts, 
restorations, and reconstructions. P-Permission of the instructor. 

367. 368. North Carolina. (4, 4) Selected phases of the development of North Carolina 
from the colonial beginnings to the present. Fall, to 1789; spring, since 1789. 

391, 392. Historiography. (4. 3) The principal historians and their writings from 
ancient times to the present. Fall, European historiography; spring, American 
historigraphy. 

398. Individual Study. (4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available in the 
department; permitted upon departmental approval of petition presented by a 
qualified student. 

399. Directed Reading. (1-4) 

Humanities 

N. Rick Heatley, Coordinator 

163. The Baroque World View. (4) This course examines man's self-view during the 
Baroque period through a study of a small number of the period's cultural 
manifestations, such as opera, religious architecture, meditative poetry, table 
manners, and demonology. Works by Monteverdi, Rubens, Corneille, and 
Shakespeare, among others, are considered. All readings are in English, although 



94 



students with a knowledge of a foreign language are encouraged to use that 
knowledge. Offered in January. 

165. Black African Literature. (4) A general introductory course. Study of the origins 
and development of black African literature. Analysis of representative works of 
poetry, fiction, and essays. Readings and classes in English; originals in French also 
available for majors. Discussions, occasional lectures, reports, and papers. Offered in 
January. 

213. Studies in European Literature. (4) A study of approximately twelve works in 
translation, taken from European literature. Satisfies a Division I requirement. 

214. Contemporary Fiction. (4) A study of contemporary European and Latin 
American fiction in translation. Satisfies a Division I requirement. 

215. Germanic and Slavic Literature. (4) A study of approximately twelve works in 
translation taken from Germanic and Slavic literatures. Satisfies a Division I 
requirement. 

216. Romance Literature. (4) A study of approximately twelve works in translation 
taken from Romance literatures. Offered in alternate years. Satisfies a Division I 
requirement. 

217. European Drama. (4) A study of selected works in translation, from the 
seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, by majoi Continental dramatists. Satisfies a 
Division I requirement. 

225. Nineteenth Century Romanticism: Philosophy and Art. (4) A study of the 
Romantic motif as expressed in the philosophy and art of Europe and the United 
States in the nineteenth century. 

227. Issues in Nineteenth Century America. (4) An interdisciplinary study of 
nineteenth century American culture, including art, literature, music, and 
philosophy, as it reflects and gives insight into some issues crucial to the developing 
nation. 

250. Discovering the Visual and Verbal Modes of the Twentieth Century. (4) An 

exploration of the ideas, values, and feelings found in the art and literature of 
representative twentieth century figures: Kandinsky, Stevens, Picasso, Kafka, Leger, 
Beckett, Klee, Ionesco, Pollock, Faulkner, Chagall, Barth. and others. 

261. Great Britain Since World War II: A Pattern for the United States? (2) Topics 
include the history of the period, the political structure, the crisis in the British 
economy, the social structure, drama, novels, and cinema in Great Britain. Not 
available for credit toward major except by approval of individual departments. 
Pass Fail only. 

350. What the Arts Have Been Saying Since 1800. (4) An experiment in developing 
interpretive judgment and insight regarding music, painting, and literature as 
articulations of the frontier consciousness of the period. 

358. An Editor Looks at the Rights of American Citizens, 1965-1976. (3) Current 
developments in the field of constitutional rights as seen by a newspaper editor. 



95 



373. France in the Thirties: Literature and Social Consciousness. (4) A study in 
English of Malraux, Giraudoux, Celine, Bernanos, and St. Exupery. 

374. French Literature in the Mid-Twentieth Century. (4) A study of the literature of 
the forties and fifties and its evolution from "commitment" to "disengagement." 
Authors include Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Robbe-Grillet, Genet, and Duras. 

375. The French Theatre between 1920 and 1960: Theory and Practice. Study of works 
by Giraudoux, Cocteau, Anouilh, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Ionesco, and Genet. 

378. The Evolution of Autobiography as a Literary Form. (4) A study of 
autobiography as a form of fiction. Reading of Rousseau's Confessions and selected 
autobiographies of twentieth century French authors. Taught in English. 

379. The Literary Works of Jean Paul Sartre. (4) A critical study of Sartre's evolution as 
reflected in his novels and plays from Nausea to The Prisoners of Altona. 

380. Albert Camus. (3) A critical study of Camus' evolution as a writer. 

Interdisciplinary Honors 

Paul M. Gross Jr., Coordinator 

A series of seminar courses of an interdisciplinary nature are open to qualified 
students in the College. Students interested in admission to these seminars, supervised 
by the Committee on Honors, should consult the coordinator or a member of the 
committee. 

Students who choose to participate in as many as four interdisciplinary seminars 
and who have a superior record may elect Honors 281, directed study culminating in 
an honors paper and an oral examination. Those whose work has been superior in this 
course and who have achieved an overall grade point average of at least 3.0 in all 
college work may be graduated with the distinction "Honors in the Arts and 
Sciences." (Students who choose to be candidates for departmental honors may not 
also be candidates for "Honors in the Arts and Sciences.") 

Able students are normally encouraged to choose a departmental honors program 
rather than "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." As a result, most students only elect to 
participate in one or two interdisciplinary seminars in which they are particularly 
interested. The faculty participants for these seminars represent diverse academic 
disciplines. 

131, 132. Approaches to Human Experience I. (4, 4) An inquiry into the nature and 
interrelationships of several approaches to man's experience, represented by the work 
of three such minds as Leonardo da Vinci, Dante, Newton, Gandhi, Confucius, 
Dostoevsky, Descartes, Goya, Mozart, Jefferson, and Bohr. Seminar discussion based 
on primary and secondary sources, including musical works and paintings. Written 
reports and a term paper required. Offered in alternate years. 

133, 134. Approaches to Human Experience II. (4, 4) A parallel course to Honors 131, 

132, concentrating on the work of a different set of figures such as Buber, Galileo, 
Keynes, Pascal, Camus, Picasso, Ibsen, Tagore, Sophocles, and Bach. Offered in 
alternate years. 



96 



*233. Darwinism and the Modern World. (4) A study of the Darwinian theory of 
evolution and the impact of evolutionary thought on fields such as economics, 
politics, psychology, literature and the other arts, and philosophy. 

*235. The Ideal Society. (4) Man's effort to establish or imagine the ideal community, 
state, or society; principles of political and social organization; changing goals and 
values. 

*237. The Scientific Outlook. (4) An exploration of the origins and development of the 
scientific method and some of its contemporary applications in the natural and social 
sciences and the humanities. 

*238. Romanticism. (4) Romanticism as a recurrent characteristic of mind and art and 
as a specific historical movement in Europe and America in the late eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries. Emphasis on primary materials in philosophy, literature, 
music, and painting. 

*239. Man and the Irrational. (4) The phenomenon of the irrational, with emphasis on 
its twentieth century manifestations but with attention also to its presence in other 
centuries and cultures. Philosophy, religion, literature, psychology, politics, and the 
arts are explored. 

*241. The Tragic View. (4) The theory of tragedy in ancient and modern times; the 
expression of the tragic in literature, art, music, theatre, and film. 

*242. The Comic View. (4) The theory of comedy in ancient and modern times; the 
expression of the comic spirit in literature, art, music, theatre, and film. 

*244. Man and the Structure of the Universe. (4) An investigation of various 
conceptions of the universe and their implications for man. Study not necessarily 
limited to the cosmologies of Ptolemy, Copernicus, and their modern successors, but 
may also include theories such as the Babylonian, Mayan, and Taoist. 

*246. Man and the Environment. (4) An interdisciplinary examination of man and 
society in relation to the environment. 

281. Directed Study. (4) Readings on an interdisciplinary topic approved by the 
Committee on Honors; preparation of a major research or interpretive paper based on 
these leadings, under the direction of a faculty member; an oral examination on the 
topic, administered by the faculty supervisor and the Committee on Honors. Eligible 
students who wish to take this course must submit a written request to the Committee 
on Honors by the end of the junior year. (Not open to candidates for departmental 
honors.) 



*One or more offered each year at the discretion of the Committee on Honors. 



l >7 



Mathematics 

Ivey C. Gentry, Chairman 

Professors Ivey C. Gentry, John W. Sawyer, Ben M. Seelbinder, Marcel 1 us E. Waddill 

Associate Professors John. V. Baxley, Richard D. Carmichael, Fredric T. Howard, 

James Kuzmanovich, J. Gaylord May, W. Graham May 

Assistant Professor Elmer K. Hayashi 

Alfred Brauer Instructor Ellen E. Kirkman 

Instructors Richard A. Moore Jr., Margaret B. Seelbinder 

A major in mathematics requires forty credits. A student must include courses 111, 
112, 113, 121, 221, one of the courses 31 1,317, 352, 357, and at least two additional 300- 
level courses. A prospective teachei in the education block may take 231 in lieu ol the 
course from 311,317, 352, or 357. Lower division students are urged to consult a mem- 
ber of the department before enrolling in couises othei than those satisfying Division 
II requirements. 

A regularly scheduled activity in mathematics is an informal seminar of students 
and faculty on topics not discussed in regular couises (foi example, finite differences, 
game theory, Monte Carlo method, divergent series). 

The department, along with the Departments of Economics, Business and 
Accountancy, and Biology, offers several joint majors. The Departments of 
Mathematics and Economics offer a joint major leading to a Bachelor of Science 
degree in mathematical economics. This interdisciplinary program affords the 
student an opportunity to apply mathematical methods to the development ol 
economic theory, models, and quantitative analysis. The major consists of the 
following course requirements: Mathematics 111, 112, 113, 121, 251; Economics 151, 
152, 201, 202, 203; a joint seminar in mathematical economics; and three additional 
courses chosen with the approval of the program advisers. Recommended courses are 
Mathematics 253, 348, 353, 357, 358, and Economics 251. 242, 287, 288. Students 
electing the joint major must receive permission from both the Department of 
Economics and the Department of Mathematics. 

The Departments of Mathematics and Biology offer a joint major leading to a 
Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics-biology. This interdisciplinary program 
affords the student an opportunity to apply mathematical methods to the 
development and analysis of biological systems. The major consists of the following 
course requirements: Mathematics 112, 155, 157. or 357; Biology 150, 151, 152; and 
seven additional courses (at least three in each department) chosen with the approval 
of the program advisers. Recommended couises in Mathematics are 121 , 253, 256, 348, 
353, 355, 357. Students electing the joint major must receive permission from both the 
Department of Mathematics and the Department of Biology. 

The Departments of Mathematics and Business and Accountancy offer a joint major 
leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics-business. This 
interdisciplinary program prepares students for careers in business, with a strong 
background in mathematics. The major consists of the following course 
requirements: Mathematics 111, 112, 155, 157, 256, or 355; Accounting 111, 112; 
Business 211, 221, 231; either Business 201 or Mathematics 357; either Business 202 or 
Mathematics 253; and two additional courses chosen from Accounting 252, 278. 



98 



Business 281, Mathematics 121, 248, 353, 381, or specially designed January courses. 
Economics 151-152 is strongly recommended. Students electing the joint major must 
receive permission from both the Department of Mathematics and the Department of 
Business and Accountancy. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in mathematics or in the joint majors. To be graduated with 
the designation "Honors in Mathematics," "Honors in Mathematics-Biology," or 
"Honors in Mathematics-Business," they must complete satisfactorily a senior 
research paper and pass a comprehensive oral or written examination. For additional 
information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

105. Pre-Calculus Mathematics. (4) Selected topics deal with the structure of number 
systems and the elementary functions. Not to be counted toward the major in 
mathematics. Offered in January. 

Ill, 112, 113. Calculus with Analytic Geometry, I, II, III. (5, 5 or 4, 4) Differential and 
integral calculus and basic concepts of analytic geometry; multivariable calculus. No 
student allowed credit for both 116 and 111. Lab-two hours for 111, 112. 

115. Finite Mathematics. (5) Probability and statistics, matrices, linear programming, 
Markov chains, and theory of games. Lab-two hours. 

116. Essential Calculus. (5 or 4) A one-semester course in differential and integral 
calculus with application to business and the social sciences. No student allowed 
credit for both 1 16 and 1 1 1. A student who might take additional calculus should not 
take Mathematics 116. Lab-two hours. 

121. Linear Algebra. (4) Vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations and 
matrices, linear groups, and determinants. 

154. Computer Programming. (4) Introduction to computer programming and 
operation. No student allowed credit for both 154 and 155 without departmental 
approval. Offered in January. 

155. Introduction to FORTRAN Programming. (4) Lecture and laboratory. A study 
of FORTRAN language. Students use computer terminals as well as card input. No 
student allowed credit for both 154 and 155. 

156. Statistical Concepts. (4) An introductory course for the student of statistics who 
has a limited mathematical background. Includes descriptive techniques, frequency 
distributions, statistical inference, regression, and correlation. Emphasis is placed on 
how statistics can be used in society. No student allowed credit for both 156 and 157. 
Offered in Jariuary. 

157. Elementary Probability and Statistics. (5 or 4) Probability and distribution 
functions, means and variances, and sampling distributions. Lab-two hours. No 
student allowed credit for both 156 and 157. 

221. Modern Algebra I. (4) An introduction to modern abstract algebra through the 
study of groups, rings, integral domain, and fields. P-Mathematics 121. 

231. Euclidean Geometry. (4) Postulates, definitions, theorems, and models of 
Euclidean geometry. 



99 



251. Ordinary Differential Equations. (4 or 3) Linear equations with constant 
coefficients, linear equations with variable coefficients, and existence and uniqueness 
theorems for first order equations. P-Mathematics 112. 

253. Operations Research. (4) Mathematical models and optimization techniques. 
Studies in allocation, simulation, queuing, scheduling, and network analysis. P- 
Mathematics 111, 115, or equivalent. 

256. COBOL Programming. (4) Lecture and laboratory. A study of the elements of 
COBOL language. P-Mathematics 154 or 155. 

305S, 306S. Elementary Analysis for Teachers I, II. (4, 4) Concepts from differential 
and integral calculus for Advanced Placement teachers. All topics in the Calculus AB 
and BC courses are covered. 

311, 312. Advanced Calculus, I, II. (4, 4 or 3) Limits and continuity in metric spaces, 
differentiation and Riemann-Stieltjes integration, sequences and series, uniform 
convergence, power series and Fourier series, partial differentiation and functions of n 
real variables, implicit and inverse function theorem. P-Mathematics 113. 

317. Complex Analysis I. (4) Analytic functions, Cauchy's theorem and its 
consequences, power series, and residue calculus. P-Mathematics 113. 

322. Modern Algebra II. (4 or 3) A continuation of modern abstract algebra through 
the study of additional properties of group and fields and a thorough treatment of 
vector spaces. P-Mathematics 221. 

323, 324. Matrix Theory I, II. (4, 4 or 3) Basic concepts and theorems concerning 
matrices and real number functions defined on preferred sets of matrices. P- 
Mathematics 121. 

332. Non-Euclidean Geometry. (4 or 3) Postulates, definitions, theorems, and models 
of Lobachevskian and Riemannian geometry. 

345, 346. Elementary Theory of Numbers I, II. (4, 4 or 3) Properties of integers, 
congruences, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, sums of squares, magic squares, 
applications to elementary mathematics, quadratic residues, arithmetic theory of 
continued fractions. 

348. Combinatorial Analysis. (4 or 3) Enumeration techniques, including generating 
functions, recurrence formulas, the principle of inclusion and exclusion, and Polya's 
theorem. 

351. Applied Analysis. (4) Topics which have proven useful in the physical sciences, 
including vector analysis and complex analysis. 

352. Partial Differential Equations. (4) The separation of variables technique for the 
solution of the wave, heat, Laplace, and other partial differential equations, with the 
related study of the Fourier transform and the expansion of functions in Fourier, 
Legendre, and Bessel series. 

353. Mathematical Models. (4 or 3) Development and application of probabilistic and 
deterministic models. Fmphasis given to constructing models which represent 
systems in the social, behavioral, and management sciences. P-Mathematics 253. 



100 



355. Numerical Analysis. (4) A computer-oriented study of analytical methods in 
mathematics. Lecture and laboratory. P-Mathematics 112 and 154 or 155. 

357, 358. Mathematical Statistics I, II. (4, 4 or 3) Probability distributions, 
mathematical expectation, sampling distributions, estimation and testing of 
hypotheses, regression, correlation, and analysis of variance. P-Mathematics 113. 

361. Selected Topics. (2, 3, or 4) Topics in mathematics which are not considered in 
regular courses or which continue study begun in regular courses. Content varies. 

381. Individual Study. (2, 3, or 4) A choice of study in an area of individual interest 
directed by a faculty adviser. 

Military Science 

Lieutenant Colonel Anderson H. Walters, Professor 

Captain Edward L. Grant, Captain Floyd L. Griffin, 

Major Jesse C. Brackett Jr., Assistant Professors 

Master Sergeant Ezequiel B. Evaro, Sergeant Major Donald K. Vick 

111, 112. First Year Basic. (2, 2) ROTC and national defense; basic military skills. 
Enrichment subject required.* Lab.** 

151, 152. Second Year Basic. (2, 2) Leadership, styles, theoretical orientation in a 
contemporary military environment, and intermediate military skills. Enrichment 
subject required.* Lab.** 

211, 212. First Year Advanced. (2, 2) Small unit tactics, communications and military 
orienteering, military formations, and advanced military skills. Enrichment subject 
required.* Lab.** P-Credit for Basic. 

251, 252. Second Year Advanced. (2, 2) Planning and supervision of leadership 
laboratory program, active duty orientation, military administration, law, and 
logistics. Enrichment subject required.* Lab.** 



*This subject, either electwe or required, furthers the professional qualifications of 
the student as a prospective officer in the I '.S. Army. This does not require additional 
hours aboi'e and beyond the normal semester course requirements. In cases where a 
student is pursuing a discipline which is narrowly restricted with few electives, the 
PAIS can resolve any conflict in favor of the student's degree requirements. 

**Students elect to participate in various skill modules including but not limited to 
orienteering, mountaineering, marksmanship, tactical considerations of modern 
battle, and leadership. 



10] 



Music 

Annette LeSiege, Chairman 

Assistant Professors Christopher Giles, Richard Johnson, Annette LeSiege 

Director of Bands R. Davidson Burgess 

Lecturer and Director of Choirs John V. Mochnick 

Instructors Gilda Glazer, Lucille S. Harris, David B. Levy, Donna Mayer-Martin, 

Teresa Radomski, Janet Clyde Sawyer 

The major in music consists of a basic curriculum of thirty-eight credits: Music 
Theory 171-17-1 (twelve credits), Music History 181-181 (twelve credits), ten credits of 
applied music, and four semesters ol ensemble. 

The music majoi supplements this basic c tin ic ulum with ten additional c i edits by 
electing one of the following areas ol concentration or by devising an integrated course 
of study with another department: 

Music Theory. Electives: Music 271, 272, 27:5, 275, 276; Education 280, 282. 

Composition. Theory electives and or supplementary enrollment in Music 273. 

Music History. Electives: Music 211, 212, 215, 219, 220, 221. 222, 22.1, 221, 276; 
Education 280; selected courses in the Departments ol Ait and History. 

Church Musk. Music 221, 212; Education 282. 

Performance. Education 281 (music literature seminar); senior recital (additional 
applied music credits to be arranged); music theory history electives. 

Music Education. Music 185, 186. 187. 188; Education 280, 282. 284. 291. 

Highly qualified majors may be invited to apply for admission to the honors 
program in music. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Music," a 
candidate must complete one of the following requirements: (1) a senior research 
paper, (2) an original composition, or (3) an analytical lecture related to music 
performed by the candidate in a public recital. 

Any student interested in majoring in music should consult the chairman of the 
department as soon as possible after entering the University. 

Music Theory 

101. Introduction to the Language of Music. (3, 4) Basic theoretical concepts and 
musical terminology. Survey of musical styles, composers, and selected works from the 
Middle Ages through the twentieth century. For students not majoring in music. 

102. Language of Music. (3, 4) Study of major works from the Middle Ages through the 
twentieth century. For students not majoring in music. P-101 or permission of the 
instruc tor. 

105. Music Theory for Non-Majors (4) A study and application of music fundamentals 
and music theory for the non-music major. A combination of theoretical skills for 
analysis and stylistic composition (key signatures, scales, intervals, triads, seventh 
chords) and musical skills (sight singing, ear training, keyboard harmony). P-101 or 
permission of the instructor. 



102 



*171. Music Theory I. (3) Fundamentals. Theoretical and compositional techniques 
of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Sight-singing, analysis, and compositional 
practice in music to 1600. Introduction to sixteenth century counterpoint. 

* 1 72. Music Theory II. (3) Theoretical and compositional techniques of the music of 
the Baroque. Continuation of 171, with emphasis on common practice period 
harmony. Chorale style and fugue. P-Music 171 181. 

*173. Music Theory III. (3) Theoretical and compositional techniques of the music of 
the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Continuation of 172, with emphasis on 
the expanding harmonic system and form. P-Music 172 182. 

* 174. Music Theory IV. (3) Theoretical and compositional techniques of music in the 
twentieth century. Continuation of 173, with emphasis on twentieth century 
compositional practices and philosophies. Beginning of development of personal 
compositional style. P-Music 173/183. 

271. Counterpoint. (2) A survey of contrapuntal compositional techniques of the 
sixteenth, eighteenth, and twentieth centuries, including analysis of representative 
compositions and practical experience using contrapuntal techniques. Offered in 
alternate years. P-Music 174 184. 

272. Form and Analysis. (2) A study of analytical writings of theorists and composers 
and the development of practical skills as they can be used in research and performance 
preparation. Offered in alternate years. P-Music 174 184. 

273. Composition. ( 1 or 2) Individual instruction in the craft of musical composition. 
May be repeated for credit. P-Permission of the instructor. 

275. History of Theory. (2) A survey of theoretical writing on musical acoustics, 
instruments, and notation from Classical Greece to the present. Offered in alternate 
years. P-Music 174 184. 

276. Current Practices. (2) A survey of twentieth century compositional techniques, 
notation, and performance problems involving the study of music and theoretical 
writings associated with major trends from 1900 to the present. Offered in alternate 
years. P-Music 174 184. 

Music History 

103. Great Composers. (4) A study of composers considered outstanding either because 
of their works or because of their influence on the history of music. A different 
composer is offered each semester. P-Music 101 or permission of the instructor. 

a. Machaut i. Beethoven 

b. Dufay j. Schubert 

c. Ockeghem k. Wagner 

d. Josquin I. Stravinsky 

e. Montei'erdi m. Berg 

f. Bach n. Brahms 

g. Haydn p. Handel 
h. Mozart r. Bart ok 



*Music 171-174 must be taken .simultaneously with Music 181-184. 



103 



124. Chamber Music. (2) Study of the history and repertoire of chamber music from the 
late Baroque to the twentieth century. Classroom work combined with actual 
rehearsal and performance of chamber repertoire. May be repeated for credit. P-Audi- 
tion and permission of the instructor. 

*181. Music History I. (3) Survey of the history of music in the Middle Ages and 
Renaissance to 1600. Included are readings in the cultural history and related arts of 
the eras. 

*182. Music History II. (3) Survey ot the history of music in the Baroque to 1750. 
Included are readings in the cultural history and related arts of the era. P-Music 
171 181. 

*183. Music History III. (3) Survey ol the history of music in the Classical and Romantic 
eras to 1900. Included are readings in the c ultural history and related arts of the eras. 
P-Music 172 182. 

*184. Music History IV. (3) Survey of the history of music in the twentieth century. 
Included are readings in the cultural history and related arts of the era. P-Music 
173/183. 

211. Seminar in Church Music. (4) A survey of the great oratorios, cantatas, anthems, 
hymns, and organ compositions ol the chinch, with emphasis on their liturgical 
setting. P-Music 174 184. 

212. Music in the Church. Function of the church musician and the relationship of his 

or her work to the church program. P-Music 174 184. 

215. Philosophy of Music. (2) A survey of philosophical writings about music. 
Musical aesthetics; social, religious, and political concerns. P-Music 174 184. 

**219. Music in the Medieval World. (4) A study of Medieval music, its philosophy, 
theory (including notational practices), and performance practices. Areas receiving 
special emphasis are Cregorian chant repertoire, the Notre Dame School. Arts 
Antiqua, and Ars Nova. P-Music 171 181 or permission of the instructor. 

**220. Music in the Renaissance. (4) A study of music from 1400 to 1600. its theory 
(including notational practices), and performance practices. The study begins with 
the Burgundian School, with special areas of emphasis the Netherlands composers 
and the late Renaissance madrigal. P-Music 171181 or permission of the instructor. 

**221. Music of the Baroque. (4) Musical activity from about 1600 to Bach and Handel. 
Special emphasis on the development of national styles and their resolutions toward 
the end of the era. P-Music 172/182 or permission of the instructor. 

**222. Music of the Eighteenth Century. (4) Musical developments from the sons of 
Bach through the Viennese Classicism of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. P-Music 
173/183 or permission of the instructor. 

**223. Music of the Nineteenth Century. (4) Music from the latter part of Beethoven's 



*Music 181-18-f must be taken .simultaneously with Music 171-17-1. 
**Tu<o to jour courses from Music 21V-22-/ are offered every year. 



104 



career through Wagner and Brahms. Special emphasis on the post-Beethoven schism 
and its ramifications. P-Music 173 183 or permission of the instructor. 

**224. Music of the Twentieth Century. (4) A study of the major musical styles, 
techniques, and media of contemporary music from Debussy to the present. P-Music 
174 184 or permission of the instructor. 

Music Education 

185. Vocal Methods. (2) An examination of various methods, techniques, and music 
used in group singing. Offered in alternate years. 

186. String Instruments. (2) Fundamentals of playing and teaching all instruments of 
the string family. Offered in alternate years. 

187. Woodwind Instruments. (2) Fundamentals of playing and teaching all principle 
instruments of the woodwind family. Offered in alternate years. 

188. Brass and Percussion Instruments. (2) Fundamentals of playing and teaching 
brass and peicussion instruments. Offered in alternate years. 

280. Orchestration. (Education, 2) A study of tin- orchestral and wind band 
instruments, how composers have used them throughout history, and the 
development of practical scoring and manuscript skills. Offered in alternate years. P- 
Music 174 184. 

282. Conducting. (Education, 2) A study of choral and instrumental conducting 
techniques, including practical experience with ensembles. Offered in alternate years. 
P-Music 174 184. 

284. Music Literature Seminar. (Education, 3 or 4) A survey of repertoire, including an 
examination of teaching materials in the student's special area of interest. P-Music 
174 184 and permission of the instructor. 

291. Teaching of Music. (Education, 4) The teaching and supervision of choral and 
instrumental music in the public schools, all grades. Offered through Salem College. 
P-Music 174 184. 

Honors and Individual Study 

298. Individual Study. (2 or 4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available in 
the department. By pre-arrangement. 

299. Honors in Music. (4) Individual study for honors candidates who have fulfilled 
the specific requirements. 

Ensemble 

Departmental ensembles are open to all students. Credit is earned on the basis of one 
credit per semester of participation. 

111. Opera Workshop. Study, staging, and performance of standard and 
contemporary operatic works. P-Permission of the instructor. 



''Two to four courses from Musk 21 1 >-22 J I are offered every year. 



105 



113. Orchestra. Study and performance of orchestral works from the classical and 
contemporary repertoire. P-Audition. 

1 15. Choral Union. A large oratorio chorus which concentrates on the performance of 
major choral works. P-Audition. 

115a. Concert Choir. A select touring choir of forty-five voices which performs a 
variety of choral literature from all periods. P-Audition. 

117. Marching Deacons Band. Performs for most football games. Meets twice weekly. 
No audition required. Fall. 

118. Concert Band. Study and performance of music for wind band. Spring. P- 
Permission of the instructor. 

119. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. Study and performance of music for wind ensemble. 
Regular performances on and off campus, including an annual tour. P-Audition. 

121. Jazz Ensemble. Study and performance of written and improvised jazz for a 
twenty-member ensemble. P-Audition. 

123. Piano Ensemble. Study ol the elements of accompanying and ensemble playing 
through class discussion and studio experience. P-Permission of the instructor. 

Applied Music 

Applied music courses are open to all students with the permission of the instructor. 
Credit is earned on the basis of lesson duration and weekly preparation. One credit per 
semester implies a half-hour of instruction weekly and a minimum of one hour of 
daily prac tice. Two credits per semester implies an hour of instruction weekly and a 
minimum of two hours of daily practice. With the permission of the music faculty and 
with a proportional increase in practice, a student may earn three or four credits per 
semester. Students in applied music who do not have basic knowledge of notation and 
rhythm are advised to enroll in Music 101 either prior to or in conjunction with 
applied study. An applied music fee and practice fee are charged for all individual 
instruction. 

161; 261. Individual Instruction. ( 1 or 2) May be repeated for credit. Technical studies 
and repertoire of progressive difficulty selected to meet the needs and abilities of the 
student. 



a. 


violin 




/. 


oboe 


k. 


French horn 


p. piano 


b. 


viola 




g- 


clarinet 


1. 


trombone 


q. percussion 


c. 


cello 




h. 


bassoon 


m. 


baritone 


r. guitar 


d. 


string 


bass 


i. 


saxophone 


n. 


tuba 


i'. voice 


e. 


flute 




]■ 


trumpet 


o. 


organ 





165p. Class Piano. (1) Scales, chords, inversions, and appropriate repertoire, with 
emphasis on sight-reading, harmonization, and simple transposition. Designed for 
the beginning piano student. 

165v. Class Voice I. ( 1 ) Introduction to the fundamental principles of singing; 
concepts of breath control, tone, and resonance. 



106 



166v. Class Voice II. (1) Continuation of fundamental vocal techniques. P-Music 165v 
or permission of the instructor. 

167v. Introduction to Theatrical Singing: Class Voice ( 1 ) Basic techniques of singing, 
breath control, phonation, and resonance, with emphasis on theatrical projection. 
Study and performance of musical theatre repertoire. (One hour per week.) 

168v. Theatrical Singing II: Class Voice (1) Continuation of theatrical singing 
techniques with increased study and performance of musical theatre repertoire. P- 
Music 167v or permission of the instructor. (One hour per week.) 

190. Diction for Singers (2) Study of articulation in singing, with emphasis on 
modification of English pronunciation of Italian, Oerman, and French. Development 
of articulatory and aural skills with use of the international phonetic alphabet. 
Individual performance and coaching in class. (Two hours per week.) 

Philosophy 

Gregory D. Pritchard, Chairman 

Professors Robert M. Helm, Marcus B. Hester, Gregory D. Pritchard 

Associate Professor Charles M. Lewis 

Assistant Professor Ralph C. Kennedy 

A major in philosophy requires thirty-six credits. The courses must include 261 and 
either 161 or 271, two courses from the history sequence (201, 21 1, 222), and one course 
from each of the following: 230, 231, 241, or 242; 279, 285, or 287; and 294 or 295. 

The Spilman Philosophy Seminar, open to advanced students in philosophy, was 
established in 1934 through an endowment provided by Bernard W. Spilman. The 
income from the endowment is used for the seminar library, which now contains 
about 4,000 volumes. Additional support for the library and other departmental 
activities is provided by the A. C. Reitl Philosophy Fund, which was established in 
1960 by friends of the department. The furniture in the library and seminar room was 
donated in honor of Mr. Claude V. Roebuck and Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Hough by their 
families. 

Two distinguished alumni of the College have made possible the establishment of a 
lectureship and a seminar. The late Guy T. Carswell has endowed the Guy T. and 
Clara Carswell Philosophy Lectureship, and a gift from James Montgomery Hester 
the Hester Philosophy Seminar. In addition, a lectureship bearing his name has been 
instituted in honor of Claude V. Roebuck. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in philosophy. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Philosophy," a student must submit an acceptable prospectus for an honors thesis by 
November for graduation in the spring semester or by May for graduation in the fall 
semester, present a satisfactory paper based on the prospectus, and show an acceptable 
level of performance in a discussion of the paper with the honors adviser and at least 
one other member of the department. 

133. Space and Time in Fact and Fiction. (4) Are space and time fundamentally 
different? Are they properties of the physical world or of minds only? Are they finite or 
infinite in extension and duration? Other questions cover problems and paradoxes in 



107 



the concept of space and in the concept of time travel. 

137. Personal Identity. (4) An examination of our concept of a person. One typical 
question is what conditions are necessary and sufficient to insure that a given human 
body continues over a period of time to be the body of one rather than several persons. 
Usually offered in January. 

151. Basic Problems of Philosophy. (4) An examination of the basic concepts of several 
representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge. 
man, God, mind, and matter. 

161. Logic. (4) An elementary study of the laws of valid inference, recognition of 
fallacies, and logical analysis. 

171, 172. Meaning and Value in Western Thought. (4, 4) A critical survey of religious 
and philosophical ideas in the Western world from antiquity to modern times. Either 
Philosophy 171 or 172 satisfies the philosophy or religion requirement; both 171 and 
172 satisfy both the philosophy and religion requirements. Choices determined at 
registration. 

201. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. (4) A study of philosophical problems such as 
the nature of faith, reason, universals, and God in the thought of Plato, Aristotle, 
Augustine, Abelard, Anselm, Aquinas, and Ockham. 

211. Modern Philosophy. (4) A survey of major philosophers from Descartes to 
Nietzsche. P-Philosophy 151 or 171 or 172. 

222. Contemporary Philosophy. (4) A survey of major philosophers from Russell to 
Sartre. P-Philosophy 151 or 171 or 172. 

231. Aristotle. (4) A study of the major texts, with emphasis on metaphysics, ethics, and 
theory of knowledge. P-Philosophy 151 or 171 or 172. 

241. Kant. (4) A detailed study of selected works covering Kant's most important 
contributions to theory of knowledge, metaphysics, ethics, and religion. P- 
Philosophy 151 or 171 or 172. 

242. Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Sartre. (4) An examination of selected sources embody- 
ing the basic concepts of Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Sartre, especially as they relate to 
each other in terms of influence, development, and opposition. P-Philosophy 151 or 
171 or 172. 

261. Ethics. (4) A critical study of selected problems and representative works in ethical 
theory. P-Philosophy 151 or 171 or 172. 

271. Symbolic Logic. (4) Basic concepts and techniques of modern deductive logic, 
beginning with the logic truth functions and quantification theory. Attention given 
to advanced topics such as descriptions, classes, and number, and to issues in the 
philosophy of logic. 

275. Mind, Matter, and Mechanism. (4) An inquiry into the nature of the mental. 
Topics include theories of mind (dualism, materialism, logical behaviorism), 



108 



personal identity, our knowledge of the minds of others, and the possible existence of 
minds in computers and non-human animals. P-Philosophy 151 or 171 oi 172. 

279. Philosophy of Science. (4) A systematic exploration of the conceptual foun- 
dations of scientific thought and procedure. P-Philosophy 151 oi 171 or 172. 

282. Philosophy of Law. (4) A philosophical inquiry into the nature of law and its 
relation to morality. Classroom discussions of readings from the works of classical and 
modern authors focus on issues of contemporary concern involving questions of 
legal principle, personal liberty, human rights, responsibility, justice, and 
punishment. 

285. Philosophy of Art. (4) A c ritical examination of several philosophies oi art, with 
emphasis upon the application of these theories to particular works of art. P- 
Philosophy 151 or 171 or 172. 

287. Philosophy of Religion. (4) A systematic analysis of the logical structure of 
religious language and belief, including an examination of religious experience, 
mysticism, revelation, and arguments for the nature and existence of God. P- 
Philosophy 151 or 171 or 172. 

290. Readings in Philosophy. (4) A discussion of several important works in 
philosophy or closely related areas. P-Philosophy 151 or 171 or 172. 

292. Wittgenstein. (4) A senior seminar in which the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein on 
several central philosophical problems is studied and compared with that of Frege, 
James, and Russell. Topics include the picture-theory of meaning, truth, scepticism, 
private languages, thinking, feeling, the mystical, and the ethical. P-Philosophy 151 
or 171 or 172. 

294. Seminar in Epistemological Problems. (4) A senior course requiring a major 
research paper. P-Philosophy 151 or 171 or 172. 

295. Seminar in Metaphysical Problems. (4) A senior course requiring a major research 
paper. P-Philosophy 151 or 171 or 172. 

297, 298. Seminar: Advanced Problems in Philosophy. (4, 4) Senior courses treating 
selected topics in philosophy. P-Philosophy 151 or 171 or 172. 

Physical Education 

William L. Hottinger, Chairman 

Associate Professors William L. Hottinger, Paul M. Ribisl 

Assistant Professors Gary E. Adams, W. Thomas Boone, Dorothy Casey, Leo Ellison 

Visiting Assistant Professors John Hutslar, Sarah D. Hutslar 

Lecturer J. William Dellastatious 

Instructors Elizabeth Bonner, Deborah S. David, Gail L. Sailer, Barbara Warren 

The purpose of the Department of Physical Education is to organize, administer, 
and supervise (1) a required physical education program consisting of conditioning 
activities, varied team and individual sports, special corrective and remedial 



109 



instruction to all students with physical problems according to the individual's need, 
with information on posture and body mechanics, physiological principles, and 
practical health facts which must be observed to maintain a state of health and 
physical fitness; (2) an intramural sports program which allows all students to 
participate and specialize in sports which can be of life-long benefit; (3) a supervised 
recreation program consisting of varied recreational and leisure time activities; and (4) 
a professional education program which offers the necessary preparation for those 
interested in the fields of health, physical education, recreation, and athletic coaching. 

Physical Education Requirement 

All entering students are required to complete two semesters of physical education: 
Physical Education 111, Foundations of Health and Physical Fitness, and one 
additional course selected from the 100-series of physical education courses. The 
requirement must be met before enrollment in additional elective courses. It is 
recommended that the requirement be completed by the end of the student's first year; 
it must be completed by the end of the second year. 

Courses in Basic Instruction and Elective Physical Education 

111. Foundations of Health and Physical Fitness 

112. Sports Proficiency 

113. Adaptive Physical Education 

114. Weight Control 

115. Physical Conditioning 

116. Weight Training 

120. Beginning Dance Technique 

121. Intermediate Dance Technique (P-Physical Education 120 or permission of the 
instructor) 

122. Adi'anced Dance Technique (P-Physical Education 121 or permission of the 
instructor) 

123. Dance (Composition (P-Physical Education 121 ) 

124. Social Dance 

125. Folk Square Dance 

130. Beginning Tumbling Free Exercise 

131. Intermediate Tumbling/Free Exercise 

132. Beginning Gymnastic Apparatus 

133. Intermediate Gymnastic Apparatus 

134. Aero-Sports 

HO. Beginning Swimming 

HI. Intermediate! Advanced Swimming 

143. Water Ballet I Synchronized Swimming 

144. Springboard Diving 

H5. Advanced Lifesaving and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) (P-Strong 

swimming ability) 
146. Water Safety Instructor's Course ( P-Current advanced lifesaving certification) 
150. Beginning Tennis 



10 



151. Intermediate Tennis 

1 = >2. Advanced Tennis (P-Physical Education 1^1 or permission of the instructor) 

153. Beginning Intermediate Racquetball 

154. Beginning Intermediate Badminton 

155. Beginning Squash Racquets 

160. Beginning Golf 

161. Intermediate Golf 

162. Archery 

163. Bowling 

16-1. Beginning Intermediate Handball 
165. Recreational dames 
170. Volleyball 
111. Soccer 

175. Wrestling 

176. Fencing 

ISO. Horseback Riding 
181. Snow Skiing 

152. Beginning Ice Figure Skating 
190. Sports Option 

Courses for the Major 

Students desiring to elect a major in physical education and health and to satisfy 
the state requirements for a teaching certificate must be of junior standing. Biology 
1 1 1 and 150 are required, along with the following courses in physical education and 
health: 220. 221. 222. 224. 230. 240. 250, 252. 353. 357. 360. and 363. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in physical education. To be graduated with the designation 
"Honors in Physical Education," they must participate satisfactorily in Physical 
Education 382 and pass a comprehensive written examination. Upon satisfactory 
completion of these requirements they are recommended for graduation with 
"Honors in Physical Education." For additional information members of the 
departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Any student interested in majoring in physical education should consult the 
chairman of the department as soon as possible after entering the University. 

210. History and Sociology of Sports. (3) A study of the historical and sociological 
bases underlying sports, games, dance, and gymnastics and the impact these forces 
now have on society and culture. 

211. Foundations of Health and Physical Fitness. (2) A presentation of the 
physiological, psychological, and sociological foundations of personal health and 
physical fitness. 

220. Methods and Materials in Aquatics. (2) Presentation of knowledge, skill, and 
methods of teaching acquatics. 

221. Methods and Materials in Gymnastics and Dance. (4) Presentation of knowledge. 



skill, and methods of teaching gymnastics and dance. 

222. Methods and Materials in Teaching and Coaching Team Sports. (4) Presentation 
of knowledge, skill, and methods of teaching, coaching, and officiating team sports. 

224. Methods and Materials in Team and Individual Sports. (4) Theory and practice in 
organization and teaching selected individual and dual sports in a comprehensive 
physical education program. 

230. First Aid and Athletic Training. (2) A study of first aid techniques and the care and 
treatment of athletic injuries. 

240. Physical Education for Pre-School and Elementary School. (3) A study of the 
developmental stages of fundamental motor skills and a presentation of methods of 
teaching physical education activities to the pre-school and elementary school child. 

250. Principles, Organization, and Administration of Health, Physical Education, 
and Athletics. (4) A study of principles, organization, and administration of health, 
physical education, and athletics. 

252. Anatomy and Physiology. (5) A course to provide students of physical education 
with a functional knowledge of the anatomic structure and physiologic function of 
the human body. 

310. Applied Field Study. (2) A course involving application of theory and methods of 
solving problems in a specialized area according to the student's immediate career 
goals. P-Physical Education 251 or permission of the instructor. 

353. Physiology of Exercise. (4) The course presents the many effects of muscular 
activity on the processes of the body which constitute the scientific basis of physical 
education. 

357. Kinesiology and Adapted Physical Education. (5) A study of the principles of 
human motion based on anatomical, physiological, and mechanical principles and 
the application of these principles along with other special considerations in 
developing a program for the atypical student. 

360. Evaluation and Measurement in Health and Physical Education. (3) A course in 
measurement techniques and beginning statistical procedures to determine pupil 
status in established standards of health and physical education which reflect the 
prevailing educational philosophy. 

363. Personal and Community Health and Safety Education. (3) A course presenting 
personal, family, and community health problems; a study of safety in the schools. 

382. Independent Study in Health and Physical Education. (1-4) Library conferences 
and laboratory research performed on an individual basis. 



Physics 

George P. Williams Jr., Chairman 

Professors Robert W. Brehme, Vsbrand Haven, Howard W. Shields, 

Thomas J. Turner, George P. Williams Jr. 

Associate Professor William C. Kerr 

The program of courses for each student majoring in physics is developed through 
consultation with the student's major adviser and may lead to either a Bachelor of Arts 
or a Bachelor of Science degree. The B.A. degree requires a minimum of basic physics 
courses and allows a wide selection of electives related to the student's interests in other 
disciplines. The B.S. degree is designed to prepare students for careers in physics, 
perhaps beginning with graduate study. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in physics requires thirty-seven credits in physics and 
must include courses 141, 161, 162, 345, and two from 230, 352, and 351. The Bachelor 
of Science degree in physics requires forty-five credits in physics and must include 
courses 311, 312, 343, 344, 345, and 346. For either degree, two courses in chemistry or 
the equivalent and Mathematics 251 are required. 

A typical schedule for the first two years: 

Freshman Sophomore 

Basic and divisional requirements Basic and divisional requirements 
Physics 111, 112, 121, 122 (five courses) 

Mathematics 111, 112 Physics 141, 162 

Foreign Language Mathematics 251 

If a student does not take Physics 1 1 1-1 12 or 121-122 in the freshman year, one of the 
sequences may be taken in the sophomore year. The degree requirements in physics 
may still be completed by the end of the senior year. 

No student may be a candidate for a degree with a major in physics unless he or she 
earns a grade of C or better in general physics or is given special permission by the 
department. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in physics. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Physics," they must complete satisfactorily Physics 381 and pass a comprehensive 
written examination. For additional information members of the departmental 
faculty should be consulted. Members of the faculty may also be consulted regarding 
the engineering program. 

104. Introductory Physics for Teachers. (3) No lab. 

105. Descriptive Astronomy. (4) An introductory study of the universe, from the solar 
system to the galaxies. 

108. Energy and the Environment. (2) A descriptive, non-mathematical introduction 
to the concept of energy and its role in the environment. 

Ill, 112. Introductory Physics. (5, 5) A course for freshmen and sophomores. Lab- 
two hours. 



113 



121, 122. General Physics. (5, 5) A course designed for those who expect to major in 
physics or chemistry. A student may not receive credit for both this course and Physics 
111, 112. Lab-two hours. C-Mathematics 111. 

141. Elementary Modern Physics. (4) The development of twentieth century physics 
and an introduction to quantum ideas. P-Physics 112 or 121; C-Mathematics 112. 

161. Introductory Mechanics. (5) The fundamental principles of mechanics. Lab- 
three hours. Offered in the spring of even-numbered years. P-Physics 111 or 121 and 
Mathematics 111 or equivalent. 

162. Introductory Electricity. (5) lire fundamental principles of electricity, 
magnetism, and electromagnetic radiation. Lab-three hours. P-Physics 112; C- 
Mathematics 112. 

230. Electronics. (4) Introduction to the theory and application of transistors and 
electronic circuits. Lab-three hours. P-Physics 162 or equivalent. 

31 1. Mechanics. (4) A junior senior level treatment of analytic classical mechanics. P- 
Mathematics 251. 

312. Electromagnetic Theory. A junior senior level treatment of classical 
electromagnetic theory. P-Physics 162 and Mathematics 251. 

331, 332. Acoustics I, II. (4, 4) A study of the fundamental principles and applications 
of the generation, transmission, and reception of sound and its interaction with 
various media. 

343, 344. Modern Physics. (4, 4) Application of the elementary principles of quantum 
mechanics to atomic and molecular physics. 

345, 346. Modern Physics Laboratory. (1,1) The laboratory associated with Physics 
343, 344. Lab-three hours. 

351. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. (4, 4) Introduction to classical and 
statistical thermodynamics and distribution functions. 

352. Physical Optics and Spectra. (5) A study of physical optics and the quantum 
treatment of spectra. Lab-three hours. 

381. Research. (4) Library, conference, and laboratory work performed on an 
individual basis. 

Politics 

James A. Steintrager, Chairman 

Professors C. H. Richards Jr., James A. Steintrager 

Professor of History and Asian Studies Balkrishna Govind Gokhale 

Associate Professors David B. Broyles, Jack D. Fleer, Carl C. Moses, 

Jon M. Reinhardt, Donald O. Schoonmaker, Richard D. Sears 

In its broadest conception, the aim of the study of politics is to understand the way in 
which policy for a society is formulated and executed and to understand the moral 



14 



standards by which policy is or ought to be set. This center of interest is often described 
alternatively as the study of power, of government, of the state, or of human relations 
in their political context. For teaching purposes, the study of politics has been divided 
by the department into the following fields: (1) American politics, (2) comparative 
politics, (3) political philosophy, and (4) international politics. Introductory courses 
in the first three of these fields provide broad and flexible approaches to studying 
political life. 

The major in politics consists of thirty-six credits, of which no more than four 
credits may be earned in January courses. The courses must include the following: (a) 
a first course selected from Politics 113, 114, or 125; (b) any one introductory or 
advanced course in each of the four fields of the discipline, restricted to non-seminar 
courses; (c) one seminar in politics (usually a student takes no more than one seminar 
in each field and no more than three seminars overall). 

A minimum grade average of C on all courses attempted in politics is required for 
graduation. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in politics. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Politics," they must successfully complete Politics 284 and one seminar course. For 
additional information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

A student who selects politics to fulfill the Division IV requirement must take one of 
the following courses: Politics 113, 114, or 115. No introductory level course is 
required for students taking a politics course as an elective unless such a prerequisite is 
specified in the course description. 

Introductory Courses 

A student may take any one of the following as the first course in the department; 
more than one may be taken. Ordinarily a student is expected to take Politics 1 13 as 
the first course. 

113. Introduction to Politics: American Politics. (4) The nature of politics, political 
principles, and political institutions, with emphasis on their application to the 
I'nited States. 

114. Introduction to Politics: Comparative Politics. (4) Political processes and 
principles as applied to traditional, developing, and mature states. 

115. Introduction to Politics: Political Theory. (4) Major systematic statements of the 
rules and principles of political life. Representative writers are Tocqueville, Dahl, 
and Aristotle. 

American Politics 

210. American Public Policy Analysis. (4) Analysis of the substance of public problems 
and policy alternatives. Examination of why government pursues certain policies and 
the consequences of those policies. 

211. Political Parties and Voting Behavior. (4) An examination of party competition, 
party organizations, the electorate and electoral activities of parties, and the 
responsibilities of parties for governing. 



213. Public Administration. (4) Introduction to the study of public administration 
emphasizing policy-making in government agencies. 

218. Congress and Policy-Making. (4) An examination of the composition, authority 
structures, external influences, and procedures of Congress with emphasis on their 
implications for policy-making in the United States. 

220. The American Presidency. (4) Emphasis on the office and the role; contributions 
by contemporary presidents considered in perspective. 

221. North Carolina Politics. (4) A study of three major components of the state's 
political system: electoral competition, legislative politics, and executive politics 
(particularly the office of governor). Offered in January. 

222. Urban Problems and Politics. (4) Political structures and processes in American 
cities and suburbs as they relate to the social, economic, and political problems of the 
metropolis. 

225. American Constitutional Law: Separation of Powers and the Federal System. (4) 

An analysis of Supreme Court decisions affecting the three branches of the national 
government and federal/state relations. 

226. American Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties. (4) Judicial interpretations of First 
Amendment freedoms, racial equality, and the rights of the criminally accused. 

227. Politics, Law, and the Legal Process. (4) Analysis of the nature and possible 
sources of law, the proper role of law in social change, structure and process in the 
legal system, and the impact of legally decided policies on society, including their 
propensity for justice and fairness in American democratic society. 

228. Watergate. (3, 4) An investigation of the Watergate crisis in the context of the 
political scandals of American history. 

Comparative Politics 

231. Western European Politics. (4) Analysis of the political systems of Great Britain, 
France, and Italy, focusing primarily on the problems of stable democracy. 

232. Government and Politics in the Soviet Union. (4) Analysis of the institutions and 
processes of politics in the USSR and examination of political developments in the 
other states of Eastern Europe. 

233. Modern German Politics. (4) A study of the political systems of twentieth century 
Germany, with comparison of political behavior and governmental institutions of 
West Germany and East Germany. 

234. Government and Politics in East Asia. (4) An analysis of the political institutions 
and processes in China and Japan, with emphasis on the problem of modernization. 

235. The Politics of Revolution. (4) The comparative study of revolution as a his- 
torical phenomenon and as an alternative means of change in the contemporary 
world. Analysis of the nature, the background and causes, the processes, the varieties, 
and the consequences of revolution, and an attempt to assess the capabilities or 
potential of some current movements purporting to be revolutionary. Some 



If) 



revolutions receiving particular attention are those of England, France, Russia, 
Mexico, Cuba, and China, and some broad movements included are the New Left and 
contemporary anarchism in the United States and Western Europe. 

236. Government and Politics in Latin America. (4) Comparative analysis of the 
institutions and processes of politics in the Latin American region. 

238. History, Culture, and Political Change. (4) The study of how major cultures 
articulate or symbolize their existence either in history or moving through history. 
Special attention given to an evaluation of current concepts applied to political 
change. 

239. Comparative Bureaucratic Elites. (4) An investigation of the role of top civil 
servants in the decision-making process of industrialized political systems. The 
dilemma of bureaucratic power and democratic accountability explored in the 
political systems of the United States, West Germany, Great Britain, France, Italy, and 
one of the Scandinavian countries. 

240. Socialism in Cuba. (4) An intensive study of contemporary Cuba embracing 
consideration of several aspects: the origins and course of development of the Cuban 
variety of socialism; the political, economic, and social structures, methods, policies, 
and goals; the status and role of leaders and institutions; comparison with some other 
major Marxist regimes; and prospects for the future. Offered in January. 

241. Politics in Mexico. (4) A study of Mexican political life from historical and 
sociocultural perspectives, focusing particularly upon the subject of political culture 
and socialization. One week on campus, the remainder in Mexico. Offered in January. 

242. Problems in Comparative Politics. (4) An intensive study of one or more major 
problems in contemporary comparative politics. 

245. Government and Politics of South Asia. A study of the governments of India, 
Pakistan, Nepal, and Ceylon. Emphasis on political organizations, party structures, 
and subnational governmental systems. 

International Politics 

251. Fundamentals of Internationa] Politics. (4) Fundamental theoretical questions of 
international politics, with special emphasis on existing international patterns. 

252. Current Problems in International Politics. (4) An intensive study of one or more 
major problems of contemporary international politics. 

254. American Foreign Policy: Contemporary Problems. (4) A critical examination of 
different methods of studying American foreign policy and of selected policies 
followed by the United States since the early 1960s. 

255. American Foreign Policy: The Cold War Period. (4) A critical examination of the 
forces which shape American foreign policy and of selected policies followed from 
World War II to the Cuban Missile Crisis. 

256. The Cold War: Research in Washington, D. C. (4) The course focuses on Cold 
War research in Washington, D.C., using the resources of the National Archives and 
the Library of Congress. Offered in January. 



17 



Political Philosophy 

271. Plato, Aristotle, and Classical Political Philosophy. (4) An examination of the 
nature and goals of the classical position, with attention both to its origins in ancient 
Athens and its diffusion through Rome and the Medieval world. Representative 
writers are Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero. 

272. Equality and Liberty. (4) The arguments for and against democracy and 
republicanism, majority rule, and the rights of man. Representative writers are 
Rousseau and Mill. 

273. Radical Critiques of Political Society. (4) Anarchist, socialist, and communist 
criticisms of and alternatives to existing political societies, with special attention to 
such problems as utopianism and alienation. Representative writers are Marx and 
Nietzsche. 

275. Theory of the American Polity. (4) Critical examination of the intent of the 
Framers and the nature of the American polity. Representative writers are the 
Federalists, Jefferson, and Lincoln. Does not meet theory distribution requirement for 
majors. 

278. Foundations of Modern Political Philosophy. (4) An examination of the essential 
writings of thinkers who broke with the past in an attempt to establish a more 
"realistic" approach to the study of politics. Representative writers are Machiavelli, 
Hobbes, and Locke. 

279. Minor Classics in Political Thought. (4) The study of one or two authors of 
importance not ordinarily covered in courses in political thought or the study of 
minor writings of major authors. Examples: Xenephon, Averroes, Swift, and Locke's 
First Treatise. Offered in January. 

Honors and Individual Study 

284. Honors Study. (4) A conference course with a faculty committee. Readings in 
several fields provide the basis for an extensive paper on a subject of special interest to 
the student. This course is taken in the senior year by all candidates for departmental 
honors. 

287. Individual Study. (2, 3, or 4) Internships, work/study projects, and other 
individual study programs. (See department for details.) 

Seminars 

291. Seminar in American Politics. (4) Readings, research, and independent study on 
selected topics. P-Permission of the department. 

292. Seminar in Comparative Politics. (4) Readings, research, and independent study 
on selected topics. P-Permission of the department. 

293. Seminar in International Politics. (4) Readings, research, and independent study 
on selected topics. P-Permission of the department. 

294. Seminar in Political Philosophy. (4) Readings, research, and independent study 
on selected topics. P-Permission of the department. 



Psychology 

John E. Williams, Chairman 

Professors Robert C. Beck, Robert H. Dufort, John E. Williams 

Associate Professors David W. Catron, Philippe R. Falkenberg, 

David Allen Hills, Charles L. Richman, John J. Woodmansee 

Assistant Professors Cecilia H. Solano, Frank B. Wood 

Visiting Assistant Professors Kathrynn A. Adams, Jean C. Seeman 

Lecturer Brian M. Austin 

Instructor Liane D. Bidwell 

Adjunct Instructors Sam T. Manoogian, David A. Stump 

Psychology 151 is prerequisite to all courses of a higher number. Courses 
numbered below 151 do not count toward Division IV requirements or toward the 
major in psychology. Psychology 211, or special permission of the instructor, 
is prerequisite for all 300-level courses except 335, 344, 358, and 367. 

It is recommended that students who are considering psychology as a major 
take Psychology 151 in their freshman year and Psychology 211 in the fall of 
their sophomore year. An average of C in psychology courses is required at 
the time the major is elected. The major in psychology requires the completion 
of a minimum of forty credits in psychology, including 151, 211, 212, and 313. 
In addition, the major student must complete one course from each of the following 
groups: 320, 326, 329, and 333; 351. 355, and 362. No more than forty-eight 
psychology credits may be counted toward the graduation requirement. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to participate in 
the honors program in psychology. To be graduated with the designation 
"Honors in Psychology," the student must complete satisfactorily a special 
sequence of courses (381, 383) and pass an oral or written examination. In 
addition, the honors student normally has a non-credit research apprenticeship 
with a faculty member. For more detailed information members of the staff should be 
consulted. 

100. Learning to Learn. (4) A workshop to help people improve their learning 
skills through the application of basic principles of learning, 
remembering, and so forth. Students at all levels welcomed. No prerequisite. 

102. Exploration of Career Planning. (4) Examination of educational vocational 
planning as a personal process, based on knowledge of self and the work 
world. No prerequisite. 

151. Introductory Psychology. (4) A systematic survey of psychology as the 
scientific study of behavior. Prerequisite to all courses of a higher number. 

211, 212. Research Methods in Psychology. (5, 5) Introduction to the design and 
statistical analysis of psychological research. Lab-twice weekly. P- 
Psychology 151. 

239. Altered States of Consciousness. (4) Examination of altered states of 
consciousness with special reference to sleep and dreams, meditation, 
hypnosis, and drugs. P-Psychology 151. 



19 



241. Developmental Psychology. (3 or 4) Survey of physical, emotional, 
cognitive, and social development in humans from conception to death. P- 
Psychology 151. 

245. Survey of Abnormal Behavior. (3 or 4) Study of problem behaviors such as 
depression, alcoholism, antisocial personality, the schizophrenias, and 
pathogenic personality patterns, with emphasis on causes, prevention, and 
the relationships of these disorders to normal life styles. P-Psychology 151. 

250. Psychology in Eurpoe. (4) The study of psychology and travel in European 
countries. Content and travel plans vary from year to year depending upon 
interests of faculty and students. Usually offered in January. P-Psychology 151. 

255. Theories of Personality. (3 or 4) A comparative study of classical and 
contemporary theories of human personality. P-Psychology 151. 

260. Social Psychology. (3 or 4) A survey of the field, including theories of 
social behavior, interpersonal attraction, attitudes and attitude change, and 
group behavior. P-Psychology 151. 

264. The Therapeutic Process. (4) Theories and laboratory practice of a variety of 
psychotherapeutic methods, with a special emphasis on developing the 
student's facilitative skills as a therapeutic agent. P-Psychology 151. 

265. Human Sexuality: A Changing Scene. (4) An exploration of the 
psychological and physiological aspects of human sexuality, with attention 
to changing sexual mores, sexual deviances, sexual dysfunction, and sex-related roles. 
P-Psychology 151. 

268. Psychology of Business and Industry. (3 or 4) Psychological principles and 
methods applied to problems commonly encountered in business and industry. P- 
Psychology 151. 

270. Topics in Psychology. (1.2, or 3) The student selects from among a group of short 

one-credit courses dealing with topics of special interest. The courses meet 

sequentially, not concurrently, and several options are offered in each portion 

of the semester. P-Psychology 151. 

270A. Aggression 270G. Information Processing 

270B. Applications of Psychology 270H. Intelligence 

270C. Biofeedback 2701. Race and Young Children 

270D. Brain Behavior Relations 270] . Memory 

270E. Emotion 270K. Psychology and Politics 

270F. Human Sexuality 270L. Sex Stereotypes and Roles 

275. Issues in Psychology. (4) Seminar on contemporary theoretical and research 
issues in psychology. P-Psychology 151. 

280. Directed Study. (1-4) Student research performed under faculty supervision. P- 
Psychology 151 and permission of the instructor. 

281. Individual Study. (4) A special project conducted under faculty supervision. 
P-Psychology 151 and permission of the department. 



120 



313. History and Systems of Psychology. (4) The development of psychological 
thought and research from ancient Greece to present trends, with emphasis on 
intensive examination of original sources. P-Psychology 21! or 
permission of the instructor. 

320. Physiological Psychology. (4) Neurophysiological and neuroanatomical 
explanations of behavior. P-Psychology 211 or permission of the instructor. 

322. Behavior Genetics. (2) A study of the effects of genes and chromosomes on 
behavior and the importance of behavior in understanding evolution. P- 
Psychology 211. 

323. Animal Behavior. (4) A survey of laboratory and field research on animal 
behavior. This course may count as biology or psychology but not both. Choice to be 
determined at registration. P-Permission of the instructor. 

326. Learning Theory and Research. (4) Theoretical and experimental issues in 
the psychology of learning. P-Psychology 211. 

329. Perception. (4) Survey of theory and research findings on various sensory 
systems (vision, hearing, touch, taste). P-Psychology 211. 

333. Motivation of Behavior. (3 or 4) Survey of basic motivational concepts and 
related evidence. P-Psychology 211. 

335. Fundamentals of Human Motivation. (4) Description and analysis of some 
fundamental motivational phenomena, with special reference to human problems; 
includes reward and punishment, conflict, anxiety, affection, needs for 
achievement and power, aggression, creativity, and curiosity. P- 
Psychology 151. 

343. Developmental Disorders. (2) Delayed or distorted neural development 
studied in relation to major disturbances of learning and behavior in 
children and in the aging. P-Psychology 211. 

344. Abnormal Psychology. (4) Descriptive analysis of the major types of abnormal 
behavior with attention to organic, psychological, and cultural causes and 
major modes of therapy. Offered only in the summer. P-Psychology 151. 

347. Mental Retardation. (2) A brief overview of mental retardation covering 
current definitions, diagnostic procedures, primary known causal factors, 
and treatment procedures. Includes observational and/or practicum work in 
community centers. P-Psychology 211. 

351. Personality Research. (4) The application of a variety of research procedures 
to the study of human personality. Research projects required. P-Psychology 211. 

355. Research in Social Psychology. (4) Methodological issues and selected 
research in the study of the human as a social animal. Field research projects 
required. P-Psychology 211. 

358. Psychology of Woman. (4) Intensive study of the behavior of women and its 
personal application, including consideration of biological, social, and 
motivational factors. P-Psychology 151. 



121 



361. Operant Conditioning and Behavior Modification. (4) Principles, theory, and 
experimental research in operant learning, with applications to the 
modification of behavior in various populations and situations. P- 
Psychology 211. 

362. Psychological Tests and Measurements. (4) Theory and application of 
psychological assessment procedures in the areas of intelligence, aptitude, 
vocational interest, and personality. P-Psychology 211. 

363. Survey of Clinical Psychology. (3 or 4) An overview of the field of clinical 
psychology. P-Psychology 245 and senior standing, or permission of the 
instructor. 

367. Effectiveness in Parent/Child Relations. (4) A survey of popular approaches to 
child-rearing, with examination of the research literature on parent child 
interaction and actual training in parental skills. P-Psychology 151. 

369. Contemporary Applications of Psychology. (4) Supervised field experience 
in applied psychology. P-Psychology 151 and permission of the instructor. 

381. Honors Seminar. (3) Seminar on selected problems in psychology. Intended 
primarily for students in the departmental honors program. P-Psychology 211 and 
permission of the instructor. 

383. Honors Research. (3) Seminar in selected issues in research design, 
followed by independent empirical research under the supervision of a member of 
the departmental faculty. P-Psychology 212 and permission of the instructor. 

390. Advanced Theory and Method. (4) Seminar in a selected area of 
psychological theory and research. P-Psychology 211. 

392. Contemporary Problems in Psychology. (4) Seminar treatment of current theory 
and research in several "frontier" areas of psychology. Principally for senior 
majors planning to attend graduate school. P-Psychology 211 and senior 
standing. 

Religion 

Emmett Willard Hamrick, Chairman 

Professors John William Angell, George McLeod Bryan, Robert Allen Dyer, 

George J. Griffin, Emmett Willard Hamrick, Carlton T. Mitchell, 

Charles H. Talbert 

Associate Professors John E. Collins, Fred L. Horton Jr. 

Assistant Professor Ralph C. Wood Jr. 

Visiting Lecturers Thomas E. Dougherty Jr., D. Swan Haworth 

The department offers courses designed to give every student an 
opportunity to acquire at least an introduction to the life, literature, and most 
important movements in the field of religion. It also seeks to give the 
students preparing for specialized service as religious education 
directors, ministers, and missionaries the foundational courses needed for 
further studv. 



122 



A course in religion is required for all degrees. Any course offered by 
the department is accepted to meet the requirement except for 218, 225, 237, 239, 
240, 265, 266, 270, 273, 282, 286-287. 292, 346, and 362. 

A major in religion requires a minimum of thirty-two credits, at least half of 
which must be in courses above the 100-level. 

Pre-ministerial students are advised to include in their program of study, 
in addition to courses in religion, courses in philosophy, ancient 
history, public speaking, and two languages (Greek or Latin and German or 
French). 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for 
admission to the honors program in religion. To be graduated with the 
designation "Honors in Religion," they must apply to the chairman of the 
department for admission to the honors program, normally by February of the junior 
year. Upon completion of all the requirements the candidate is graduated with 
"Honors in Religion." For additional information members of the 
departmental faculty should be consulted. 

111. Introduction to the Old Testament. (4) Asm vey of the Old Testament designed to 
introduce the student to the history, literature, and religion of the ancient Hebrews. 

112. Introduction to the New Testament. (4) A survey of the literature of the New 
Testament in the context of early Christian history. 

113. The Hebrew Prophets. (4) A study of the background, personal characteristics, 
function, message, contribution, and present significance of the Hebrew prophets. 

114. The Wisdom Literature. (4) An introduction to the Wisdom Literature of the Old 
Testament, with special attention to Proverbs. 

120. Introduction to the Bible. (4) A consideration of prominent themes found in the 
Old and New Testaments. May be taken only by students who do not take Religion 1 1 1 
or 112. 

131. Basic Christian Ethics. (4) The Biblical and theological foundation of the 
Christian ethic and its expression in selected contemporary problems. 

161. World Religions. (4) The place of religion in life and the origin, nature, and 
accomplishments of the living religions of the world, studied from the historical point 
of view. 

162. Religion in Japan. (4) A survey of the religions of Japan, beginning with the 
prehistoric tradition and including the development and influence of Shinto, 
Buddhism, and Christianity, and the variation of these through recorded history to the 
present. Pass Fail optional. Offered in January. 

164. History of Christianity. (4) A rapid survey of the history of the Christian Church. 

166. American Religious Life. (4) A study of the history, organization, worship, and 
beliefs of American religious bodies, with particular attention to cultural factors. 

171, 172. Meaning and Value in Western Thought. (4, 4) A critical survey of religion 
and philosophy in the Western world from antiquity to modern times. This course 
may count as religion or philosophy but not both. Choice determined at registration. 



123 



173. An Introduction to Christian Theology. (4) A study of the ground structure and 
content of Christian belief. 

176. Theology and Modern Literature. (4) A study of modern literary artists whose 
themes are primarily theological, from Hopkins to Tolkien. 

200. Myth. (4) A study of the approaches to the interpretation of myth, with a focus on 
the meaning and values implicit in the myths of contemporary culture. 

201. Phenomenology of Religion. (4) A study of selected religious phenomena and of 
their meaning and function within human existence. 

214. Introduction to Biblical Archeology. (4) A survey of the contributions of Near 
Eastern archeology to Biblical studies. 

218. Seminar in the Mediterranean World. (4) Travel and study in such countries as 
Greece, Italy, Turkey, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, and Israel. 

224. Jesus and the Synoptic Gospels. (4) A study of Jesus' proclamation and activity in 
the light of modern critical research on the Gospels. 

225. The Gospel Genre. (4) Consideration of the Apocryphal Gospels and of non- 
Christian writings that assist in answering the question, what is a gospel? Pass/Fail 
optional. 

226. Early Christian Theologians: Paul. (4) An introduction to the Pauline 
interpretation of Christianity and its place in the life of the Early Church. 

227. Early Christian Theologians: The Fourth Evangelist. (4) An examination of the 
Johannine interpretation of Jesus and Christian faith. 

236. Church and Community. (4) An examination of the basic needs and trends of the 
contemporary community, especially the rural and suburban, in the light of the 
Christian norms for "the good community." 

237. Black Religion and Black Churches in America. (4) Survey of literature on these 
themes with an examination of the historical background and special attention to the 
contemporary area. 

238. Religion and Science. (4) An analysis of the relationship between science and 
religion in world culture. 

239. Ethical Value Systems in Confrontation, Conflict, and Creativity. (4) Exposure to 
Third World cultures by travel to Africa, Asia, or Latin America. Pass/Fail. 

240. Principles of Religious Education. (4) A study of the theory and practice of 
religious education, with emphasis on the basic foundations in religion and 
education. 

265. Religion in North Carolina. (4) A study of the major religious groups in North 
Carolina, with special emphasis upon their historical backgrounds. Visits to 
historical churches and other sites. Pass/Fail. 

266. Religious Sects and Cults. (4) An examination of certain religious sects in 
America, including such groups as Jehovah's Witnesses, communal groups, and 
Black Muslims. Pass Fail. 



124 



270. Walker Percy. (4) A theological examination of his novels and essays, his 
Southern stoic background, and his use of European existentialism. 

273. Studies in Ecumenical Theology. (4) A study of the ecumenical movement among 
Christians in the twentieth century, especially as related to the World Council of 
Churches and the Vatican. The course involves visits to Geneva and Rome. Pass Fail. 

276. The Problem of Evil from Job to Shakespeare. (4) A comparative analysis of the 
source and remedy of evil in Job, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Plato, Dante, and 
Shakespeare. 

277. Christian Literary Classics. (4) A study of Christian texts which are masterpieces 
of literature as well as faith, including works by Augustine, Dante, Pascal, Bunyan, 
Milton, and Newman. 

282. Honors in Religion. (4) A conference course including directed reading and the 
writing of a research report. 

286, 287. Directed Reading. (1-4, 1-4) A project in an area ot study not otherwise 
available in the department, permitted upon departmental approval of a petition 
presented by a qualified student. 

292. Teaching of Religion. (4) A study of the teaching of religion in church, school, 
and community. This course may be credited as education for those who are 
applicants for a state teacher's certificate in religious education. 

312. Poetic Literature of the Old Testament. (4) A study of Hebrew poetry, its types, its 
literary and rhetorical characterstics, and its significance in the faith of ancient Israel. 

315, 316. Field Research in Biblical Archeology. (4, 4) A study of the religion and 
culture of the ancient Near East through the excavation and interpretation of an 
ancient site. 

317. The Ancient Near East. (4) A comparative study of ancient Near Eastern cultures 
and religions, with special emphasis on Israel's relationships with surrounding 
peoples. 

321. The Quest for the Historical Jesus. (4) An investigation of the possibility and 
relevance of historical knowledge about Jesus through a consideration of the seminal 
"Lives of Jesus" since the eighteenth century. 

322. The General Epistles. (4) An exegetical study of two or more of the General 
Epistles, with emphasis on the setting of the epistles in the life of the Early Church. 

334. Christian Ethics and Contemporary Culture. (4) A study of the encounter between 
the Christian ethic and the value systems implicit in social areas such as economic s, 
politics, race, and sex. 

346. Theological Foundations of Religious Education. (4) A study of theological 
methodology, theories of learning, and philosophies of education in terms of their 
implications for religious education. 

350. Psychology of Religion. (4) An examination of the psychological elements in the 
origin, development, and expression of religious experience. 



354. Religious Development of (he Individual. (4) A study ol growth and development 
through childhood and adolescence to adulthood, with emphasis on the role of the 
home and the church in religious education. 

355. Theology of Pastoral Clare and Counseling. (4) A study of the relationship 
between theology and the purpose, theories, and methods ol pastoral tare. P- 
Permission of the instructor. 

360. Hinduism. (4) A studv ol the fundamental features ol the Hindu tradition. 

361. Buddhism. (4) A study of the Buddhist tradition, its fundamental features, and its 
impact on the cultures ol Asia. 

362. Judaism in the First Three Centuries of the Common Era. (4) A studv ol tin 
development ol Rabbinic Judaism out ol the sects and movements of first-century 
Judaism. Usually offered in January. 

363. Hellenistic Religions. (4) Consideration of available source materials, questions 

of method, and bibliography related to such Hellenistic religions as the mysteries, 
Hellenistic Judaism, and Gnosticism. 

365. History of Religions in Amenta. (4) A study ol Aineric an religions from c olonial 
times until (be present. 

373. History of Christian Thought. (4) A studv of the history of Christian thought, 
begining with its Hebraic and Creek backgrounds and tracing its rise and 
development to modern times. 

374. Contemporary Christian Thought. (4) An examination ol the major issues and 
personalities in modern theology. 

376. The Origins of Existentialism. (4) A study ol the principal nineteenth century 
figures who form the background loi twentieth century existentialism: Goethe, 
Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. 

Hebrew 

111, 112. Elementary Hebrew. (4, 4) A course for beginners in the classical Hebrew of 
the Bible, with emphasis on the basic principles of Hebrew grammar and the reading 
of Biblical texts. Both semesters must be completed. 

153. Intermediate Hebrew. (4) Intensive work in Hebrew grammar and syntax based 
upon the readings of selected texts. Readings emphasize post-Biblical Hebrew. P- 
Hebrew 111, 112, or the equivalent. 

211. Hebrew Literature. (4) The reading and discussion of significant Biblical Hebrew 
texts. P-Hebrew 153. 

212. Hebrew Literature II. (4) The reading and discussion of significant Biblical and 
post-Biblical texts. Offered on demand. P-Hebrew 153. 

301. Introduction to Semitic Linguistics. (4) In each of the lour weeks the history and 
structure of one of the languages from die Hamito-Semitic family of languages are 
studied. Usually offered in January. 



126 



Romance Languages 

Anne S. Tillett, Chairman 

Professors Shasta M. Bryant, Harry L. King Jr., John E. Parker Jr., 

Mary Frances M. Robinson, Richard L. Shoemaker, Anne S. Tillett 

Associate Professor Kathleen Glenn 

Visiting Associate Professor Doranne Fenoaltea 

Assistant Professors Gary R. Ljungquist, Gregorio C. Martin, Blanche C. Speer 

Lecturers Bianca Artom, Eva Rodtvvitt 
Instructors Frances Creighton, Judith Knoop, Mary H. Thomas, Sylvia Trelles, 

Frank H. Whitchurch 

The major in French requires a minimum of thiry-six credits, at least twenty-four of 
which must be in literature. French 221 and 222 or their equivalents are required. 
French travel study courses 181, 185, 187, and French 220 are not to be used for credit 
toward the major. History courses 321 and 322 are recommended for majors. An 
average of at least C must be earned on all courses taken in the major. 

The major in Spanish requires a minimum of thirty-six credits. Spanish 221 and 222 
or their equivalents are required. Spanish 223, 224, and eight credits chosen from 225, 
226, and 227 are recommended. Spanish 173, 181, 182, and 187 may not be counted 
toward the major. An average of at least C must be earned on all courses taken in the 
major. 

A joint major in Romance languages is offered in French and Spanish, consisting of 
fifty-six credits in the two languages and literatures, excluding elementary language. 
Required courses for this major are French 153x, 216, 217, 221, 222, and 224; Spanish 
153x, either 215 or 216, 221, 222, either 223 or 224; and eight credits from 225-227. 
Equivalents may be substituted. An average of at least C must be earned on all courses 
in French and Spanish. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in French or Spanish. To be graduated with the designation 
"Honors in Romance Languages." a candidate must complete French or Spanish 280 
or 281 and pass a comprehensive written and oral examination. The oral examination 
may be conducted, at least in part, in the major language. For additional information 
members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

101. Self-Instructional Language. (4) A self-instructional language course covering 
the principles of grammar and pronunciation in one of the less commonly taught 
languages, such as Japanese, Swedish, Arabic, or Thai. Individual self-instruction in 
the language of the student's choice through the use of recorded material and 
textbooks. Admission by petition to the Foreign Language Placement Review 
Committee. Elective credit only; does not satisfy basic or divisional course 
requirements. 

French 

111, 112. Elementary French. (4, 4) A course for beginners, covering the principles of 
French grammar and emphasizing speaking, writing, and the reading of elementary 
texts. Lab required. 



127 



113. Intensive Elementary French. (5) A one-semester course covering the elements 
of grammar and skills presented in French 111-112. Intended for students whose 
preparation for French 153 is inadequate. Not open to students who have received 
credit for French 112. Lab required. 

153. Intermediate French. (5) A review of grammar and composition with practice in 
conversation. Reading of selected texts. Lab required. P-French 111-112, or two years 
of high school French. 

153x. Intermediate French. (4) Open to students by placement or permission. Lab 
required. 

164. The Imaginary Invalid: A Classic in Comedy. (4) Participants plan and present a 
production of The Imaginary Invalid by the seventeenth century master of comedy 
Moliere. The play is read, discussed, and performed in English; students are involved 
in all aspects of production. Offered in January. 

181. Swiss French Civilization. (4) The course is designed to acquaint the student with 
the Swiss people and their civilization through living for a few weeks with families. 
Visits are made to points of cultural interest, historical, literary, and artistic . A journal 
and a paper describing in detail some aspects of Swiss French civilization, both in 
French, are required. Offered in January. 

185. Paris, Cultural Center of France. (4) A study of Paris monuments on location to 
explore the development of the city as capital and cultural cento ol Fiance. No 
prerequisites. Does not count toward major. Usually offered in the .summer. 

187. France in January. (4) The course is designed to acquaint the students with the 
French people and their civilization through living for a few weeks with families. 
Visits are made to points of cultural interest. Offered in January. P-French 153 or 
permission of the instructor. 

199. French Individual Study. (2-4) P-Permission of the department. 

214. Masterpieces of French Literature. (4) Selected readings in French literature 
designed to satisfy either basic or divisional foreign literature requirements. Offered in 
summer. P-French 153 or equivalent. 

215. Masterpieces of French Literature. (4) Reading of selected texts in French from the 
seventeenth to the twentieth centuries. Parallel reading and reports. P-French 153 or 
equivalent. 

216. Survey of French Literature from the Middle Ages through the Eighteenth 
Century. (4) Study of selected texts, parallel reading, and study of trends and 
movements. Taught largely in French. P-French 153 or permission of the instructor. 

217. Survey of French Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. (4) Study 
of selected texts, parallel reading, and study of trends and movements. Taught largely 
in French. P-French 153 or permission of the instructor. 

220. The French Literary Tradition. (4) A course designed for the non-major who 
wishes to gain a general background in French literature and literary history. Reading 
in French; lecture and discussion in English. Satisfies divisional requirement; does 
not count toward major. P-French 215. 



128 

221. Conversation and Composition. (1) Practice in speaking and writing French, 
stressing correctness of sentence structure, phonetics, pronunciation, fluency, and 
vocabulary for everyday situations. Required foi major. Lab required. P-French 153 
oi equivalent. 

222. Composition and Review of Grammar. (4) A systematic review of the 
fundamental principles of comparative grammar, with practical training in writing 
idiomatic French. Required for major. P-French 153 or equivalent. 

224. French Civilization. (4) An introduction to French culture and its historical 
development. Emphasis on intellec tual, artistic, political, social, and economic life oi 
Prance. Taught in French. P-French 221 or permission of the instructor. 

227. History of French Civilization. (2) An introduc tion to the historic al development 
of French culture, including consideration ol its intellectual, aitistic. and political 
heritage. Taught in French. P-French 221 oi permission of the- instructor. 

228. Contemporary France. (2) A stuck ol present-day France, including aspects of 
geography and consideration of social, politic al, and educational factors in Frenc h life 
today. Taught in French. P-French 221 oi pel mission of the instructor. 

231. Medieval French Literature. (2-4) A survey of French literature of the Middle Ages 
with cultural and political backgrounds. Selected masterpieces in original form and 
modern transcription. P-French 216 or 217 oi permission of the instructor. 

233. Sixteenth Century French Literature. (4) The literature and thought of the 
Renaissance in France, with particular emphasis on the works of Rabelais, 
Montaigne, and the major poets of the age. P-French 216 or 217 or permission of the 
instructor. 

241. Seventeenth Century French Literature. (1 ) A study of the outstanding writers ol 
the Classical Age. P-French 216 or 217 oi permission of the instructor. 

242. Seminar in Seventeenth Century French Literature. (4) Study of selec ted topics of 
the period. Topics may vary from year to year. P-French 21 6 or 217 or permission of the 
instructor. 

251. Eighteenth Century French Literature. (2-4) A survey of French literature of the 
eighteenth century with cultural and political backgrounds. P-French 216 or 
permission of the instructor. 

252. Seminar in Eighteenth Century French Literature. (2-4) Study of selec ted topics of 
the period. Topics vary from year to year. P-French 216 or 217 oi permission of the 

instructor. 

261. Nineteenth Century French Literature. (4) A study of French literature of the 
nineteenth century with c ultural and politic a 1 backgrounds. P-French 216 or 217 or 
permission of the instructor. 

262. Seminar in Nineteenth Centurv French Literature. (4) Study of selected topics of 
the period. Topics vary from year to year. P-French 216 or 217 or pel mission of the 
instructor. 

263. Trends in French Poetry. (4) A stuck of the development of the poetic genre with 



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analysis and interpretation ol works from each period. P-French 216 or 217 or 
permission of the instructor. 

264. French Novel. (4) A broad survey of French prose lie lion, with critical study of 
several masterpieces in the field. P-French 216 or 217 or permission of the instructor. 

256. French Drama. (4) A study ol thee hief (lends in Frenc h dramatic art, with reading 
and discussion of representative plays. P-French 216 or 217 or permission of the 
instructor. 

271. Twentieth Century French Literature. (4) A study of general trends and 
representative' works ol the foremost prose writers, dramatists, and poets. P-French 216 
or 217 or permission ol the instructor. 

272. Seminar in Twentieth Century French Literature. (1) Study of selected topics of 
the period. Topics vary from yeai to year. P-French 216 or 217 or permission of the 
instruc toi . 

280. Directed Research. (2) Required lor honors in French. 

281. Directed Study. (3-4) Extensive reading and or researc h to meet individual needs. 
Required lor departmental honors. P-Permission ol the department. 

371. Surrealism. (4) Origins, theories, evolution, and impact. This course examines 
the interconnections between Surrealist poetry and painting and the works of Breton, 
Eluard, and Aragon. Conducted in French. P-French 221 or equivalent. 

372. Proust. (4) Study of substantial portions of Proust's A la Recherche du Temps 
perdu, its themes, and their significance both in historical and aesthetic context. 
Conducted in French. P-French 221 or equivalent. 

373. French Images of America. (4) A study of French points of view through the 
reading of texts beginning with Tocqueville and ending with Michel Butor's Mobile. 
The course attempts to relate them to a variety of circumstances and influences, 
political, sociological, and cultural. Conducted in French. P-French 221 or equiva- 
lent. 

Semester in France 

The department sponsors a semester in Franc eat Dijon, the site of a well established 
French university. Students go as a group, accompanied by a professor from the 
College. 

No particular major is required for eligibility. However, a student ( 1 ) should be of 
junior standing and (2) should have taken as prerequisite French 221 or its equivalent 
or at very least one French course beyond the intermediate level. 

Students are placed in courses according to their level of ability in French, as 
ascertained by a test given at Dijon. Courses are taught by native French professors. 
The resident director supervises academic, residential, and extracurricular affairs and 
has general oversight of independent study projects. 

2232. Advanced Oral and Written French. (2-4) Study of grammar, composition, 
pronunciation, and phonetics, with extensive practice in oral and written French. 

2292. French Civilization. (2-4) An introduction to French culture and its historical 



130 



development. Field trips to museums and to points of historical and cultural 
significance in Paris and in the French provinces. 

2402. Independent Study. (2-4) One of several fields; scholar's journal and research 
paper. Supervision by the director of the semester in France and evaluation by the 
department for which credit is granted. Work may be supplemented by lectures on the 
subject given at the Universite'de Dijon Faculte des Lettres et Sciences Humaines. 

2752. French Literature. (2-4) The novel, theatre, and poetry of France, largely of the 
period since 1850. 

2762. Literary Pilgrimage. (2-4) Reading of selected French texts, with visits to sites 
having literary associations. A study of the relationship between milieux and works. 
Taught in French-speaking countries. 

Chinese 

111, 112. Elementary Chinese. (4, 4) Emphasis on the development of listening and 
speaking skills in Mandarin. Brief introduction to the writing system. Basic sentence 
patterns covered. Lab required. 

199. Individual Study. (2-4) P-Permission of the department. 

Hindi 

111, 112. Elementary Hindi. (4, 4) Attention given mainly to basic Hindi grammar, 
vocabulary-building, simple composition, and conversation. Lab required. 

153. Intermediate Hindi. (4) Advanced practice in Hindi composition and 
conversation and introduction to literary Hindi. Lab required. P-Hindi 111, 112, or 
the equivalent. 

211. Hindi Literature. (4) Reading and translation of selected texts in prose and poetry 
and journalistic Hindi. Lab required. P-Hindi 153. 

Italian 

113. Elementary Italian. (5) Intensive course for beginners, emphasizing the structure 
of the language and oral practice. Recommended for students in the Venice program 
and for language majors. Lab required. Lecture-five hours. Offered every semester. 

153. Intermediate Italian. (5) Continuation of 113, with emphasis on reading and 
speaking. Lab required. Lecture-five hours. P-Italian 1 13 or two years of high school 
Italian. 

153x. Intermediate Italian. (4) Open by placement or permission. Lab required. 

199. Individual Study. (2-4) P-Permission of the instructor. 

215. Introduction to Italian Literature I. (4) Reading of selected texts in Italian. 
Satisfies basic requirement in foreign language. Offered in spring. P- Italian 153 or 
equivalent. 

216. Introduction to Italian Literature II. (4) May alternate with 215. Satisfies basic 
requirement in foreign language. P-Italian 153 or equivalent. 



131 



Semester in Venice 

V221. Spoken Italian. (4) Course in oral Italian, offered only in Venice. Students are 
placed in small groups according to their levels of fluency. Elective credit. 

Norwegian 

190, 191. Norwegian. (4, 4) Independent study of the language and directed reading of 
texts in Norwegian. Primarily for students specializing in foreign languages. 

Russian 

111, 112. Elementary Russian. (4,4) The essentials of Russian grammar, 
conversational drill, and reading of elementary texts. Lab required. P-Permission of 
the instructor. 

153. Intermediate Russian. (5) Training in principles of translation with grammar 
review and conversation practice. Lab required. P-Russian 112 or equivalent. 

153x. Intermediate Russian. (4) Open by placement or permission. Lab required. 

165. Solzhenitsyn: The Politics of Literature. (4) Reading and discussion of all the 
works of Solzhenitsyn available in English. One long paper. Offered in January. 

215. Introduction to Russian Literature. (4) Reading of edited texts from the 
nineteenth century. P-Russian 153 or equivalent. 

216. Introduction to Russian Literature. (4) Reading of edited texts from the twentieth 
century. P-Russian 153 or equivalent. 

217. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Russian Literature. (4) A study of the foremost 
writers, with reading of representative works. P-Russian 153 or equivalent. 

218. Seminar in Contemporary Russian Literature. (4) Reading of representative 
works in Russian with discussion of political and cultural backgrounds. P-Russian 
153 or equivalent. 

Spanish 

111, 112. Elementary Spanish. (4, 4) A course for beginners covering grammar 
essentials and emphasizing speaking, writing, and the reading of elementary texts. 
Lab required. 

113. Intensive Elementary Spanish. (5) A one-semester course covering the elements of 
grammar and skills presented in Spanish 111-112.. Intended for students whose 
preparation for Spanish 153 is inadequate and for students who have demonstrated 
proficiency in another language. Not open to students who have received credit for 
Spanish 112. Lab required. 

153. Intermediate Spanish. (5) A review of grammar and composition with practice in 
conversation. Reading of selected texts. P-Two years of high school Spanish or 
equivalent. Lab required. 

153x. Intermediate Spanish. (4) Open by placement or permission. Lab required. 

161. The Spanish Romancero. (4) Study of the importance of the romancero in the 



132 



literature and life of Spain, focusing on the older ballads of the Middle Ages and 
Renaissance. Offered in January. 

162. A Panorama of Drama. (4) A brief sampling of Spanish drama from its early 
period to the contemporary theatre, studying in Spanish representative works from 
each major period. Approximately six plays. The class selects one play to present in 
Spanish, with students having directing and acting responsibilities. Offered in 
January. 

171. Contemporary Spanish American Novel. (4) A detailed study of a novel in 
Spanish by each of five or six outstanding contemporary Spanish American novelists, 
such as Juli Cortazar, Carlos Fuentes, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Usually offered 
in January. 

173. The Mexican Novel in Translation from 1915 to the Present. (4) A study of the 
Mexican Revolution of 1910-1918 as seen through the eyes of authors contemporary 
with the events they describe and of those who wrote in its aftermath: Azuela, Guzman, 
and Yanez; Rulfo and Fuentes. Pass Fail. Usually offered in January. 

181. Colombia: Study Tour of Bucaramanga, Cali, and Medellin. (4) Travel in 
Colombia and residence in one of its major cities in homes of private families for a 
period of three weeks. Students receive instruction in spoken Spanish and in 
Colombian literature and anthropology and political, social, or economic history. 
Offered in January. 

182. Introduction to Spain. (2-4) Familiarization with the Spanish people, Spanish 
culture, and daily life in Spain during the one-month orientation period preceding 
the beginning of formal classes in the semester in Spain program. Classes in 
conversational and idiomatic Spanish, excursions to points of historical and artistic 
interest, and lectures on selected topics. 

187. Spanish Culture and Language. (4) A study of Spanish culture and language, 
tailored to various levels of student ability. Taught only in the Spanish world. Does 
not count toward the major. 

199. Individual Study. (2-4) P-Permission of the department. 

214. Introduction to Hispanic Literature. (4) Selected readings in Spanish and 
Spanish American literature. Designed as a substitute for either Spanish 215 or 216. 
Offered in the summer. P-Spanish 153 or equivalent. 

215. Major Spanish Writers. (4) Reading of selected texts. P-Spanish 153 or equiva- 
lent. 

216. Major Spanish American Writers. (4) Reading of selected texts. P-Spanish 153 or 
equivalent. 

221. Conversation and Composition. (4) Practice in speaking and writing Spanish, 
stressing correctness of sentence structure, phonetics, pronunciation, fluency, and 
vocabulary of everyday situations. Lab required. P-Spanish 153 or equivalent. 

222. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (4) A systematic review of the 
fundamental principles of comparative grammar, with practical training in writing 
idiomatic Spanish. Lab required. P-Spanish 153 or equivalent. 



133 



223. Latin American Civilization. (4) The culture and i t >> historical development; 
emphasis on intellectual, artistic, political, social, and economic life. P-Spanish 215 
or 216. 

224. Spanish Civilization. (4) The c ulture and its historical development; emphasis 
on intellectual, artistic, political, social, and economic life. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 

225. Survey of Spanish Literature from the Middle Ages through the Seventeenth 
Century. (4) Extensive reading and study of trends and influences. P-Spanish 215 or 
216. 

226. Survey of Spanish Literature from the Eighteenth Century to the Present. (4) 

Extensive reading and study of trends and movements. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 

227. Survey of Spanish American Literature. (4) Extensive reading and study of works 
from the colonial through the contemporary periods, with emphasis on the late 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. P-Spanish 215 oi 216. 

234. Spanish Prose Fiction Before Cervantes. (4) A study of the several types of prose 
fiction, such as the sentimental, chivahic , pastoral, Moorish, and picaresque novels, 
prior to 1605. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 

241. Golden Age Drama. (4) A study of the major dramatic works of Lope de Vega, 
Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de Alarcon, and others. P-Spanish 215 or 
216. 

243. Cervantes. (4) Intensive study of the life and works of Cervantes, with special 
emphasis on the Quixote and the novelas ejemplare.s. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 

244. Seminar in Cervantes. (2) A study of special aspects of Cervantes' works, sue h as 
the novelas ejemplares and his dramatic works. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 

252. Seminar in Hispanic Poetry. (2) A study of selected topics, such as gongorismo, 
the romancero, and the Generation of 1927. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 

261. Nineteenth Century Spanish Novel. (4) A study of the novels of Valera, Pereda, 
Galdos, Pardo Bazan, Blasco Ihanez, and their contemporaries. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 

265. Spanish American Novel. (4) A study of the novel in Spanish American from its 
beginning through the contemporary period. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 

266. Seminar in Spanish American Novel. (4) A study of one or more categories of 
Spanish American novels, such as romantic, indianista, realistic, gaucliesca, and 
social protest. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 

269. Nineteenth Century Spanish Drama. (4) A study of the principal dramatic works 
of Neoclassicism to the end of the century. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 

271. Modern Spanish Drama. (4) A study of the principal dramatic works from the 
end of the nineteenth century through the contemporary period. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 

273. Modern Spanish Novel. (4) A study of representative Spanish novels from the 
Generation of 1898 through the contemporary period. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 

274. Seminar in Modern Spanish Literature. (2) An analysis of selected works 
representative of such movements as costumbrismo, Realism, Naturalism, and the 
contemporary social novel. P-Spanish 215 or 216. 



134 



280. Directed Research. (2) Required for honors in Spanish. 

281. Directed Study. (3-4) Extensive reading and or research, to meet individual needs. 
Required for departmental honors. P-Permission of the department. 

Semester in Spain 

The department offers a semester in Spain at Salamanca, the site of a well estab- 
lished Spanish university. Students go as a group, accompanied by a professor from 
the College. 

No particular major is required for eligibility. However, a student (1) should be of 
junior standing, (2) have completed intermediate Spanish or its equivalent, and (3) be 
approved by both the major department and the Department of Romance Languages. 
A course in Spanish conversation is also recommended. 



Social Sciences 

381, 382. Interdisciplinary Study and Research in Developing Areas. (4, 4) This course, 
designed to introduce students to problems facing developing areas, includes directed 
studies, intensive field research, and ciata analysis. 



Sociology 

John R. Earle, Chairman 

Professors John R. Earle, Clarence H. Patrick 

Associate Professors William H. Gulley, Philip J. Perricone 

Assistant Professor Don. M. Maultsby 

Visiting Assistant Professor Han T. Doan 

A major in sociology requires thirty-six credits and must include Sociology 151, 371, 
and 372. 

To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Sociology," highly qualified 
majors are invited to apply to the department for admission to the honors program. 
They must complete a senior research project, document their research, and 
satisfactorily defend their work in an oral examination. For additional information 
members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

151. Principles of Sociology. (3 or 4) General introduction to the field; social 
organization and disorganization, socialization, culture, social change, and other 
aspects. 

152. Social Problems. (3 or 4) Survey of contemporary American social problems. 
Credit is not allowed for 344 if this course is taken. P-Sociology 151. 

205. Photography in the Social Sciences. (3 or 4) Explores the use of photography as a 
research technique for the social sciences; camera and darkroom instruction 
included. Usually offered in January. P-Permission of the instructor. 



135 



248. Marriage and the Family. (3 or 4) The social basis of the family, emphasizing the 
problems growing out of modern conditions and social change. 

301. Religion as a Social Institution. (3) A cross-cultural study of religious 
organizations, cults, and sects. Examination of the forms of organization and their 
relationship to other social factors. Usually offered in January. P-Sociology 151. 

302. The Sociology of Cults. (3) A social scientific assessment of cults as new and 
deviant religious movements within modern industrial society. Examination of the 
history, doctrine, organization, and appeal of movements. Usually offered in January. 

303. The Police and Society. (4) A study of the position and role of the police in modern 
society. Examination of the nature of social control in human societies, the role of the 
police in social control, the police in France, England, and the United States, and the 
extent and causes and treatment of crime in America. Usually offered in January. P- 
Permission of the instructor. 

310. Death and Dying. (3) Study of some of the basic issues and problems of modern 
man in accepting and facing death. Offered in January. P-Permission of the 
instructor. 

333. The Urban Community. (3 or 4) A survey of materials relating to the community 
as a unit of sociological investigation, with emphasis on the urban setting. Of 
particular value for social work or community planning. P-Sociology 151. 

335. Medical Sociology. (3 or 4) Analysis of the social variables associated with health 
and illness and with the practice of medicine. P-Sociology 151. 

337. Aging in Modern Society. (3 or 4) Basic social problems and processes of aging. 
Social and psychological issues discussed. P-Sociology 151. 

340. Sociology of Child Development. (3 or 4) Socialization through adolescence in the 
light of contemporary behavioral science, emphasizing the significance of social 
structure. P-Sociology 151. 

341. Criminology. (3 or 4) Crime, its nature, causes, consequences, methods of 
treatment, and prevention. P-Sociology 151. 

342. Juvenile Delinquency. (3 or 4) The nature and extent of juvenile delinquency; an 
examination of prevention, control, and treatment programs. P-Sociology 151 and 
permission of the instructor. 

344. Social Deviation and Disorganization. (3 or 4) A theoretical approach to social 
problems; emphasis is on the relationship between social structure and social 
problems. Credit is not allowed for 152 if this course is taken. P-Sociology 151. 

345. Seminar on Social Change. (3 or 4) An analysis of the nature and theories of social 
change, including the causes and types of social change, the social effects of invention, 
the adjustment of social institutions to technological change, and the impact of future 
technology on society. P-Sociology 151. 

346. Seminar on Social Utopias. (3 or 4) Survey of major Utopian literature; emphasis 
is placed upon both the social organization in Utopian proposals and their implicit 
critique of current society and social ideologies. P-Sociology 151. 



136 



358. Population and Society. (3 or 4) Techniques used in the study of population data. 
Reciprocal relationship of social and demographic variables. P-Sociology 151. 

359. Race and Culture. (3 or 4) Racial and ethnic group prejudice and discrimination 
and its effect on social relationships. Emphasis on psychological and sociological 
theories of prejudice. P-Sociology 151. 

360. Social Stratification. (3 or 4) Methods for locating and studying social classes in 
the American class structure, function, mobility, and interclass relationships. P- 
Sociology 151. 

365. Dependency Needs and Social Services. (3 or 4) Examination of various forms of 
dependency, such as social, economic, emotional, and physical, and community social 
agencies designed to meet these needs. Use of relevant literature, field experience, and 
resource persons. 

371-372. The Sociological Perspective. (4) A two-semester course dealing with the 
development and application of major theories and research methods in sociology. A 
continuing efforts is made to enable the student to deal with current theoretically 
oriented research. P-Sociology 151 and permission of the instructor. 

380. Social Statistics. (3 or 4) Basic statistics, emphasizing application in survey 
research. A student who receives credit for this course may not also receive credit for 
Business 201 (formerly Business 268) or Mathematics 157 or Anthropology 380. 

385, 386. Special Problems Seminar. (3 or 4) Intensive investigation of current 
scientific research within the discipline which concentrates on problems of 
contemporary interest. P-Permission of the instructor. 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 

Donald H. Wolfe, Chairman 

Professors Julian C. Burroughs Jr., Franklin R. Shirley, David H. Welker 

Associate Professors Harold C. Tedford, Donald H. Wolfe 

Assistant Professor Michael D. Hazen 

Instructors Caroline S. Fullerton, Allen D. Louden, Jo Whitten May, Laura V. Rouzan 

For convenience in advising majors, the department has divided the study of speech 
communication and theatre arts into the following fields: ( 1 ) communication theory, 
(2) rhetoric/public address, (3) radio television film, (4) theatre arts, and (5) speech 
pathology/correction. It is possible for a student either to concentrate in one of the 
first four fields or to take courses across the breadth of the discipline. Specific courses 
of study are worked out in consultation with departmental advisers. 

A major in speech communication and theatre arts consists of a minimum of forty 
credits, at least eight of which must be at the 300-level. In order for a course to count 
toward a student's major, the student must earn a grade of C or higher in the course. 

Those students majoring in speech education and theatre arts education are 
expected to take specific courses which meet the requirements for teacher certification. 
Information concerning the courses may be obtained from departmental advisers. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in speech communication and theatre arts. To be graduated with the 



i37 



designation "Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts,'' they must 
successfully complete 281. Foi additional information members of the departmental 
faculty should be consulted. 

280. Special Seminar. (4) The intensive study of selected topics in communication. 
Topics may be drawn from any theory or concepts areas ol communication such as 
persuasion, organizational communication, film, oi theatre. 

281. Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. (4) A conference course 
involving intensive work in the area ol spec ial interest for selec ted senioi s who wish to 
graduate with departmental honors. 

282. Individual Study. (4) Special research and leadings in a choice ol interest to be 
approved and supervised by a faculty adviser. 

283. 284. Debate, Radio Television Film, or Theatre Arts Practicum. (2, 2) Individual 

projects in the student's choice ol debate, radio television film, oi theatre arts; 
includes organizational meetings, lacultv supervision, and faculty evaluation. No 
students may register foi more than two credits ol practicum in any semester. Xo 
student is allowed to take more than a total ol eight c ledit units in practicum, only four 
credits ol which may be counted toward a major in speech communication and 
theatre arts. Pass Fail only. 

Communication Public Address 

151. Public Speaking I. (4) A study ol the nature and fundamentals ol speech 
communication. Practice in (he preparation and delivery ol short speeches. 

152. Public Speaking II. ( 1) The preparation and presentation ol short speeches to 
inform, convince, actuate, and entertain. P-.Speech Communication 131. 

153. Interpersonal Communication. (4) The course is divided into three parts: 
communication theory, person-to-person communication, and small group 
interaction. 

155. Croup Communication. (4) An introduction to the principles ol discussion and 
deliberation in small groups, with prac tic e in group problem-solving and discussion 
leadership. 

161. Voice and Diction. (4) A study ol the principles of voice and production, with 
emphasis on phonetics as a basis for correct sound formation. 

231. Oral Interpretation of Literature. (4) Fundamentals of reading aloud, with 
emphasis on selection, analysis, and performance. 

251. Persuasion. (4) A study of the variables and contexts ol persuasion in 
contemporary society. 

252. Argumentation and Debate. (4) A study of the principles of argumentation; 
practical experience in researching and debating a public policy question. 

253. Rhetorical Theory. (4) A survey of the forms of rhetorical discourse in modern 
society, with emphasis on major theories. 

261. Clinical Management of Speech and Language Disorders. (4) Methods used to 



138 



correct speech disorders of voice, rhythm, language, and articulation; observation of 
methods used with selected cases in clinical or public school setting. Offered in 

alternate fall semesters. 

262. Audiology. (4) Clinical audiology, including anatomy, physiology, disorders of 
the healing mechanism, and interpretations of basic measurements of auditory 
function. Offered in alternate spring semesters. 

263. Speech and Language Disorders I. (4) Study ot the disorders of language, 
articulation, and rhythm, with special emphasis on functional disorders; focus is on 
the role the therapist plays in assisting the speech-handicapped child. Offered in 
alternate fall semesters. 

264. Speech and Language Disorders II. (4) Consideration of etiology and symptoms 
of speech and language problems due to organic disorders of voice, articulation, 
language, and hearing. Offered in alternate spring semesters. 

271. Communication Theory. (4) An introduction to theory-building in 
communication and to the major contemporary theorists in the field. P-Speech 
Communication 151 or permission ol (he instructor. 

280. Special Seminar. (4) (See previous description.) 

281. Honors Course. (4) (See previous description.) 

282. Individual Study. (4) (See previous description.) 

283. 284. Debate Practicum. (2, 2) (See previous description.) 

354. American Public Address. (4) The history and criticism of American public 
address from colonial times to the present. 

S355. Directing the Forensic Program. (4) A pragmatic study of the methods of 
directing high school and college forensics with work in the High School Debate 
Workshop. Offered in the summer. 

356. Black Rhetoric. (4) Study of selected black American speakers and their speeches. 
By listening to recorded speeches, reading manuscripts and background information, 
and discussing the speakers, the class traces the development of black rhetoric from the 
colonial period to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on the abolitionist, anti- 
segregationist, and black power movements. 

371. Research in Communication. (4) An introduction to design and statistical 
procedures for research in communication. 

372. A Survey of Organizational Communication. (4) An introduction to the role of 
communication in organizations, with emphasis on field applications. 

374. Mass Communication Theory. (4) Theoretical approaches to the role of 
communication in reaching mass audiences and its relationship to other levels of 
communication. Offered in alternate years. 

375. Communication and Conflict. (4) A study of communication in conflict 
situations on the interpersonal and societal levels. Offered in alternate years. P-Speech 
Communication 153 or permission of the instructor. 



139 



376. Small Group Communication Theory. (4) Advanced study of the principles of 
small group interaction and discussion leadership. P-Speech Communication 155 or 
permission of the instructor. 

378. Semantics and Language Behavior. (4) A study of the syntactic and semantic 
aspects of communicative messages. 

Radio/Television/Film 

241. Introduction to Broadcasting. (4) A study of the historical, legal, economic, and 
social aspects of broadcasting. 

245. Introduction to Film. (4) Historical introduction to motion pictures through the 
study of various kinds of films and their relationship to society. 

281. Honors Course. (4) (See previous description.) 

282. Individual Study. (4) (See previous description.) 

283. 284. Radio/Television Film Practicum. (2, 2) (See previous description.) 

341. Radio/Television/Film Production. (2, 2, 2) Advanced radio television film 
production workshop. May be taken more than once for two credits each time, but for 
no more than a total of six credits. P-Speech Communication 283, 284. 

342. Seminar in Radio/Television. (3 or 4) Extensive readings in and discussion of 
fundamental theory and current issues in radio and television. Offered on an eleven- or 
fifteen-week basis. Offered in the .spring. P-Speech Communication 241. 

346. Film Criticism. (3 or 4) A study of film aesthetics through an analysis of the work 
of selected film-makers and film critics. Offered on an eleven-or fifteen- week basis. 
Offered in the spring. P-Speech Communication 245. 

Theatre Arts 

121. Introduction to the Theatre. (4) A survey of all areas of theatre art. Experience in 
laboratory and University Theatre productions. May be used to satisfy a requirement 
in Division I. Lab-three hours. 

223. Stagecraft. (4) A study of the basic elements of theatre technology. Practical 
experience gained in laboratory and University Theatre productions. Open to 
freshmen and sophomores by permission of the instructor. Lab-five hours. 

226. Theories of Acting. (4) A study of acting theories and fundamental acting 
techniques. Open to freshmen and sophomores by permission of the instructor. Lab- 
two hours. 

227. Theatre Speech. (4) An intensive course in the analysis and correlation of the 
physiological, physical, and interpretive aspects of voice and diction on the stage. 

228. The Contemporary English Theatre. (4) An examination of the English theatre 
through reading, lectures, seminars, and attendance at numerous live theatre 
performances. The participants expected to submit written reactions to the plays 
which are seen. Ample time to allow for visits to museums, libraries, and historic 
places. Taught in London. Offered in January. P-Permission of the instructor. 



140 



281. Honors Course. (4) (See previous description.) 

282. Individual Study. (4) (See previous description.) 

283. 284. Theatre Arts Practicum. (2, 2) (See previous description.) 

320. Theatrical Scene Design. (4) A study of the theories and styles of stage design and 
their application to the complete play. P -Theatre Arts 121 and 223 or permission of 
the instructor. 

321. Play Directing. (4) An introduction to the theory and practice of play direc ting. A 
grade is not granted for this course until the student has completed Theatre Arts 322. 
Lab-two hours. P-Theatre Arts 121 and 226 or permission of the instructor. 

322. Play Production Laboratory. (2) A laboatory in the organization, the tec hniques, 
and the problems encountered in a dramatic production. The production of a play for 
public performance required. P-Theatre Arts 321. 

S324. Directing the Drama Program. (4) A study of the function of drama in the 
educational curriculum, with emphasis on the secondary level. Laboratory work in 
the High School Drama Workshop. Lab-six bonis. 

325. Advanced Acting. (4) A concentrated study of the actor's art through theory and 
practice. P-Theatre Arts 226 or permission of the instructor. 

327. Theatre History I. (4) A survey of the development of the theatre from its origins to 
1870; includes lee tines, readings, and reports. 

328. Theatre History II. (4) A survey of the development of the modern theatre from 
1870 to the present clay; includes lectures, readings, and reports. 

329. Advanced Theatre Speech. (4) Specific study in the theory and personal 
development of vocal melody, rhythm, color, and harmony according to the form, 
style, and mood of a theatrical production. P-Theatre Arts 227 or permission of the 
instructor. 




Ill 



Degrees Conferred 



James Edward Amos Jr. 
Mark Louis Anderson 
Joe Ross Beachum Jr. 
Ralph Earl Beasley Jr. 
Donna Yvonne Black 
Lee Anne Blanchard 
Becky Lynn Bowen 
Walter E. Dorset ( Jr. 
Mark Edward Ellis 
John Taylor Eield 
Leslie Veronica Gather 
Gerald Gregory Hopkins 
Ronald L. Hughes 



James Lucas Balch 
Robert William Bassett 
Roger Peter Brownlee 
David Pierce Butler 
Pamela Marie Giesler 
David Prank Gouwens 



August 4, 1976 
Bachelor of Arts 

John Wells Lassiter 
Scott Lane Lippman 
William Benjamin Miller Jr. 
William Allied Mvatt IV 
Tracy Jo Myers 
Susan Jeanette Patterson 
Glen Aulin Phillips 
William Randolph Stits 
Marcus Berrier Stokes 
Deborah Jean Abbott Tice 
Chester Ingersoll Warren III 
Charles Randall Welch II 
Mark Owen Yandle 

Bachelor of Science 

Walter Charles Hartel 
Stanton B. Ingram Jr. 
David William LaBaw 
Dennis Xavier Stress 
Michael Stephen Vernon 
John Hester Wagstaff 
Gregory Earl Womble 

February 4, 1977 
Bachelor of Arts 



Timothy Draughn Apple 
Susan Lorraine Baucom 
Jeffrey Malcolm Boyer 
William Darden Britt 
Anne Spargo Bryan 
Joseph H. Bunch 
Betsy S pence Butler 
James Thompson Cardwell 
Sylvia Francis Chesson 
Margaret Ann Crawley 
Timothy J. Croak 
James Harold Culbreth Jr. 
Benjamin Edward Davis 
Russell Clayton Dubberly Jr. 
Andrew Cooper Fix 



Benjamin Cochran Gage 
William Reed Lexer ton 
Cynthia A. Lewis 
James Donald McLeod 
David Kent Moberly 
Karen Jane Olash 
Randal Alexander Parks 
Daryl Eugene Peterson 
William Harper Ray III 
Dean Joseph Saitta 
Valery Clare Scott 
Henry Eugene Shore Jr. 
C. David Tabor 
Elizabeth Price Thornhill 
Ellen Lee Tillett 



142 



Anthony Lin Forrest 
Dana Lynn Holton 
Mary Scott McElwee 
Thomas K. Parker 



Miriam Elizabeth Acker 
Carol Faith Adair 
Maria Lopresti Agnello 
Felicia A. Altmeyer 
Katharine Marie Amato 
James Gordon Anderson 
Robert Eric Anderson 
Richard Douglas Archer 
Sanford Mitchell Archer 
Terry G. Athas 
Darnell Pace Austin 
Elizabeth Louise Bagby 
Sharon L. Baldwin 
Amelia Irini Bambalis 
Barbara Wrenn Banks 
Shelley Allen Banks 
Roger Edwin Barrows 
James Russell Batchelor Jr 
Forest Kim Bates 
William Henrichs Batten 
Harold Wade Beavers 
Margaret Rebeccah Beck 
Michael John Bednarik 
Martha Ann Bell 
Dorothy Bendall 
Andrew Bernard 
Robert Frederick Bethea 
Victoria Lee Bethel 
Richard Henry Bidlack 
Carl Clifton Black II 
Deborah Elaine Black 
Christopher Pickett Blair 
Holly Jean Blake 
William Hardy Blalock Jr. 
Charlotte Lillian Bolz 



Bachelor of Science 

Lewis D. Prather 
Diane Lynn Schneidei 
Rodolfo Eleazar Taboada 
Cynthia Paige Ward 
Ann Godfrey Williams 

May 16, 1977 
Bachelor of Arts 

Edwin Lineberry Booth Jr. 
Susan Margaret Bower 
Clifford Ricky Bowman 
John Walter Boyer III 
Alisa Renee Boyette 
Michael Dale Boyles 
Stephen Robert Briggs 
Evander Munn Britt III 
William Samuel Bntt 
Rebecca Leigh Brooks 
Douglas Arthur Brown 
Frederick T. Brown 
Lelia Jane Brown 
Simpson O. Brown Jr. 
John Conway Bryce 
Roger Rowe Buchanan 
Karen Ann Burdge 
Nancy Ruth Burnett 
Ann Eury Butner 
Carol Eugenia Butner 
Charles Lee Cain 
Othilia Yvette Carey 
Jeffrey N. Carl 
James Stanley Carmical 
Stephen Ray Carpenter 
Jeryl Leigh Casstevens 
Betty Lois Chambers 
Carol Jane Chandler 
Susan Marie Chandler 
Jeffrey Harding Chilton 
Charles Walter Clark Jr. 
Thomas Boston Clarkson III 
Michael Franck Clayton 
Stephen Walter Coles 
Ruth Anne Connelly 



143 



Cynthia Elizabeth Cook 
Gregory L. Cook 
Jacqueline Anne Crawford 
Horace Crump 
Gary Lee Dark 
Ann Elizabeth Davis 
James Michael Davis 
John Thomas Daws 
Sharon Lynne DeLong 
Kathy Susan Dickson 
Daniel Allen Dietz 
John Mark Dillon 
Jeffrey Wendell Dobbs 
Kathryn Ruth Don 
Deborah Joan Downey 
Jenny Jean Downing 
Julia Harper Drake 
Sarah Kent Drummond 
James Michael Dubinsky 
India Howard Early 
Thomas Arthur Edgerton 
Arthur Lee Edmonds Jr. 
Karen L. El kins 
Virginia Marie Espenshade 
William Hill Evans 
David Nelson Fan 
Thomas McLean Faw Jr. 
William Garland Ferrell Jr. 
Particia G. Fincher 
Prentiss Edwards Findlay IV 
Clinton Daggett Flagg 
Bruce A. Flint 
Paullette Thereasa Foman 
David Batchelder Foster 
Susan Cornelia Franz 
Stewart Allan Fraser 
Judith Kay Fritz 
Daniel Martin Fulton 
Gary Lance Gamache 
Lesley Robin Garett 
Virginia Hope Garrison 
Raymond R. Gatti 
Sharon E. Gibson 
Cheryl Ann Gilkeson 
Donald Anthony Girard 
Stephanie Morrow Glenn 



Susan Marguerite Gordon 

Thomas Russell Grant Jr. 

Cathy Lynn Green 

Linda Earlene Griffith 

Graig Richard Groves 

Cherry Gayden Gulledge 

Michael Charles Gunn 

Marianne Frances Guy 

L. Clark Hallman III 

L. Eri( Hallman 

Anne Craighead Hallowell 

William Hugh Hamilton III 

Shelley Rainold Hammond 

Rex Winfield Hanby 

John H. Hare 

Dan Alwyn Harrington Jr. 

Elizabeth W. Harris 

Hairy David Hawthorne Jr. 

Joe Billy Hazehvood Jr. 

John Richard Hazlett 

Priscilla Austin Healy 

Glenn Can Henderson Jr. 

Paid Richard Henning 

Jerry Marshall Hester 

Alanson Hinman Jr. 

Mark Timothy Hix 

Ann Elizabeth Hoffman 

Ned Wilson Holland Jr. 

James Frank Hollifield 

Barbara Boyce Howard 

Michael D. Hughes 

Vicki Susan Huneycutt 

Mary Hargrove Bellamy Hunsiker 

Margaret Prudence Irby 

Anne Memory Jackson 

Paul Michael Jansen 

Joel Snyder Jenkins Jr. 

Sandra Lee Jenkins 

Charles Evans Johnson 

Kathryn W. Johnson 

Rebecca Lee Johnson 

John Gregory Jones 

Barbara Suttle Joyce 

Cynthia Irene Kellis 

Mark Charles Kelly 

Michael C. Kennedy 



144 



Donald Murrell Kersey Jr. 

Rebecca Kay Killian 

Catherine Wyman Kimm 

Lewis Clark Kimmel Jr. 

John William King Jr. 

Kathy Jane King 

Nancy Kathryn Kinsey 

Robert Henry Klatte 

Kenneth Alan Kratz 

Joseph Alphonsus Kuhn III 

David William Kunz 

Randy Albert Ladutko 

Gary Mark Landwirth 

John Thomas Lane 

Dean Insley Langrall 

Margaret Priscilla Latham 

Robert Alexander Waters Latimer Jr. 

Henry Coleman Lawrence 

Kenneth Stuart Lee 

Randolph Marshall Lee 

Brain Patrick Lewis 

David Arthur Lewis 

Henry Lee Lewis Jr. 

Mitchell Ingram Lewis 

Joseph James Lexa 

George Frederic Littlewood 

Joseph Andrew Liverman Jr. 

James Blythe Lloyd 

Joyce Candace Love 

Barbara Joan Lukes 

David Scot McCampbell 

Michael McCardell 

Marta Elizabeth McCave 

William James McDermott Jr. 

Edwin Earl McDonald 

William J. McLeester III 

Mary Melissa McLeod 

Nancy Louise McLoughlin 

Rebecca Johnson McMillan 

Patrick Timothy McNally 

William Edmond McPeters Jr. 

Ronald Douglas McSwain 

James Howard MacDougall 

James Alphonse Mach 

Jill Dougal MacKinnon 

James Thomas Madden 



Alan Gary Maiorano 
Robert Wayne Malburg Jr. 
Arthur Davidson Mann 
Robert Alan Marley 
Joseph Stephen Marlowe 
Keith Calvert Martin 
Susan Angeline Martin 
Katherine Storey Martz 
Mark Edward Matheson 
James Ritchie Mauney 
Brian Robert Maxey 
Richard Daniel Meagley 
Sally Mendenhall 
David Sumner Mervine 
David Miles Metcalf 
George Lemuel Mewborn III 
Martha Lindsey Meyer 
Barry Kent Miller 
Marcus Cole Miller 
Charles Clark Milton Jr. 
Chere Elaine Mitchell 
Joan Carol Mize 
Danny G. Mobley 
Angelo-Gene Monaco 
William Kyle Mooney 
Jean Patricia Moore 
Sarah Boone Mooty 
Clinton Hey ward Morgan Jr. 
Jean Ann Moylan 
Richard Gary Muller 
Margaret Ann Murphy- 
Douglas Ervin Murray 
L. David Nave, Jr. 
Laura Day Naylor 
Ronald Martin Niland 
Victoria Lee Noble 
Craig Lawrence Nodtvedt 
Richard Scott Nowlan 
Deborah Joan O'Keefe 
Gregory O'Neal Ollison 
Eric Newell Olson 
Wanda Jo O'Neal 
Sara Lucy Overstreet 
Deborah Louise Owens 
Martin Monroe Pannell 
Sueanna Pvatt Peeler 



45 



John Francis Pendergast Jr. 
Stephen Todd Pendlebury 
Cynthia Jay Pendleton 
Glenn Richard Penny Jr. 
Richard Leonard Pinto 
Jannie Pittman 
Mark Joesph Pompilio 
Clarence Randy Pool 
Leonard John Porcelli Jr. 
Judy Lynn Powell 
Donald Carpenter Prentiss 
Caroll Andrew Pressley 
John Chesley Prouty 
Leigh Lu-Ann Puryear 
Leslie Jean Radford 
Susan Elaine Raines 
David Earl Ratclilfe 
Jane Evelyn Rawson 
Jan DuBose Reagan 
Howard Roger Reece 
Lisa Parker Reece 
Elizabeth Ann Reed 
Richard Harold Reid 
John Elsen Reinhart 
Melanie Sue Rhamey 
Andrew Forrest Richardson 
William Andrew Rivell 
Jean Carol Roberts 
David Frank Root 
Cheryl Ann Rosemond 
Davis Rutherford Ruark 
Stephen Bishop Rubinate 
Ernest L. Rushing 
Anita C. Saulsbury 
William R. Savage Jr. 
Margie Ann Sears 
Donald M. Sensing 
Craig Christopher Shaffer 
Michael David Shannon 
Christopher Thorne Shaper 
Shelia Ilona Shearin 
Roy Thomas Shelton 
Joe Michael Sherrill 
Douglas Wilson Shouse 
H. Robert Showers Jr. 
Sarah Nell Sizemore 



David Charles Slater 
Barbara Mason Smith 
Claudia Lynn Smith 
Mary Catherine Smith 
Richard Davis Smith Jr. 
Susan Ray Smith 
Thomas Clinton Smith 
Howard M. Steele IV 
Eric Sternberg 
Robert David Strachan 
Wallace E. Strugis III 
Janet Ellen Swaysland 
John Cooper Sweatman 
Mary Jo Sweeney 
Jayne Yvonne Sykes 
Robert Gregory Sykes 
Russell Edward Talley 
David Ferris Tamer 
Ann Russell Taylor 
Richard Dean Taylor 
Addie Clyde Tomblin II 
Catherine Marshall Townes 
Richard Littleton Trexler 
Peter Loren Tucker 
Catharyn Elizabeth lull 
Edwin Thomas Turner 
William E. Tyler II 
Gary Arthur Vukov 
Steven Bryan Waite 
Jacquelyn Kay Waldie 
Scott Thomas Walton 
Brent Allen Waniga 
Robert Joesph Wansker 
John Steven Waters 
Laura Bahnson Weathers 
Peter Trone Weedon 
William Christopher Wellborn 
Shelia Dianne Wheeler 
Donna Leigh Whisenhunt 
William Andrew White 
Ruth Aquila Whitworth 
Harlan Paul Wichelhaus 
Donna Lynn Wiley 
James Thomas Wilkes Jr. 
Deborah Jenkins Williams 
Pamela Wall Williams 



46 



Robert Dean Williams 
Arthur Lynwood Wilson III 
Mark Huntington Wilson 
Robert Raymond Winslow III 
Charles Robert Wolfe 
Selbert McRae Wood Jr. 
William Alexander Wood Jr. 
Randy Monroe Woodle 
Donald L. Woodsmall 



Elton Roland Wright 
Karen Elaine Wyatt 
William Hayes Wyttenbach 
Jennie Guy Yonce 
John Thomas York 
Roy Tate Young 
Kendal Dean Zagor 
Mark Cameron Zahn 
Alan Gerald Zyskowski 



Bachelor of Science 



Valerie Helen Adamson 
Vic ky Lee Allen 
Mary S. Anthony 
Mark Edward Atkinson 
David L. Bagwell 
Susan Wooding Bailey 
Ann Elizabeth Barnes 
Rebecca Jill Beach 
Amelia Hope Bel ton 
Ina Elizabeth Blackmore 
Virginia Reid Blair 
James Parker Boone 
Margaret Elizabeth Bowen 
Merle Gaye Bowen 
James McMillan Bowman 
Henry Phillip Braunlich Jr. 
Charles McBrayer Broadway Jr. 
Parris Franklin Brock 
Gilmer Stimpson Burdette 
Stephen Edward Burkholder 
William C. Cannon Jr. 
Ruth Ann Carpenter 
Nancy Carol Can 
Michael Louis Carter 
Cynthia J. Chesnut 
Stephen Wilson Christian 
Jeffrey Mark Cline 
Gregg Richmond Coker 
Kathy Simmons Collier 
Barbara Lynn Cording 
Charles Lemuel Cranford 
Michael Edward Czarnecki 
Steven Eugene Daniels 
Nancy Burgess Davis 



Julia J. Dean 

Jason Lee Delooze 

Bryan Anthony Dozier 

Bryan Craig Dunkum 

David Lawrence Lakes 

Robert Leo Ellison 

Per I than Eriksson 

William Earl Etson 

Ricky Lane Eudy 

Katherine Jo Fleming 

Anne Bowen Forrest 

Joan Franklin 

Jeffry Douglas Frisby 

Donald Billy Fulp 

Ann Irene Gadway 

Mary Brite Gamble 

Stephen Harry Gatter 

Everett Joseph Geer 

Martha Brockinton Gibson 

David Neil Gill 

Robert Sterling Glover 

Eva Ester Goco Gonzales 

Jean Ann Gordon 

William Rayford Grose Jr. 

James Daniel Hamilton 

Karen Lee Harris 

Steven Burton Helgeson 

Charles Edward Hobbs 

Timothy E. Hobbs 

Mary Lucinda Howe 

Zachariah Hampton Howerton III 

Thomas Clay Huber 

David Reid Huffman 

Lee Thompson Huffman 



147 



Jeffrey Scott Hutton 
Sybil Jeanne Jackson 
Kenneth Paul Jaye 
Charles Arthur Jones 
Franklin William Jones 
Charles Bedford Kane 
David Alan Keith 
Linda Marie Kelly 
Pamela Jane Kerr 
Mark Crier King 
Joseph Ridley Kinsey III 
Robert Edward Kirk 
James S. Kovarik 
Nancy Jo Kripner 
Gary Benjamin Lambert 
Raymond Leigh Lancaster 
Scott Edward Langton 
Joseph G. Lin 
Charles Lemuel Little Jr. 
Paul Breese Littmann Jr. 
Susan Robin Lockhart 
Sidney Robinson Lyle Jr. 
John Alley McCarthy 
Glenn William McCracken 
William Franklin McLeod Jr. 
Raymond Randall McMillan 
Ann Emilie MacNaughton 
Donna Lee Mai tin 
Stephanie Anne Meadows 
William Wayne Medlin 
Katherine Ann Meiburg 
Stephen Catch Miller 
Richard P. Montague 
Matthew Kirk Moore 
Donna Elaine Moreland 
David Lawrence Newton 
Kathryn Kay Nightlinger 
Jeffrey Kenneth Ohlinger 
David Evan Oi ton 
Joe Talmadge Owen Jr. 
Kathryn Ann Parker 
Thomas Edward Parker 
Mary Elizabeth Patterson 
Diane Kent Pearson 
William Garland Pendleton III 
Mary Ann Phillips 

Warren 



Richard Brian Pieringer 
Deborah Lynn Power 
Kenneth D'Arcy Gregory Ritchie 
Mark Douglas Robinson 
David Allan Rosenblatt 
William Eldon Russ 
Jeffrey Paul Sander 
John Win free Sanders Jr. 
Wade Earl Sanders 
Robert Jerome Schellenberg 
Jeffrey Michael Schneider 
Donald Boyd Search 
Eugene Myron Serba 
Roger Lee Shepard 
Roger Wade Shepard 
Bobby Dale Shepherd Jr. 
Ruth Ann Shope 
Joseph Perry Sills Jr. 
Donald Bruce Simons Jr. 
Evelyn Earle Sink 
Mary Jo Sisson 
David Earl Sizer 
Elaine Ruth Smith 
Michael Douglas Smith 
Colleen Michele Snavely 
Deborah Lynn Stew ait 
Ginger Haynes Stillman 
Harriet Louise Stimson 
Sharon Ruth Stocker 
Thomas Rogers Taylor II 
Robert Alston Team Jr. 
Scott Arthur Thacker 
Gerry O'Neal Tolson 
Camden Bruce Trimble 
Rodney Lee Trivette 
Susan Dean Tucker 
Charles Wendell Tyson 
Michael Raymond Walker 
Ruth Michele Ware 
Wilson Cannon Wearn Jr. 
John Allen Welker 
Mark Alan Williams 
Diana Elizabeth Rowe Wilson 
Susan Satterfield Wise 
Eric Charles Wiseman 
Benjamin Franklin Wood 
Jarvis Yearns 



148 



Distinctions Conferred 



Donna Yvonne Black 
Lee Anne Blanchard 
Mark Edward Ellis 



John Taylor Field 
David F. Gouwens 



Beckv Lynn Bowen 



Jeflrey Malcolm Boyer 
Anne Spargo Bryan 
Timothy J. Croak 
Dana Lvnn Holton 



August 4, 1976 

Cum Laude 

Leslie Veronica Garber 
John Wells Lassiter 
Deborah Jean Abbot Tice 

Magna Cum Laude 

Susan Jeanette Patterson 
Michael Stephen Vernon 

Summa Cum Laude 

Walter Charles Hartel 

February 4, 1977 

Cum Laude 

James Donald McLeod 
David Kent Moberly 
Elizabeth Price Thornhill 
Ellen Lee Tillett 



Andrew Cooper Fix 
Karen Jane Olash 



Magna Cum Laude 

Cynthia Paige Ward 
Ann Godfrey Williams 



May 16, 1977 
Cum Laude 



Miriam Elizabeth Acker 
Valerie Helen Adamson 
Vicky Lee Allen 
Richard Douglas Archer 
Sanford Mitchell Archer 
Shelley Allen Banks 
Ann Elizabeth Barnes 
Roger Edwin Barrows 
James Russell Batchelor Jr. 
William Henrichs Batten 
Martha Ann Bell 
Amelia Hope Belton 
Andrew Bernard 
Victoria Lee Bethel 



Richard Henry Bidlack 
Ina Elizabeth Blackmore 
James Parker Boone 
Margaret Elizabeth Bowen 
Alisa Renee Boyette 
Henry Phillip Braunlich Jr. 
Stephen Robert Briggs 
Evander Munn Britt III 
William Samuel Britt 
Lelia Jane Brown 
John Conway Bryce 
Gilmer Stimpson Burdette 
Karen Ann Burdge 
Ann Eury Butner 



149 



Charles Lee Cain 

Nancy Carol Can 

Jeryl Leigh Casstevens 

Carol Jane Chandler 

Susan Marie Chandler 

Stephen Walter Coles 

Charles Lemuel Cranford 

Jacqueline Anne Crawford 

Michael Edward Czarnecki 

John Thomas Daws 

Sharon Lynne DeLong 

Jason Lee DeLooze 

Kathy Susan Dickson 

Kathryn Ruth Dorr 

Deborah Joan Downey 

Bryan Anthony Dozier 

Julia Harper Drake 

James Michael Dubinsky 

Per Urban Eriksson 

William Hill Evans 

Patricia G. Fincher 

Clinton Daggett Flagg 

Katherine Jo Fleming 

David Neil Gill 

Donald Anthony Girard 

Thomas Russell Grant Jr. 

Michael Charles Cunn 

Marianne Frances Guy 

L. Eric Hallman 

Shelley Rainold Hammond 

Harry David Hawthorne Jr. 

John Richard Hazlett 

Steven Burton Helgeson 

Charles Edward Hobbs 

James Frank Hollifield 

Zachariah Hampton Howerton III 

Margaret Prudence Irby 

Anne Memory Jackson 

Joel Snyder Jenkins Jr. 

Charles Arthur Jones 

Linda Marie Kelly 

Catherine Wyman Kimm 

John William King Jr. 

Robert Edward Kirk 

Kenneth Alan Kratz 

Gary Mark Landwirth 



Robert Alexander Waters Latimer Jr. 

Kenneth Stuart Lee 

David Arthur Lewis 

Joseph James Lexa 

Barbara John Lukes 

Marta Elizabeth McCave 

Rebecca Johnson McMillan 

Joseph Stephen Marlowe 

Stephanie Anne Meadows 

Richard Daniel Meagley 

William Kyle Mooney 

Jean Patricia Moore 

Matthew Kirk Moore 

Sarah Boone Mooty 

Donna Elaine Moreland 

Clinton Heyward Morgan Jr. 

Jean Ann Moylan 

Margaret Ann Murphy 

Craig Lawrence Nodtvedt 

Wanda Jo O'Neal 

Sara Lucy Overtsreet 

Kathryn Ann Parker 

Mary Elizabeth Patterson 

Sueanna Pyatt Peeler 

Stephen Todd Pendlebury 

Mary Ann Phillips 

Richard Leonard Pinto 

Jannie Pittman 

Donald Carpenter Prentiss 

Jane Evelyn Rawson 

Jan DuBose Reagan 

Elizabeth Ann Reed 

Richard Harold Reid 

Ernest 1.. Rushing 

John Winfree Sanders Jr. 

Wade Earl Sanders 

H. Robert Show r ers Jr. 

Donald Bruce Simons Jr. 

Evelyn Earle Sink 

Mary Jo Sisson 

Barbara Mason Smith 

Mary Catherine Smith 

Sharon Ruth Stocker 

Janet Ellen Swaysland 

Mary Jo Sweeney 

David Ferris Tamer 



150 



Thomas Rogers Taylor II 
Gerry O'Neal Tolson 
Peter Loren Tucker 
Gary Arthur Vukov 
Jacquelyn Kay Waldie 
William Andrew White 
Donna Lynn Wiley 



James Thomas Wilkes Jr. 
Deborah Jenkins Williams 
William Alexander Wood Jr. 
Donald L. Woodsmall 
Karen Elaine Wyatt 
William Hayes Wyttenbach 
Mark Cameron Zahn 



Magna Cum Laude 



Felicia A. Altmeyer 
Barbara Wrenn Banks 
Dorothy Bendall 
Charlotte Lillian Bolz 
Merle Gave Bowen 
Susan Margaret Bower 
Nancy Ruth Burnett 
James Stanley Carmical 
Michael Franck Clayton 
Ann Elizabeth Davis 
Karen L. El kins 
Virginia Marie Espenshade 
Thomas McLean Faw Jr. 
Susan Cornelia Franz 
Lesley Robin Garrett 
Virginia Hope Garrison 
Stephanie Morrow Glenn 
Jean Ann Gordon 
Susan Marguerite Gordon 
Craig Richard Groves 
Anne Craighead Hallowell 
John H. Hare 
Elizabeth W. Harris 



Ned Wilson Holland Jr. 
Kathy Jane King 
Nancy Kathryn Kinsey 
David William Kunz 
John Thomas Lane 
James Howard MacDougall 
Jill Dougal MacKinnon 
Robert Alan Marley 
Katherine Ann Meilburg 
L. David Nave Jr. 
Katherine Kay Nightlinger 
Victoria Lee Noble 
Glenn Richard Penny Jr. 
Deborah Lynn Power 
Leigh Lu-Ann Puryear 
David Earl Ratcliffe 
David Frank Root 
Cheryl Ann Rosemond 
Thomas Clinton Smith 
Colleen Michele Snavely 
Ann Russell Taylor 
John Steven Waters 
Harlan Paul Wichelhaus 



Carol Faith Adair 
Katharine Marie Amato 
Carl Clifton Black II 
Steven Eugene Daniels 



Summa Cum Laude 

Thomas Arthur Edgerton 
Mark Timothy Hix 
Charles Evans Johnson 
Barry Kent Miller 
Catharyn Elizabeth Tull 



151 



August 4, 1976 

Graduating with Honors in German: Becky Lynn Bowen 

February 4, 1977 

Graduating with Honors in History: Jeffery Malcolm Boyer, Andrew Cooper 

Fix 

May 16, 1977 



Graduating with Honors in Accountancy: 
Graduating with Honors in 

Anthropology: 
Graduating with Honors in Chemistry: 
Graduating with Honors in Economics: 

Graduating with Honors in German: 
Graduating with Honors in History: 



Graduating with Honors in Latin: 
Graduating with Honors in Mathematics: 
Graduating with Honors in Politics: 

Graduating with Honors in Psychology: 



Graduating with Honors in Religion: 
Graduating with Honors in Romance 

Languages: 
Graduating with Honors in Speech 

Communication and Theatre Arts: 



Jean Ann Gordon 
Michael Charles Gunn 

Thomas Rogers Taylor II 

John Thomas Lane, Richard Daniel 
Meagley 

Ann Elizabeth Davis, Mary Jo Sweeney 

Richard Henry Bidlack, James Stanley 
Carmical, Charles Evans Johnson, 
Barbara Joan Lukes, David Frank 
Root, H. Robert Showers Jr. 

Rebecca Johnson McMillan 

Jason Lee DeLooze 

Michael Franck Clayton, Lesley Robin 
Garrett, James Frank Hollifield 

Stephen Robert Briggs, John Thomas 
Daws, L. Eric Hall man, Joseph Stephen 
Marlowe, Jean Ann Moylan, Glenn 
Richard Penny Jr., Jannie Pittman, 
Thomas Clinton Smith 

Carl Clifton Black II 

Virginia Marie Espenshade, James 
Frank Hollifield, Karen Elaine Wyatt 

Jean Patricia Moore, William Hayes 
Wvttenbach 



Omicron Delta Kappa 



Miriam Elizabeth Acker 
Katharine Marie Amato 
Barbara Wrenn Banks 
Carl Clifton Black II 
John Conway Bryce 
Stephanie Morrow Glenn 
Anne Memory Jackson 
Charles Evans Johnson 



David William Kunz 
Jill Elizabeth MacKinnon 
Katherine Ann Meiburg 
Douglas Ervin Murray 
Stephen Todd Pendlebury 
Elizabeth Ann Reed 
Colleen Michele Snavely 
Donald L. Woodsmall 



152 



Mortar Board 



Miriam Elizabeth Acker 
Katharine Marie Amato 
Barbara Wrenn Banks 
Carl Clifton Black II 
William Land Brown Jr. 
Kathryn Ruth Dorr 
Lesley Robin Garrett 
Donald Anthony Girard 
Stephanie Morrow Glenn 
Charles Evans Johnson 
Linda Marie Kelly 



Carol Faith Adair 
Katharine Marie Amato 
Barbara Wrenn Banks 
Carl Clifton Black II 
Charlotte Lillian Bolz 
Becky Lynn Bowen 
Merle Gave Bowen 
Susan Margaret Bower 
Nancy Ruth Burnett 
James Stanley Carmical 
Michael Franck Clayton 
Steven Eugene Daniels 
Ann Elizabeth Davis 
Thomas Arthur Edgerton 
Karen Laverne Elkins 
Thomas McLean Faw Jr. 
Andrew Cooper Fix 
Susan Cornelia Franz 
Lesley Robin Garrett 
Stephanie Morrow Glenn 
Jean Ann Gordon 
Susan Marguerite Gordon 
Craig Richard Groves 
Anne Craighead Hallowed 
Elizabeth Wemyss Harris 



David William Kunz 
Jill Elizabeth MacKinnon 
Rebecca Johnson McMillan 
Katherine Ann Meiburg 
Douglas Ervin Murray 
Craig Lawrence Nodtvedt 
Stephen Todd Pendlebury 
Elizabeth Ann Reed 
Harold Robert Showers Jr. 
Colleen Michele Snavely 
William Hayes Wvttenbach 



Phi Beta Kappa 



Mark Timothy Hix 
Ned Wilson Holland Jr. 
Charles Evans Johnson 
Nancy Kathryn Kinsey 
Susanna Jane Knutson 
David William Kunz 
James Howard MacDougall 
Jill Elizabeth MacKinnon 
Robert Alan Marley 
Katherine Ann Meiburg 
Barry Kent Miller 
Lester David Nave Jr. 
Kathryn Kay Nightlinger 
Karen Jane Olash 
Glenn Richard Penny 
Leigh Lu-Ann Puryear 
David Frank Root 
Cheryl Ann Rosemond 
Thomas Clinton Smith 
Colleen Michele Snavely 
Ann Russell Taylor 
Catharyn Elizabeth Full 
John Steven Waters 
Harlan Paul Wichelhaus 
William Hayes Wyttenbach 



Enrollment 



153 



The College 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Unclassified 

Total 



Fall 1977 



Men Women 



1957 



1122 



Total 



470 


255 


725 


464 


288 


752 


471 


268 


742 


521 


289 


810 


28 


<)'> 


50 



3079 



The Graduate School 
(Reynolda Campus) 
Master's Program 
Doctoral Program 
Unclassified 
Total 



79 


120 


199 


7 


3 


10 


7 


13 


20 


93 


136 


229 



The Graduate School 

(Hawthorne Campus) 
Master's Program 
Doctoral Program 
Unclassified 
Total 



18 


9 


27 


43 


15 


58 


3 


2 


5 


64 


26 


90 



The School of Law 



385 



92 



477 



The Babcock Graduate School 
of Management 

Master's Program 
Executive Program 
Total 



118 

60 

178 



30 
7 



37 



i IS 

67 



215 



The Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine 

Allied Health Programs 



320 
45 



7S 
86 



398 
131 



Total 



3042 



1577 



4619 



154 



North Carolina Counties 



Alamance 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Havwood 



vlen 


Women 


Total 


29 


12 


41 


3 


2 


5 


1 




1 


1 




1 


6 


3 


9 


2 


3 


5 


8 


6 


14 


1 


1 


2 


3 


6 


9 


1 


2 


3 


13 


6 


19 


19 


2 


21 


is 


8 


26 


7 


7 


14 


1 


1 


2 


<) 


4 


13 




1 


1 


18 


9 


27 


4 


3 


7 


2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


3 


13 


7 


20 


5 


6 


11 


7 


4 


11 


27 


14 


41 


1 




1 


33 


18 


51 


11 


9 


20 


7 


3 


10 


32 


20 


52 


8 


1 


9 


402 


248 


650 


4 


1 


5 


22 


19 


41 




1 


1 


3 




3 


6 


3 


9 


5 


1 


6 


119 


72 


191 


7 


3 


10 


4 


2 


6 


11 


8 


19 



155 



Henderson 
Hertford 
Hoke 
Hyde 
Iredell 
Jackson 
Johnston 
Jones 
Lee 
Lenior 
Lincoln 
Macon 
Madison 
Martin 
McDowell 
Mecklenburg 
Mitchell 
Montgomery 
Moore 
Nash 

New Hanover 
Northhampton 
Onslow- 
Orange 
Pamlico 
Pasquotank 
Pender 
Perquimans 
Person 
Pitt 
Polk 

Randolph 
Richmond 
Robeson 
Rockingham 
Rowan 
Rutherford 
Sampson 
Scotland 
Stanley 
Stokes 
Surry 
Swain 

Translyvania 
Tyrrell 
Union 
Vance 



7 


3 


10 


8 


3 


1 1 


2 


1 


3 


1 




1 


27 


11 


38 


4 




4 


12 


3 


15 


4 




4 


9 


3 


12 


15 


6 


21 


7 


5 


12 


2 


3 


5 


2 


1 


3 


6 


3 


9 


8 


1 


9 


24 


73 


197 


2 


1 


3 


9 


6 


15 


6 


5 


11 


14 


8 


22 


12 


6 


18 


3 


1 


4 


7 


4 


11 


13 


12 


25 


3 




3 




1 


1 


7 


5 


12 


12 


4 


K, 




1 


1 


13 


9 


22 


5 


4 


9 


23 


5 


28 


15 


9 


24 


25 


14 


39 


6 


3 


9 


5 


1 


6 


6 


4 


10 


10 


3 


13 


10 


13 


23 


24 


1 1 


35 


1 




1 


3 


3 


6 


11 


8 


19 


8 


2 


10 



56 



Wake 

Warren 

Washington 

Watagua 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 



97 


56 


153 


2 




2 


1 




I 


7 


1 


8 


7 


5 


12 


16 


8 


24 


16 


6 


22 


9 


10 


19 


1 


1 


o 


Other States 






Men 


Women 


Total 


7 


3 


10 


5 


1 


6 


2 


1 


3 


28 


6 


34 


3 


4 


7 


34 


10 


44 


21 


18 


39 


9 


3 


12 


140 


67 


207 


67 


30 


97 


1 


3 


4 




1 


1 


45 


9 


54 


14 


1 


15 


1 


2 


3 


4 


2 


6 


23 


10 


33 


1 


5 


6 


5 




5 


140 


79 


219 


15 


12 


27 


12 


7 


19 


4 


1 


5 


1 


2 


3 


7 


4 


11 


1 




1 


4 


1 


5 


7 


2 


9 


166 


55 


221 


1 




1 


121 


34 


155 


1 




1 


70 


33 


103 


3 


1 


4 



157 



Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Australia 

Bangladesh 

Cameroon 

Canada 

Cyprus 

Germany 

Ghana 

Hong Kong 

India 

Japan 

Kenya 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Mali 

Netherlands 

Nicaragua 

Nigeria 

Pakistan 

Peru 

Phillipines 

Portugal 

Puerto Rico 

Scotland 

Sierra Leone 

Singapore 

Sri Lanka 

Switzerland 

Taiwan 

Turkey 

United States Territories 



1 




1 


151 


43 


194 


4 




4 


71 


46 


120 


2 




2 


36 


29 


65 


13 


7 


20 


1 




1 


3 




3 


181 


134 


315 


3 


2 


5 


36 


20 


56 


7 


8 


1". 


1 




1 



Other Countries 

Men 



11 


Women 


Total 


2 




2 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2 




2 


1 




1 




3 


3 




4 


1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2 


1 


3 


1 




1 


2 




2 


2 




2 


1 




1 




1 


1 


1 




1 


6 


1 


7 


1 


2 


3 


2 


1 


3 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2 




2 


1 




1 




1 


1 


2 




2 




1 


1 


1 




1 


1 
2 




1 
2 



158 



The Board of Trustees 



Terms Expire December 31, 1978 



The Rev. Mr. E.E. Ferrell Jr., 

Black Mountain 
Mr. Robert R. Forney, Shelby 
Mr. C. C. Hope Jr., Charlotte 
The Rev. Dr. John M. Lewis, Raleigh 



Dr. Mary Lide Morris, Burlington 
Dr. W. Boyd Owen, Waynesville 
Mr. Lonie B. Williams, Wilmington 
Mr. William L. Wyatt Jr., Raleigh 
Mr. Robert W. Yelton, Shelby 



Terms Expire December 31, 1979 



Mrs. Polly Lambeth Blackwell, 

Winston-Salem 
Dr. John M. Cheek Jr., Durham 
Mr. James R. Gilley, Winston-Salem 
Mr. Brent Kincaid, Lenoir 



Mr. Petro Kulynych, North Wilkesboro 
Mr. Charles B. Martin, Tarboro 
Mr. James W. Mason, Laurinburg 
Dr. George W. Paschal Jr., Raleigh 
Mr. Leon L. Rice Jr., Winston-Salem 



Terms Expire December 31, 1980 



The Rev. Dr. A. Douglas Aldrich, 

Gastonia 
Mr. M. Alexander Biggs, 

Rocky Mount 
Mr. Howard Bullard, Fayetteville 
Mr. Roger P. Davis, Winston-Salem 



Mrs. E. Reed Gaskin, Charlotte 
Mr. Weston P. Hatfield, 

Winston-Salem 
Mrs. Sara Page Lewis, Charlotte 
Mr. J. Robert Philpott, Lexington 
Dr. D. E. Ward Jr., Lumberton 



Terms Expire December 31, 1981 



Mr. E. Lee Cain, High Point 
Dr. Gloria F. Graham, Wilson 
The Rev. Mr. Ray K. Hodge, Kinston 
Mr. James L. Johnson, Rowland 



Dr. C. Hunter Moricle, Reidsville 
Mr. W. Linville Roach, Greensboro 
Mr. Colin Stokes, Winston-Salem 
The Rev. Mr. Charles Tanner, Garner 



Mr. Richard A. Williams, Newton 

Officers 

(For one-year terms beginning January 1, 1978) 

Mr. James W. Mason, Laurinburg, Chairman 

Dr. W. Boyd Owen, Waynesville, Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Elizabeth S. Drake, Winston-Salem, Secretary 

Mr. John G. Williard, Winston-Salem, Treasurer and Assistant Secretary 

Mrs. Meyressa H. Schoonmaker, Winston-Salem, Associate General Counsel 

Womble, Carlyle, Sandridge & Rice, Winston-Salem, General Counsel 



59 



The Board of Vistors 



January 1, 1978 



Dr. K. Wayne Smith, Washington 

Dr. William C. Archie, Winston-Salem 

Mr. Jerry B. Attkisson, Atlanta 

Mr. William N. Austin, Los Angeles 

Mr. Herbert Brenner, Winston-Salem 

Mr. Robert P. Caldwell, Gastonia 

Mr. D. Wayne Calloway, Dallas 

Dr. John W. Chandler, Williamston, Massachusetts 

Mrs. Benjamin Cone Jr., Greensboro 

Mr. H. Max Craig Jr., Stanley 

Dr. Wilton Dillon, Washington 

Mr. Arthur E. Earley, Cleveland 

Mrs. Aurelia Gray Eller, Winston-Salem 

Mr. John Fairchild, New York 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank Forsyth, Winston-Salem 

Mr. Stanley Frank, Greensboro 

Mr. James R. Gilley, Winston-Salem (ex officio) 

Ms. Patricia O'Neil Goodyear, Baltimore 

Dr. W. Burnett Harvey, Boston 

Mr. Harold T. P. Hayes, New York 

Dr. E. Garland Herndon, Atlanta 

Mrs. Dorothy Carpenter Howard, Winston-Salem 

Mr. R. O. Huffman, Morganton (honorary) 

Mr. Hubert B. Humphrey Jr., Greensboro 

Mr. Gerald Johnson, Baltimore (honorary) 

Mr. Joseph W. Jones, Atlanta 

Mr. George W. Kane Jr., Durham 

Dr. Nancy C. Kester, New York 

Mr. William F. Laporte, New York 

Brig. Gen. Lynwood Lennon, Washington 

Mr. Albert S. Lineberry Sr., Greensboro 

Dr. J. A. Martin Jr., New York 

Mr. Martin Ma; er, New York 

Mr. John G. Medlin Jr., Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Katharine Babcock Mountcastle, Darien 

Dr. Campbell McMillan, Chapel Hill 

Dr. Eugene Owens, Charlotte 

Mr. James R. Peterson, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Lorraine F. Rudolph, Winston-Salem 

Mr. Zachary T. Smith, Winston-Salem 

Mr. Norman Snead, Yorktown 

Ms. Jo DeYoung Thomas, Washington 

The Hon. Frank Thompson, Washington 

Mr. Patrick L. M. Williams, Philadelphia 

Mr. George Williamson Jr., Poughkeepsie 

Mr. Meade H. Willis Jr., Winston-Salem 

Mr. J. Tylee Wilson, Winston-Salem 

Dr. K. Wayne Smith, Washington, Chairman 




President James Ralph Scales 



161 

The Administration 



University 

*James Ralph Scales (1967) President 

B.A., Oklahoma Baptist; M.A., Ph.D., Oklahoma; Litt.D., 
Northern Michigan; LL.D., Alderson-Broaddus; LL.D., Duke 

**Edwin Graves Wilson (1946, 1951) Provost 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

Manson Meads (1947, 1963) Vice President for Health Affairs and 

B.A., California; M.D., Sc.D., Temple Director of the Medical Center- 

John G. Williard (1958) Vice President and Treasurer 

B.S., North Carolina; C.P.A., North Carolina 

Russell H. Brantley Jr. (1953) Assistant to the President and 

B.A., Wake Forest Director of Communications 

Meyressa H. Schoonmaker (1975) Assistant to the President and 

B.A., J.D., Wake Forest Associate General Counsel 

Henry B. Stokes (1977) Director of Denominational Relations 

B.A., Wake Forest; Th.B., Southern Baptist Seminary 

N. Rick Heatley (1970) Associate in Academic Administration 

B.A., Baylor; M.A., Ph.D., Texas 

Martha E. Shore (1976) Director of Research and 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina Foundations Officer 

College 

Thomas E. Mullen (1957) Dean of the College 

B.A., Rollins; M.A., Ph.D., Emory 

Robert Allen Dyer (1956) Associate Dean 

B.A., Louisiana State; Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

Toby A. Hale (1970) Assistant Dean 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Duke; Ed.D., Indiana 

Patricia Adams Johnson (1969) Academic Counselor 

B.A., Winston-Salem State; M.A., Wake Forest 

Laura V. Rouzan Academic Counselor 

B.A., Xavier; M.A., Georgia 



*Dates following names indicate year of appointment. 
** Absent on leave, spring 197S. 



IbL' 



Graduate School 



Henry Smith Stroupe (1937) 

B.S.. M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D.. Duke 

Harold O. Goodman (1958) 

B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D.. Minnesota 



School of La^ 



Pasco M. Bowman II (1970) 

B.A., Bridgewater; J.D.. New York 

Buddy O. Herring II (1973) 
B.A., J.D.. Wake Forest 

Gail O. Dona way (1976) 

B.A., New Hampshire; M.Ed., Miami 



Dean of the Graduate School 

Associate Dean for Biomedical 
Graduate Studies 

Dean of the School of Law 
Assistant Dean 



Director of Placement and 
Financial Aid 



Babcock Graduate School of Management 



Frank J. Schilagi (1971) 

B.B.A.. M.B.A., Ph.D., Georgia 

Bernard L. Beatty (1974. 1976) 

B.S.. Ohio State; M.B.A., Ph.D., Harvard 



Dean of the Babcock Graduate 
School of Management 

Associate Dean 



Jean B. Hopson (1970) Assistant Dean 

B.S. in Ed., Murray State; M.S. in L.S., George Peabody; M.B.A., Wake Forest 



Bowman Gray School of Medicine 



Richard Janeway (1966) 

B.A., Colgate; M.D., Pennsylvania 

Nat E. Smith (1976) 

B.A. Erskine; M.D., Georgia 

C. Nash Herndon (1942, 1966) 
B.A.. Duke; M.D., Jefferson 

Clyde T. Hardy Jr. (1941) 
B.A., Richmond 

Warren H. Kennedy (1971) 
B.B.A.. Houston 

John D. Tolmie (1970) 

B.A., Hohart; M.D., McGill 

Emery C. Miller Jr. (1955) 



Dean of the Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine 

Associate Dean 

Associate Dean for Research Development 

Associate Dean for Patient Services 

Associate Dean for Administration 

Associate Dean for Student Affairs 

Associate Dean for Continuing Education 



B.A., North Carolina; M.D., Johns Hopkins 



163 



James C. Leist (1974) Assistant Dean for Continuing Education 

B.S., Southeastern Missouri State; M.S., Ed.D., Indiana 

B. Lionel Truscott (1968) Associate Dean for Admissions 

B.A., Drew; M.A., Syracuse; M.S., Ph.D., M.D., Yale 

Summer Session 

Percival Perry (1939, 1947) Dean of the Summer Session 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Rutgers; Ph.D., Duke 

Student Services 

David Allen Hills (1960) Coordinator of Student Sennces 

B.A., Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa 

Mark H. Reece (1956) Dean of Men 

B.S., Wake Forest 

Lula M. Leake (1964) Dean of Women 

B.A., Louisiana State; M.R.F., Southern Baptist Seminary 

David L. Robertson (1975) Director of the College Union and 

B.A., Lenior Rhyne; M.Ed., Georgia Assistant to the Dean of Men 

Edward R. Cunnings (1974) Director of Housing 

B.S.M., M.Ed., St. Lawrence 

Edgar D. Christman (1956, 1961) Chaplain 

B.A., J.D., Wake Forest; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; S.T.M., Union Seminary 

*Richard W. McBride (1969) Assistant Chaplain and Director 

B.S., Virginia; M.Div., Union Seminary of the Baptist Student Union 

Brian M. Austin (1975) Director of the Center for 

B.A., Monmouth; Ph.D., Southern Illinois Psychological Seri'ices 

Howard A. Jemison Jr. (1964) Director of the Health Sennce 

M.D., Wake Forest 

Andrew J. Crutchfield (1968) Consultant in Clinical Services 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Virginia 

Records and Institutional Research 

Ben M. Seelbinder (1959) Director of Records and 

B.A., Mississippi Delta State; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina Institutional Research 

Margaret R. Perry (1947) Registrar 

B.S., South Carolina 

David Gasque (1974) Assistant Registrar 

B.A., Wake Forest 



^Absent on leave, 1977-78. 



164 



Admissions and Financial Aid 

William G. Starling (1958) Director of Admissions and 

B.B.A., Wake Forest Financial Aid 

Shirley P. Hamrick (1957) Associate Director of Admissions 

B.A., North Carolina; M.A. in Ed., Wake Forest 

Charles M. Carter (1972) Admissions and Financial Aid Counselor 

B.S., Winston-Salem; M.S., Indiana 

Thomas (). Phillips (1974) Scholarships Officer 

B.A., Wake Forest 

W. Douglas Bland (1975) Admissions Counselor 

B.A., M.A., in Ed., Wake Forest 

Ellen Coats (1976) Admissions Counselor 

B.A., Wake Forest 

Personnel and Placement 

James L. Ferrell (1975) Director of Personnel 

B.A., North Carolina; M.S., Virginia Commonwealth 

Carol S. Disque (1976) Director of Placement and 

B.A., Duke; M.Ed., Virginia Career Development 

Ross A. Griffith (1966) Director of Equal Opportunity 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.Ed., North Carolina 

Communications and Publications 

Russell H. Brantley Jr. (1953) Assistant to the President and 

B.A. Wake Forest Director of Communications 

Martha W. Lentz (1973) Associate in Publications 

B.A., North Carolina 

William E. Ray (1975) Associate in Communications and 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina Director of Concerts 

Development and Alumni Affairs 

Julius H. Gorpening (1969) Director of Estate Planning 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

George William Joyner Jr. (1969) Director of Alumni Affairs 

B.A., Wake Forest 

H. Douglas Pee (1973) Director of University Relations 

B.A., Richmond; B.D., S.T.M., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Iowa 

Robert D. Mills (1972) Assistant Director of Alumni Affairs 

B.A., Wake Forest 

Marc C. Miller (1977) Assistant to the Director of Alumni Affairs 

B.A. Wake Forest 



165 



Financial Affairs 

John G, Williard (1958) Vice President and Treasurer 

B.S., North Carolina; C.P.A., North Carolina 

Carlos O. Holder (1969) Controller 

B.B.A., Wake Forest 

Phillip D. Denny (1977) Assistant Controller 

B.S., Mars Hill; C.P.A., North Carolina 

Libraries 

Men ill G. Bei throng (1964) Director of Libraries 

B.A., Tufts; M.A., Fletcher; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

Vivian L. Wilson (1960) Librarian of the School of Law 

B.A., Coker; B.S. in L.S.. George Peabody 

Jean B. Hopson (1970) Librarian of the Graduate School of Management 

B.S. in Ed., Murray State; M.S. in L.S., George Peabody; MBA.. Wake Forest 

Michael D. Sprinkle (1972) Librarian of the School of Medicine 

B.A., M.S. in L.S., North Carolina 

Richard J. Murdoch (1966) Assistant to the Director and 

B.A.. Pennsylvania Military; M.S. in L.S., Villanova Curator of Rare Books 

Athletics 

G. Eugene Hooks (1956) Director of Athletics 

B.S.. Wake Forest; M.Ed., North Carolina; Ed.D., George Peabody 

Patrick Gainey (1976) Director of Sports Information 

B.A., North Carolina 

Bruce Herman (1976) Assistant Director of Sports Information 

B.A., Wake Forest 

Robert Bartholomew (1969) Director of the Deacon Club 

B.A., Wake Forest 

Carl Tacy (1972) Head Basketball Coach 

B.A., Davis and Elkins; M.S.. Radford 

Ed Hall (1976) Assistant Basketball Coach 

B.A., Southern Florida; M.S.. Old Dominion 

David Odom (1976) Assistant Basketball Coach 

B.A., Guilford; M.Fd., Fast Carolina 

Marvin Crater (1976) Head Baseball Coach 

J. William Dellastatious (1975) Cross Country and Track Coach 

B.S., M.S., Missouri 

John Mackovic (1978) Head Football Coach 

B.A.. Wake Forest; M.Fd., Miami 



166 



Gary Blackney (1978) 

B.A., M.S., Connectit ui 

William Faircloth (1978) 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Alabama 

Martin Galbraith (1978) 



Assistant Football Coach 
Assistant Football Coach 



Assistant Football Coach 



B.S., Missouri Southern State; M.S., Northwest Missouri State 



James McNally (1978) 
B.S., M.Ed., Buffalo 

Raymond Sherman (1978) 
B.S., San Jose State 

Archie Strimel (1978) 

B.A., M.Ed., Miami 

Michael Working (1978) 

B.A., North Carolina; ALA., Tennessee 

Cliff Yoshida (1973) 

B.S., California State Polytechnic 

Jesse Haddock (1954, 1977) 
B.S., Wake Forest 

Tom Aim (1977) 

B.A., Wake Forest 

James Leigh ton (1962) 
B.A., Presbyterian 

Lewis Martin (1958) 

Joe Lee Puckett (1971) 

B.A., Wake Forest 

David Tinga (1973) 

Dorothy Casey (1949) 

B.S., North Carolina; M.A., North Carolina 

Marjorie Crisp (1947) 

B.S., Appalachian; M.A., George Peabody 

Caroline Brown (1977) 
B.S., Furman 

Gail L. Sailer (1977) 

B.A., Bowling Green; M.A., North Carolina 

Stewart Smith (1977) 

B.A., North Carolina 

Barbara L. Warren (1976) 

B.S., Missouri; M.S., Indiana 



Assistant Football Coach 

Assistant Football Coach 

Assistant Football Coach 

Assistant Football Coach 

Assistant Football Coach 

Golf Coach 

Swimming Coach 

Tennis Coach 

Trainer 

Academic Adviser and 
Assistant Trainer 

Equipment Supervisor 

Director of Women's Athletics 

Coif Coach 

Field Hockey Coach 

Cross Country Coach 

Tennis Coach 

Basketball and Volleyball Coach 



167 



Other Administrative Offices 



R. Davidson Burgess (1974) 

B.S., Concord; M.A., Marshall 

Julian C Burroughs Jr. (1958) 

B.A.. Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Mulligan 

Richard T. Clay (1956) 
B.B.A., Wake Forest 



Director of Bands 

Director of Radio 

Director of University Stores 



Thomas M. Elmore (1962) Director of Counselor Education 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., George Peabody; Ph.D., Ohio State 

Paul M. Gross Jr. (1959) Coordinator of the Honors Program 

B.S.. Duke; Ph.D., Brown 



Technical Director of Theatre 

Director of Choirs 

Director of the Physical Plant 



Russell E. Hoik hen (1976) 

B.A., Fast Washington Stale; M.A.. Oregon 

John V. Mochnick (1976) 

B.M., Heidelberg; M.M., Indiana 

Harold S. Moore (1953) 
B.M.F., Virginia 

Herman J. Preseren (1953) Director of the Educational Media Center 

B.S., California State (Pennsylvania); M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Susan Tamulonis (1976) Art Slide Curator 

B.A., Pennsylvania State; M.A., Southern Methodist 

Harold C. Tedford (1965) Director of Theatre 

B.A., Ouachita; M.A., Arkansas; Ph.D., Louisiana State 



Donald H. Wolfe (1968) 

B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois; Ph.D., Cornel 



Associate Director of Theatre 




Proi'ost and Professor of English Edwin Grai>es Wilson 



168 



The College Faculty 



Gary E. Adams (1975) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., M.A., California State; Ph.D., Southern Illinois 

Kathrynn A. Adams (1976) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S.. M.A., Ph.D.. Alabama 

Charles M. Allen (1941) Professor of Biology 

B.S., MA., Wake Forest; Ph.D.. Duke 

Ralph D. Amen (1962) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., M.A., Northern Colorado; M.B.S., Ph.D., Colorado 

John L. Andronica (1969) Associate Professor of Classical Languages 

B.A.. Holy Cross; M.A., Boston College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

John William Angell (1955) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; S.T.M., Andover Newton; I h.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

Bianca Artom (1975) Lecturer in Romance Languages 

Brian M. Austin (1975) Lecturer in Psychology 

B.A., Monmouth; Ph.D., Southern Illinois 

H. Wallace Baird (1963) Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Berea; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

E. Pendleton Banks (1954) Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., Furman; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

James P. Barefield (1963) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Rite; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

Richard C. Barnett (1961) Professor of History 

B.A.. Wake Forest; M.Ed., Ph.D., North Carolina 

John V. Baxley (1968) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Georgia Tech; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

Robert C. Beck (1959) Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. Ph.D.. Illinois 

Very] E. Becker (1969) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Gustavus Adolphus; M.S., South Dakota State; Ph.D., Michigan State 

Merrill G. Berthrong (1964) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Tufts; M.A., Fletcher; Ph.D.. Pennsylvania 

*Susanne Beswick (1977) Lecturer in Literature and Theatre 

B.A., Bristol 

Liane Bidwell (1976) Instructor in Psychology 

B.A., Antioch; M.S.W., Adelphi; M.A.. Wake Forest 

*Part-time. 



169 



Miles (). Bidwell (1972) Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Columbia 

*David Bindman (1977) Lecturer in Art History. 

B.A., Magdalen College, Oxford; M.A.. Oxford; Ph.D., Courtauld Institute 

•Elizabeth Bonner (1977) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.A., Furman; M.A., Wake Forest 

W. Thomas Boone (1973) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Northwestern State; Ph.D., Florida State 

fSterling M. Boyd (1968) Associate Professor of Art 

B.A., Sewanee; M.A., Oberlin; Ph.D., Princeton 

Jesse C. Brackett Jr. (1975) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

B.S., North Carolina State; M.B.A., Wake Forest 

Germaine Bree (1973) Kenan Professor of Humanities 

Licence, E.E.S., Agregation, Paris, Litt.D., Smith, Mount Holyoke, Allegheny. 
Duke, Oberlin, Dickinson, Rutgers, Wake Forest, Brown, Wisconsin, New York, 
Massachusetts, Kalamazoo; L.H.D., Wilson, Colby, Michigan, Davis and Elkins; 
LL.D., Middlebur) 

Charles H. Breeden (1977) Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S., B.A., Florida; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 

Robert W. Brehme (1959) Professor of Physics 

B.S., Roanoke; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina 

David M. Broyles (1966) Associate Professor of Politics 

B.A., Chicago; B.A., Florida; M.A.. Ph.D., California 

George McLeod Bryan (1956) Professor of Religion 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Ph.D., Yale 

Shasta M. Bryant (1966) Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina 

Julian C. Burroughs Jr. (1958) Professor of Speech Communication 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan 

William E. Cage (1967) Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Rockford; Ph.D., Virginia 

Richard D. Carmichael (1971) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

•Wallace Carroll (1974) Sam J. Ervin Jr. University Lecturer 

B.Litt., Marquette; LL.D., Duke; Litt.D., Wake Forest; Litt.D., Marquette 

John A. Carter Jr. (1961) Professor of English 

B.A., Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton 

Dorothy Casey (1949) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.A., North Carolina 



*Part-time. 

\0n leave, 1977-1978. 

**Part-time, spring 1978. 



170 



*David W. Catron (1963) Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Furman; Ph.D., George Peabody 

Glenn L. Clark Jr. (1976) Lecturer in Business 

B.A., Ohio Stale; MB. A.. Kentucky 

Linda N. Clark (1971) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Stetson; M.S., Ed.D., I ennessee 

Marvin S. Coats (1976) Lecturer in Art 

B.S.A., East Texas State; M.F.A., Oklahoma 

John E. Collins (1970) Associate Professor of Religion 

B.S., M.S., Tennessee; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 

Gary A. Cook (1975) Instructor in Art 

B.F.A., Michigan State; M.F.A.. Northern Illinois 

Leon P. Cook Jr. (1957) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic ; M.S., Tennessee; C.P.A., Arkansas 

John B. Coullaid (1977) Instructor in Accountancy 

B.S.E.E., Louisiana State; M.B.A., Syracuse 

Cyclone Covey (1968) Professor of History 

B.A.. Ph.D., Stanford 

Frances Creighton (1976) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., Marshall; M.A., Tennessee 

Deborah S. David (1975) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., M.A., Florida 

Nancy Deese (1977) Instructor in Education 

B.A., St. Rose 

J. William Dellastatious (1975) Lecturer in Physical Education 

B.S.. M.S., Missouri 

Arun P. Dewasthali (1975) Assistant Professor of Business 

B.S.. Bombay; M.S., Ph.D.. Delaware 

John F. Dimmick (1961) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S.. Western Illinois; Ph.D.. Illinois 

Ronald V. Dimock Jr. (1970) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., New Hampshire; M.S., Florida State; Ph.D., California 

Han T. Doan (1977) Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A.. M.A., Saigon; M.P.A., National Institute (Siagon); Ph.D., Brigham Young 

**Joseph Dodson (1977) Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.A., Western Carolina; M.Ed., Ed.D., Georgia 

**Thomas E. Dougherty Jr. (1977) Visiting Lecturer in Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Ph.D.. Southern Baptist Seminary 



*On leave. 1977-78. 
**Part-time. 



7! 



Robert H. Dufort (1961) Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Ph.D., Duke 

Robert Allen Dyer (1956) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Louisiana State; Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

John R. Earle (1963) Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina 

Leo Ellison Jr. (1957) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., M.S., Northwestern State 

Thomas M. Elmore (1962) Professor of Education and Counseling Psychology 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., George Peabody; Ph.D.. Ohio State 

Gerald W. Esch (1965) Professor of Biology 

B.S., Colorado College; M.S., Ph.D.. Oklahoma 

Andrew V . Ettin (1977) Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Rutgers; M.A., Ph.D., Washington 

Herman E. Line (1974) Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Maryland State; Ph.D., Wake Forest 

David K. Evans (1966) Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.S., Tulane; Ph.D., California 

Stephen Ewing (1971) Associate Professor of Business 

B.S., Howard Payne; M.B.A.. Baylor; D.B.A., Texas Tech 

*Philippe R. Falkenberg (1969) Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Queens (Ontario); Ph.D., Duke 

Doranne Fenoaltea (1977) Visiting Associate Professor of Romance Eanguages 

B.A., Mount Holyoke; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

Jack D. Fleer (1964) Associate Professor of Politics 

B.A., Oklahoma Baptist; M.S., Florida State; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Carl B. Fliermans (1976) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Asbury; M.S., Kentucky; Ph.D., Indiana 

Walter S. Flory (1963) Babcock Professor of Botany 

B.A., Bridgewater; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia; Sc.D., Bridgewater 

Doyle R. Fosso (1964) Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Harvard; M.A., Michigan; Ph.D., Harvard 

tRalph S. Fraser (1962) Professor of German 

B.A., Boston; M.A., Syracuse; Ph.D., Illinois 

**Donald E. Frey (1972) Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Wesleyan; M.Div., Vale; Ph.D.. Princeton 



*On leave, fall 1977. 
'fOn leave, spring 197 S. 
**On leave, 1977-1978. 



172 



*Caroline S. Fullerton (1969) Instructor in Theatre Arts 

B.A., Rollins; M.A., Texas Christian 

Nazareth Gengozian (1971) Adjunct Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D.. Wisconsin 

Ivey C. Gentry (1949) Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. Wake Forest; B.S., New York; M.A., Ph.D.. Duke 

J. Whitfield Gibbons (1971) Adjunct Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.A., Alabama; Ph.D., Michigan State 

Christopher Giles (1951) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Florida Southern; M.A., George Peabody 

# Gilda Glazer (1977) Instructor in Music 

B.A., Queens; M.A., Columbia 

Kathleen Glenn (1974) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Stanford 

Balkrishna Govind Gokhale (1960) Professor of History and Asian Studies 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Bombay 

Thomas F. Gossett (1967) Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist; Ph.D., Minnesota 

Edward L. Grant (1977) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

B.B.A., Texas A & M 

Floyd L. Griffin Jr. (1975) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., Florida Tech 

George J. Griffin (1948) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; Th.B., Southern Baptist Seminary; B.D., Yale; Ph.D., Edinburgh 

Paul M. Gross Jr. (1959) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Duke; Ph.D., Brown 

William H. Gulley (1966) Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina 

David W. Hadley (1966) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

Emmett Willard Hamrick (1952) Professor of Religion 

B.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., Duke 

Phillip J. Hamrick Jr. (1956) Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Morris Harvey; Ph.D., Duke 

Carl V. Harris (1956) Professor of Classical Languages 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., S.T.M., Yale; Ph.D., Duke 

*Lucille S. Harris (1957) Instructor in Music 

B.A., B.M., Meredith 

*Part-time. 



173 



*Negley Boyd Harte (1978) Lecturer in History 

B.S., London School of Economics 

Ysbrand Haven (1965) Professor of Physics 

Candidate, Doctorandus, Doctor, Groningen 

*D. Swan Haworth (1977) Visiting Lecturer in Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

Elmer K. Hayashi (1973) Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., California; M.S., San Diego State; Ph.D., Illinois 

Michael D. Hazen (1974) Assistant Professor of Speech Communication 

B.A., Seattle Pacific; M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Kansas 

Roger A. Hegstrom (1969) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., St. Olaf; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

Robert M. Helm (1940) Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D.. Duke 

J. Edwin Hendricks (1961) Professor of History 

B.A., Furman; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

Marcus B. Hester (1963) Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Vanderbilt 

David Allen Hills (1960) Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa 

Alice V. Hinckley (1977) Instructor in Classical Languages 

B.A., Smith 

Willie L. Htnze (1975) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.A., Sam Houston State; Ph.D., Texas A & M 

Louise Hoffman (1975) Visiting Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Michigan State; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 

**Fred L. Horton Jr. (1970) Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., North Carolina; B.D., Union Seminary; Ph.D., Duke 

William L. Hottinger (1970) Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois 

Fredric T. Howard (1966) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., M.A., Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Duke 

Nancy H. Hubers (1977) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., M.A., Roosevelt; Ed.D., Northern Illinois 

fArleigh E. Hudspeth J'isiting Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Butler; M.A., Wisconsin; M.A., Chicago; Ph.D., North Carolina 

John Hutslar (1977) J'isiting Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Ohio State; M.S., Pennsvlvania State; Ph.D.. Ohio State 



*Part-time. 

**On leave, spring 1978. 

^Part-time, fall 1977. 



17, 



Sarah Hutslar (1977) Visiting Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S.. Ohio State; M.Ed., Miami; Ph.D., Ohio State 

Delmer P. Hylton (1949) Professor of Accountancy 

B.S., M.B.A., Indiana; C.P.A., Indiana 

*Charles F. Jackels (1977) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B. Chem., Minnesota; Ph.D., Washington 

*Susan C. Jackels (1977) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Carleton; Ph.D., Washington 

Rebecca C. Jann (1976) Research Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Catawba; Ph.D., Wake Forest 

Patricia Adams Johnson (1969) Instructor in English 

B.A., Winston-Salem State; M.A., Wake Forest 

Richard L. Johnson (1977) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Trinity; M.M., Yale; D.M.A., Michigan 

# *W. Dillon Johnston (1973) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Vanderbilt; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Virginia 

Alonzo W. Kenion (1956) Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

Ralph C. Kennedy III (1976) Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Ph.D., California 

William C. Kerr (1970) Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., Wooster; Ph.D., Cornell 

Harry L. King Jr. (1960) Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Richmond; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina 

Ellen E. Kirkman (1975) Alfred Brauer Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A., Wooster; M.A., M.S.. Ph.D., Michigan State 

Judith Knoop (1976) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.S., Clarion State; M.A., Indiana 

Robert Knott (1975) Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., Stanford; M.A., Illinois; Ph.D.. Pennsylvania 

Raymond E. Kuhn (1968) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Carson-Newman; Ph.D., Tennessee 

James Kuzmanovich (1972) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Rose Polytechnic; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

Hugo C. Lane (1973) Assistant Professor of Biology 

Licenciate of the Biological Sciences, Doctorate of the Biological Sciences, Ceneva 

Brian Legakis (1974) Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., California; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago 



*Part-time. 

**On leave, spring 1978. 



175 



Annette LeSiege (1975) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., M.A., San Jose State; Ph.D., Eastman 

David B. Levy (1976) Instructor in Musk 

B.M., M.A., Eastman 

Charles M. Lewis (1968) Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Vanderbilt; Fh.M., Harvard 

Douglas J. Lincoln (1972, 1976) Instructor in Business 

B.S.. SUNY (Buffalo); M.B.A.. Eastern Illinois 

John H. Litcher (1973) Associate Professor of Education 

B.S.. Winona State; M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota 

Gary R. Ljungquist (1972) Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Clark; Ph.D., Cornell 

R. Edward Lobb (1973) Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Toronto; M.A., Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton 

Allan D. Louden (1977) Instructor in Speech Communication 

B.A., Montana State; M.A.. Montana 

Robert W. Lovett (1962, 1968) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Oglethorpe; M.A., Ph.D., Emory 

Sam T. Manoogian (1977) Adjunct Instructor in Psychology 

B.A., Duke; M.A.. Wake Forest; Ph.D., St. Louis 

Gregorio C. Martin (1976) Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

Diplome, Salamanca; M.A., Ph.D.. Pittsburgh 

Don M. Maultsby (1970) Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Wofford; Ph.D., Tulane 

*Jo Whitten May (1972) Instructor in Speech Communication 

B.S., Virginia; MA., Ph.D., North Carolina (Creensboro) 

J. Gaylord May (1961) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. Wofford; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

W. Graham May (1961) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wofford; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

Donna Mayer-Martin (1976) Instructor in Music 

B.M., St. Mary: M.M., Cincinnati 

James C. McDonald (1960) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Washington (St. Louis); M.A., Ph.D., Missouri 

James G. McDowell (1965) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Colgate; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

**Dolly A. McPherson (1974) Lecturer in English 

B.A., Southern; M.A., Boston 



*Part-time. 

**On leave, IQ71-7S. 



76 



Jay Meek (1977) Visiting Lecturer in English 

B.A., Michigan; M.A., Syracuse 

Harry B. Miller (1947) Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Ph.D.. North Carolina 

Joseph O. Milner (1969) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Davidson; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina 

Carlton T. Mitchell (1961) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Vale; S.T.M., Union Seminary; Ph.D., New York 

*John V. Mochnick (1976) Lecturer in Music 

B.M., Heidelberg; MM., Indiana 

Richard A. Moore Jr. (1977) Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S.. M.A., Wake Forest 

**John C. Moorhouse (1969) Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Wabash; Ph.D., Northwestern 

Carl C. Moses (1964) Associate Professor of Politics 

B.A., William and Mary; Ph.D., North Carolina 

William M. Moss (1971) Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Davidson; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Thomas E. Mullen (1957) Professor of History 

B.A., Rollins; M.A., Ph.D.. Emory 

Ronald E. Noftle (1967) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., New Hampshire; Ph.D., Washington 

John W. Nowell (1945) Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Wake Forest; Ph.D., North Carolina 

James C. O'Flaherty (1947) Professor of German 

B.A., Georgetown College; M.A., Kentucky; Ph.D., Chicago 

A. Thomas Olive (1961) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina State 

Jeanne Owen (1956) Professor of Business Law 

B.S., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.C.S., Indiana; J.D., North Carolina 

John E. Parker Jr. (1950) Professor of Education and Romance Languages 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse 

Clarence H. Patrick (1946) Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Andover Newton; Ph.D., Duke 

Nancy C. Pearse (1977) Assistant Professor of English 

B.A.. Texas; M.A., Wisconsin; Ph.D., Columbia 



''Part-time. 

"*C)n leave, 1977-78. 



177 



Philip J. Perricone (1967) Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.S., M.A.. Florida; Ph.D., Kentucky 

Percival Perry (19:39, 1917) Professor of History 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Rutgers; Ph.D., Duke 

Elizabeth Phillips (1957) Professor of English 

B.A., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.A., Iowa; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

*Terisio Pignatti (1971) Visiting Professor of Art History 

Ph.D., Padua 

**Edward H. Platte Jr. (1968. 1977) Instructor in History 

B.A., Princeton; M.A., Stanford 

♦Andrew W. Polk III (1977) Instructor in Art 

B.F.A., Memphis State; M.F.A., Indiana 

Lee Harris Potter (1965) Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina 

Herman J. Preseren (1953) Professor of Education 

B.S., California State (Pennsylvania); M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Gregory D. Pritchard (1968) Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Oklahoma Baptist; B.D., Southern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Columbia 

Teresa Radomski (1977) Instructor in Music 

B.M., Eastman; M.M., Colorado 

Beulah L. Raynor (1946) Assistant Professor of Efiglish 

B.A., East Carolina; M.A., Wake Forest 

tj- Don Reeves (1967) Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Mercer; B.D., Th.M., Southern Baptist Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia 

Jon M. Reinhardt (1964) Associate Professor of Politics 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern; M.A., Ph.D., Tulane 

Paul M. Rihisl (1973) Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Pittsburgh; M.A., Kent State; Ph.D., Illinois 

Laura P. Rice-Sayre (1976) Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Ohio State; M.A., Kent State; Ph.D., Washington 

C. H. Richards Jr. (1952) Professor of Politics 

B.A., Texas Christian; M.A., Ph.D.. Duke 

Stephen H. Richardson (1963) Adjunct Professor of Biology 

B.A., California; M.S., Ph.D., Southern California 

Charles L. Richman (1968) Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Virginia; M.A., Yeshiva; Ph.D., Cincinnati 



*Part-time. 

**Fall 1077. 

■fOn leave, spring 1978. 



178 



Leonard P. Roberge (1974) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A.. New Hampshire; M.A., Atlanta; Ed.D., Maine 

Mary Frances M. Robinson (1952) Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Wilson; M.A.. Ph.D., Syracuse 

Eva Marie Rodtwitt (1966) Lecturer in Romance Languages 

Can. Philol., Oslo 

Joe O'Neal Rogers (1977) Instructor in Economics 

B.A., Oklahoma; M.A., Duke 

Michael Roman (1973) Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Harvard; M.A., Ph.D.. Pennsylvania 

James R. Rook (1977) Instructor in Economics 

B.A., SUNY (Fredonia); M.Ed., North Carolina State 

Laura V. Rouzan (1975) Instructor in Speech Communication 

B.A., Xavier; M.A., Georgia 

Gail L. Sailer (1977) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Bowling Green State; M.A., North Carolina 

Wilmer D. Sanders (1954, 1964) Associate Professor of German 

B.A., Muhlenberg; M.A., Ph.D.. Indiana 

*Janet Clyde Sawyer (1977) Instructor in Music 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.M., Texas Christian 

John W. Sawyer (1956) Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., M.A.. Wake Forest; M.A.. Ph.D.. Missouri 

*Henry M. Sayre (1976) Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Stanford; Ph.D., Washington 

Donald O. Schoonmaker (1965) Associate Professor of Politics 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A.. Ph.D.. Princeton 

**William A. Scott (1975) Professor of Military Science 

B.S., City College (New York); M.P.A.. City l T niversity (New York) 

Richard D. Sears (1964) Associate Professor of Politics 

B.A.. Clark; M.A., Ph.D.. Indiana 

Ben M. Seelbinder (1959) Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Mississippi Delta State; M.A., Ph.D.. North Carolina 

Margaret B. Seelbinder (1961. 1977) Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A., Randolph-Macon; M.A., North Carolina 

Dorothy Jean Carter Seeman (1976) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.S., Ph.D., Georgia 

Timothy F. Sellner (1970) Associate Professor of German 

B.A., Michigan; M.A., Wayne State; Ph.D., Michigan 



*Part-ttme. 
**Fall 1977. 



.79 



Bynum G. Shaw (1965) Lecturer in Journalism 

B.A., Wake Forest 

Howard W. Shields (1958) Professor of Physics 

B.S., North Carolina; M.S., Pennsylvania Stale; Ph.D.. Duke 

*Susan Grate Shillinglaw (1977) Instructor in English 

B.A., Cornell (Iowa); M.A.. North Carolina 

Franklin R. Shirley (1948) Professor of Speech Communication 

B.A., Georgetown; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Florida 

Richard L. Shoemaker (1950) Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Colgate; M.A., Syracuse; Ph.D., Virginia 

Robert N. Shorter (1958) Professor of English 

B.A., Union College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

Michael L. Sinclair (1968) Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford 

David L. Smiley (1950) Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Baylor; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

fj. Howell Smith (1965) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Baylor; M.A., Tulane; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

R. Lance Snyder (1974) Instructor in English 

B.A., Michigan; M.A., Northwestern 

Cecelia H. Solano (1977) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Rack liife; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

Blanche C. Speer (1972) Assistant Professor of Linguistics 

B.A., Howard Payne; M.A., Ph.D., Colorado 

James A. Steintrager (1969) Professor of Politics 

B.A., Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago 

Laura M. Stone (1977) Visiting Assistant Professor of Classical Languages 

B.A., Smith; M.A.. Ph.D.. North Carolina 

Henry Smith Stroupe (1937) Professor of History 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Duke 

David A. Stump (1977) Adjunct Instructor in Psychology 

B.A., Trinity; M.A., Houston 

Anna-Vera Sullam (1972) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., Padua 

Robert L. Sullivan (1962) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Delaware; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State 



*Fall l c >77. 

-fOn leave, spring 1978. 



ISO 



Charles H. Talbert (1963) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Howard; B.D.. Southern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Vanderbilt 

Thomas C. Taylor (1971) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

B.S., M.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., Louisiana State; C.P.A., North Carolina 

Harold C. Tedford (1965) Associate Professor of Theatre Arts 

B.A., Ouachita; M.A., Arkansas; Ph.D., Louisiana State 

Stanton K. Tefft (1964) Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., Michigan State; M.S., Wisconsin; Ph.D., Minnesota 

Mary Beth Thomas (1971) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Agnes Scott; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina 

Mary L. Thomas (1975) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., Ohio; M.A., Michigan 

Anne S. Tillett (1956, 1960) Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Carson-Newman; M.A., Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Northwestern 

*LowelI R. Tillett (1956) Professor of History 

B.A., Carson-Newman; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., North Carolina 

fRichard I. Tirrell (1977) Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Purdue; M.S., Kansas State 

Sylvia Trelles (1977) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., Ripon; M.A., Michigan 

Thomas J. Turner (1952) Professor of Physics 

B.S., North Carolina; M.S., Clemson; Ph.D., Virginia 

Robert W. I'lery Jr. (1971) Assistant Professor of Classical Languages 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Yale 

Marcellus E. Waddill (1962) Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney; M.A.. Ph.D., Pittsburgh 

J. Van Wagstaff (1964) Professor of Economics 

B.A., Randolph-Macon- M.B.A., Rutgers; Ph.D., Virginia 

Anderson H. Walters (1975) Professor of Military Science 

B.S., United States Military Academy; M.S., Ohio State 

Barbara Warren (1976) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Southwest Missouri State; M.S., Indiana 

David S. Weaver (1977) Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., M.A., Arizona; Ph.D., New Mexico 

Peter D. Weigl (1968) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Williams; Ph.D., Duke 

*()n leave, fall l c >77. 
t Part-time, fall l c >77. 



18] 



David Welker (1969) Professor of Theatre Arts 

B.A., M.A., Illinois; Ph.D.. Minnesota 

Larry E. West (1969) Associate Professor of German 

B.A.. Berea; Ph.D., Vanderbili 

Frank H. Whitchurch (1971) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.S., M.A., Minnesota; M.A., Ohio State 

Alan J. Williams (1971) Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Stanford; M.Phil.. Ph.D.. Vale 

George P. Williams (1958) Professor of Physics 

B.S., Richmond; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina 

John E. Williams (1959) Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Richmond; M.A., Ph.D.. Iowa 

kathryn B. Williams (1977) Instructor in Psychology 

B.A.. Miami (Ohio); M.A., Wake Forest 

Edwin Graves Wilson (1946, 1951) Professor of English 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

William A. Wilson (1977) Instructor in English 

B.A., M.A., Virginia 

Donald H. Wolfe (1968) Associate Professor of Theatre Arts 

B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois; Ph.D., Cornell 

Frank B. Wood (1971) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Duke 

Ralph C. Wood Jr. (1971) Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., M.A., Fast Texas State; M.A., Ph.D.. Chicago 

J. Ned Woodall (1969) Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., M.A., Texas; Ph.D., Southern Methodist 

John J. Woodmansee (1965) Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Westminister; M.A., Denver; Ph.D., Colorado 

Raymond L. Wyatt (1956) Professor of Biology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D.. North Carolina 

W. Buck Yearns Jr. (1945) Professor of History 

B.A., Duke; M.A., Georgia; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Richard L. Zuber (1962) Professor of History 

B.S., Appalachian; M.A., Emory; Ph.D., Duke 



182 

Emeriti 



♦Andrew Lewis Aycock (1928-1971) Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Tulane 

Harold M. Barrow (1918-1977) Professor of Emeritus of Physical Education 

B.A., Westminister; M.A., Missouri; P.E.D., Indiana 

Dalnia Adolph Blown (1941-1973) Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., M.A.. North Carolina 

Ruth F. Campbell (1962-1974) Professor Emerita of Spanish 

B.A., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.A., North Carolina; Ph.D.. Duke 

Forrest W. Clouts (1922-21; 1925-1967) Professor Emeritus of History 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A.. Ohio State 

Marjorie Crisp (1947-1977) Associate Professor Emerita of Physical Education 

B.S., Appalachian; M.A., George Peabody 

Ethel T. Crittenden ( 191")- 1946) Librarian Emerita 

Cronje B. Far}) (1940-1971) Professor Emeritus of Classical Languages 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D.. Columbia 

J. Allen Faslev (1928-1963) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

B.A., Furman; Th.M., Southern Baptist Seminary; D.D., Furman 

Edgar Estes Folk (1936-1967) Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.S.. Columbia; Ph.D.. George Peabody 

Roland L. Gay (1933-1972) Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

B.S.. Wake Forest; MS, North Carolina State 

Ralph Cyrus Heath (1954-1969) Professor Emeritus of Marketing 

B.A.. Princeton; M.B.A.. DBA., Indiana 

Owen F. Herring (1946-1963) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; Th.M., Th.D., Southern Baptist Seminary; D.D., Georgetown 

Lois Johnson (1942-1962) Dean of Women Emerita 

B.A., Meredith; M.A., North Carolina 

Robert F. Lee (1946-1977) Professor Emeritus of Law 

B.S., I. LB.. Wake Forest; M.A., Columbia; I.I...M., S.J.D.. Duke 

Thane M< Donald ( 1911-1975) Professor Emeritus of Music 

B.M., MM.. Michigan; Ed.D., Columbia 

Jasper L. Memory Jr. ( 1929-1971 ) Professor Emeritus of Education 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A.. Columbia 

Harold Dawes Parcel! (1935-1970) Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages 

B.A.. North Carolina; A.M.. Ph.D., Harvard 



*Died April 111, 1978. Dates following names indicate period of serine e. 



Grady S. Patterson (1921-1972) 
B.A., Wake Forest 

*Kenneth Tyson Raynor (1926-1961) 

B.A.. Wake Form; M.A., Duke 

Albeit C. Reid (1917-18; 1920-1965) 

B.A., M.A.. Wake Forest; Ph.D., Cornell 



183 

Registrar Emeritus 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 



Paul S. Robinson (1952-1977) Professor Emeritus of Music 

B.A., Westminister; B.M., Curtis; M.S.M., D.S.M., Union Seminary 

Harold Wavland Tiibble (1950-1967) President Emeritus 

B.A., Richmond; Th.M., Th.D., Southern Baptist Seminary; M.A.. Louisville; Ph.D., 
Edinburgh; D.D., Stetson; LL.D., Union University, Wake Forest, Richmond, Duke, 
North Carolina 

Carroll W. Weathers (1950-1972) Professor Emeritus of Pair and 

B.A., I.L.B., Wake Forest Dean Emeritus of the School of Eaw 

Carlton P. West (1928-1975) 

B.A., Boston; M.A., Vale; B.A. in L.S., North Carolina 



Eib ra ria n Emerit us 



*I)ied November 12, 19/ 




184 

The Committees of the Faculty 

September 1, 1978 

The terms of members, except where otherwise shown, expire on August 31 of the 
year indicated. Each committee selects its own chairman except where the chairman is 
designated. All members of a committee vole except as otherwise indicated. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Academic Affairs 

Non-voting. Dean of Men, Dean of Women, Associate Dean, Assistant Dean, and 
one student in the College. Voting. Dean of the College; 1981 Jack D. Fleer, Timothy 
F. Sellner; 1980 Alonzo \V. Kenton, Raymond E. Kuhn; 1979 Eugene Pendleton Banks, 
Marcellus E. Waddill, and one student in the College. 

The Committee on Admissions 

Non-voting. Director of Admissions; Associate Dean of the College; Dean of Women, 
and one student in the College. Voting. Dean of the College; 1981 John W. Nowell, 
Charles H. Talbert; 1980 Herman E. Eure, Robert N. Shorter; 1979 Robert C. Beck, 
Donald Schoonmaker, and one student in the College. 

The Committee on Scholarships and Student Aid 

Non-voting. One student in the College. Voting. Dean of the College; Director of 
Admissions and Financial Aid; Dean of Women; Associate Dean; 1981 Peter D. Weigl, 
Alan J. Williams; 1980 John E. Collins, Anne S. Tillett; 1979 Doyle R. Fosso, Bynum 
C. Shaw, and one student in the College. 

The Committee on Curriculum 

Voting. Provost, Dean of the College, Registrar, and the chairman of each department 
in the College as follows: Division I. Art, Classical Languages, English, German, 
Music, Romance Languages, Speech Communication and Theatre Arts; Division II. 
Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physical Education, Physics; Division III. Educa- 
tion, History, Military Science, Philosophy, Religion; Division IV. Anthropology, 
Business and Accountancy, Economics, Politics, Psychology, Sociology. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Academic Planning 

Non-voting. Provost; and one student in the College. Voting. Dean of the College; 
Director of Libraries; 1982 Elizabeth Phillips, Mary Beth Thomas; 1981 Richard C. 
Barnett, James A. Steintrager; 1980 Elmer Hayashi, W. D. Sanders; 1979 Donald E. 
Frey, Gregory D. Pritchard and one student in the College. 



185 



The Committee on Athletics 

Non-voting. Director of Athletics. Voting. Vice President and Treasurer; Dean ol the 
College; Fac ulty representative t<> the Atlantic Coast Conference; 1983 Ivey C. Gentry, 
Jeanne Owen; 1982 John W. Angell, David K. Evans; 1981 Philippe R. Falkenberg, 
Michael L. Sinclair; 1980 Robert C. Beck, Philip J. Perricone; 1979 Richard 1). Sears. 
J. Van Wagstaff. 

The Committee on Institutional Planning 

Non-voting. Provost, Vice President and Treasurer, and one student in the College. 
Voting. Dean of the College; 1982 Charles M. Allen, Lee H. Potter; 1981 J. Edwin 
Hendricks, John F. Williams; 1980 Ronald E. Noftle, Donald H. Wolfe; 1979 Joseph 
O. Milner, John C. Moorhouse, and one student in the College. 

The Committee on Nominations 

Voting. 1981 John A. Carter Jr., C. H. Richards Jr.; 1980 Howard W. Shields, Lowell 
R. Tillett; 1979 John R. Earle, Mary Frances M. Robinson. 

The Committee on Library Planning 

Non-voting. Provost, Dean of the Graduate School, one faculty representative from 
the Committee on Academic Planning, and one student from the College. Voting. One 
faculty member from each academic department, Dean ol the College, Director ol 
Libraries, and one student from the College. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Publications 

Dean of the College; Vice President and Treasurer; Director of Communications; the 
three faculty advisers of Old Gold and Black. The Student, and The Howler; 1981 
David L. Smiley; 1980 Lee H. Potter; 1979 Michael Roman. 

The Committee for Teacher Education 

Dean of the College; Dean of the Graduate School; Chairman of the Department of 
Education; 1981 Stephen Ewing, Marcus B. Hester; 1980 William L. Hottinger, 
J. Don Reeves; 1979 John F. Dimmick, Roger A. Hegstrom. 

The Committee for the R. O. T. C. 

Dean of the College; the Coordinator of R.O.T.C.; the Professor of Military Science; 
1981 James G. McDowell; 1980 W. Graham May; 1979 Carlton T. Mitchell. 

The Committee on Honors 

Non-x>oting One student in the College. Voting. Dean of the College; the Coordinator 
of the Honors Program; 1982 J. Ned Woodall; 1981 Robert W. Llerv Jr.; 1980 Fred L. 
Horton Jr.; 1979 William C. Kerr, and one student in the College. 



The Committee of Lower Division Advisers 

Dean of the College; Chairman of the Lower Division Advisers; Brian M. Austin, 
James P. Barefield, David B. Broyles, Richard D. Carmichael, Linda N. Clark, 
John E. Collins, Cyclone Covey, John F. Dimmick, Carol S. Disque, Leo Ellison Jr., 
Herman E. Eure, Thomas F. Gossett, Phillip J. Hamrick, Carl V. Harris, Elmer K. 
Hayashi, N. Rick Heatley, Marcus B. Hester, David Allen Hills, Willie Lee Hinze, 
Louise Hoffman, Patricia A. Johnson, William C. Kerr, James Kuzmanovich, Lai 
Leake, Gary R. Ljungquist, James G. McDowell, W. Graham May, Carlton T. 
Mitchell, A. Thomas Olive, Paul M. Ribisl, Eva Rodtwitt, Michael Roman, Laura V. 
Rouzan, Timothy E. Sellner, Robert L. Sullivan, Thomas J. Turner, Robert W. Ulery 
Jr., Marcellus W. Waddill, Peter D. Weigh Larry E. West, Frank H. Whitchurch, Alan 
J. Williams, Ralph C. Wood Jr., J. Ned Woodall, Raymond L. Wyatt. Open 
Cirriculum: Richard C. Barnett, Roger A. Hegstrom, Richard D. Sears, Harold C. 
Tedford. 

The Committee on Orientation 

Dean of the College; Chairman of the Lower Division advisers; Dean of Men, Dean of 
Women, President of the Student Government or representative, and other persons 
from the administration and student body invited by the chairman. 

The Committee on Records and Information 

Non-i'oting. Registrar; Voting. Dean of the College; Archivist; Vice President of the 
Faculty; Secretary of the Faculty; 1981 Charles M. Allen; 1980 FredricT. Howard; 1979 
Julian C. Burroughs Jr. 

The Committee on Open Curriculum 

Dean of the College; 1982 David W. Hadley, William C. Kerr; 1981 John A. Carter Jr., 
Donald Schoonmaker; 1980 Richard C. Barnett, Roger A. Hegstrom; 1979 Richard D. 
Sears, Harold C. Tedford. 

JOINT FACULTY/ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEES 

The Joint Admissions Committee 

Dean of the College, Director of Admissions, Provost, Herman E. Eure, Jack D. Fleer, 
Donald Schoonmaker. 

The Judicial Council 

Administration: Toby A. Hale, Richard W. McBride. Faculty; Fred L. Horton Jr., 
Blanche C. Speer, Jeanne Owen, Marcellus Waddill, George P. Williams; two students 
in the College. Faculty alternates: Richard C. Barnett, Carlton T. Mitchell. Admin- 
istrative alternate: Patricia A. Johnson; and one student alternate. 



187 



The Committee on Student Life 

Dean of the College or designate; Dean of Women; Dean of Men; 1981 Ralph C. 
Wood Jr.; 1980 Dorothy Casey; 1979 Leo Ellison, and three students from Wake 
Forest College. 

Faculty Marshals 

Carlton T. Mite hell, John E. Parker Jr., Mary Frances M. Robinson. 

UNIVERSITY SENATE 

President; Provost; Vice President for Health Affairs; Vice President and Treasurer; 
Dean of the College; Dean of the Graduate School; Dean of the School of Law; Dean of 
the Babcock Graduate School of Management; Dean of the Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine; Director of Libraries; and the following: 

Representatives of the College: 1982 Alonzo W. Renion, James C. O'Flaherty; 1981 
E. Pendleton Banks, C. H. Richards Jr.; 1980 John L. Andronica, Delmer P. Hylton; 
1979 Doyle R. Fosso, John E. Parker Jr. 

Representatives of the Graduate School: 1982 Robert W. Cowgill; 1981 H. Wallace 
Band; 1980 Richard C. Barnett; 1979 Thomas F. Gossett. 

Representatives of the School of Law: 1981 Rhoda B. Billings; 1979 Hugh W. Divine. 

Representatii'es of the Babcock Graduate School of Management: 1981 William 
Heisler; 1979 Peter R. Peacock. 

Representatii'es of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine: 1982 Eben Alexander; 1981 
Robert W. Prichard; 1980 Walter J. Bo; 1979 C. Douglas Maynard. 





President Jimmy Carter on campus, March 17, 1978. 



189 



Index 



Academic Awards, 23 

Academic Buildings, 18 

Academic Calendar, 31 

Accountancy, 69 

Accreditation, 9 

Administration, 19, 161 

Admission Deposit, 29 

Admission Requirements, 27 

Advanced Placement, 28 

Advising, 31 

Alcoa Foundation Scholarship, 37 

Alpha Omega Scholarship, 38 

Anthropology, 56 

Application for Admission, 27 

Applied Music, 105 

Applied Music Fees, 29 

Art, 59 

Art Collections, 26 

Art History, 59 

Asian Studies, 62 

Athletic Awards, 24 

Athletic Scholarships, 24 

Athletics, 24 

Attendance Requirements, 32 

Auditing, 33 

Babcock Graduate School of 

Management, 8 
Basic Course Requirements, 49 
Basic Educational Opportunity 

Grants, 38 
Biology, 63 

Board of Trustees, 8, 158 
Board of Visitors, 8, 159 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine, 8 
Brown Scholarship, 38 
Bryan Foundation Student Loan 

Plan, 41 
Buildings and Grounds, 18 
Bushnell Baptist Church Loan 

Fund, 41 
Business, 67 

Business and Accountancy, 67 
Calendar, 2 
Campus Ministry, 25 
Career Development Services, 26 
Carroll Scholarship, 38 
Carswell Scholarships, 37 
Carver Scholarship, 38 
Case Referral Board, 22 



Challenge Symposium, 25 

Charges, 29 

Chemistry, 70 

Chinese, 130 

Choral Ensembles 25, 105 

Church Choir Work Grants, 44 

Class Attendance, 32 

Classical Languages, 72 

Classics, 74 

Classification, 32 

CLEP, 28 

College History and Development, 11 

College Scholarships, 38 

College Union, 22 

College Work Study Program, 43 

Committees of the Faculty, 184 

Concerts, 25 

Concessions, 42 

Council Fund, 41 

Course Numbers, 56 

Course Repetition, 35 

Courses of Instruction, 56 

Crowell Scholarship, 38 

Cultural Activities, 25 

Cultural Resources, 26 

Dance, 25, 109 

Dean's List, 35 

Debate, 25 

Degree Requirements, 48 

Degrees, 9, 48 

Degrees Conferred, 141 

Denmark Loan Fund, 13, 41 

Dentistry Degree, 54 

Deposits, 29 

Distinctions Conferred, 148 

Divisional Course Requirements, 49 

Double Majors, 51 

Dropping a Course, 33 

Dunn Loan Fund, 41 

Duplin County Loan Fund, 40 

Early Decision, 28 

Earnshaw Loan Fund, 41 

Economics, 75 

Education, 78 

Emeriti, 182 

Engineering Degree, 54 

English, 83 

Enrollment Summary, 153 

Examinations, 34 



190 



Expenses, 29 

Faculty, 168 

Faculty Marshals, 187 

Fees, 29 

Fields of Study, 50 

Financial Aid, 37, 43 

Food Services, 31 

Forestry Degree, 55 

Four-Week Courses, 46 

Fraternities, 23 

Freeman Scholarship, 38 

French, 126 

French Exchange Scholarship, 43 

French Semester, 46, 129 

Friendly Student Loan Fund, 41 

Geographical Distribution, 154 

German, 87 

German Exchange Scholarship, 43 

Gill Scholarship, 38 

Glover Scholarship, 38 

Goebel Scholarship, 38 

Grade Reports, 35 

Grading System, 34 

Graduate School, 8 

Graduation Distinctions, 35 

Graduation Fee, 30 

Graduation Requirements, 36 

Greek, 73 

Hamrick Scholarship, 39 

Hankins Loan Fund, 41 

Hankins Scholarships, 37 

Harris Loan Fund, 41 

Health Service, 30 

Hebrew, 125 

Hindi, 130 

History, 89 

Hobgood Scholarship, 39 

Holhfield Scholarship, 39 

Honors Study, 45 

Honor Council, 22 

Honor Societies, 23 

Honor System, 21 

Housing, 31 

Howler, 25 

Humanities, 93 

Independent Study, 47 

Indian Semester, 47 

Instrumental Ensembles. 25, 105 

Intercollegiate Athletics, 24 

Interdisciplinary Honors, 95 

Interfraternity Council, 23 

Intersociety Council, 23 

Intramural Athletics, 24 



Italian, 130 

January Study, 46 

Joint Majors, 51 

Journalism, 85 

Judicial Board, 22 

Keiger Scholarship, 39 

Kent Scholarships, 39 

Kirkpatrick-Howell Scholarship, 39 

Knott Scholarship, 24 

Langston Loan Fund, 42 

Latin, 73 

Law Degree, 52 

Law School, 8 

Libraries, 9 

Literature Lectures. 25 

Loans. 41 

London Semester, 46 

Lower Division Requirements, 48, 50 

Management School, 8 

Mathematical Economics, 76, 97 

Mathematics, 97 

Mathematics-Biology, 64, 97 

Mathematics-Business, 68. 97 

Maximum Number of Courses, 51 

McDonald Scholarship, 39 

Medals. 23 

Medical School, 8 

Medical Sciences Degree, 53 

Medical Technology Degree. 53 

Men's Residence Council, 22 

Microbiology Degree, 54 

Military Science, 100 

Ministerial Aid Fund, 43 

Ministerial Concessions, 42 

Mortar Board, 23 

Music, 101 

Music Education. 104 

Music History, 102 

Music Theory, 101 

National Direct Student Loan 

Program, 42 
Norfleet Scholarship, 39 
North Carolina Insured Student Loan 

Program, 42 
North Carolina Student Incentive 

Grants, 39 
Norton Loan Fund, 42 
Norwegian, 131 
Old Gold and Black, 25 
Omicron Delta Kappa, 23 
Open Curriculum, 45 
Opera, 25. 104 
Orientation, 31 



191 



Palmer Award, 24 

Parham Scholarship, 39 

Pass/Fail Grades, 33 

Pettus Scholarship, 40 

Phi Beta Kappa, 9, 23 

Philosophy, 106 

Philosophy Seminar, 25 

Physical Education, 108 

Physical Education Requirement, 50 

Physician Assistant Program 

Degree, 53 
Physics, 112 
Piccolo Award, 24 
Placement Services, 26 
Politics, 1 13 
Poteat Scholarship, 40 
Powers Fund, 42 
Probation, 36 
Procedures, 27 
Professional Fraternities, 23 
Professional Schools, 8 
Psychological Services, 26 
Psychology, 1 18 
Publications, 25 
Pullen Scholarship, 40 
Purpose, 19 
Raby Loan Fund, 42 
Radio, 25 

Radio/Television/Film, 139 
Readmission Requirements, 36 
Recognition, 9 
Recreational Activities, 24 
Refunds, 30 
Registration, 32 
Rehabilitation Concessions, 43 
Religion, 121 
Religion Lectures, 25 
Religious Activities, 25 
Repetition of Courses, 35 
Requirements for Continuation, 35 
Requirements for Degrees, 48 
Residence Councils, 22 
Residence Hall Charges, 31 
Residential Buildings, 18 
Residential Language Centers, 45 
Revell Scholarship, 40 
Reynolds Scholarship, 40 
Romance Languages, 126 
Room Charges, 29, 31 
ROTC, 100 

ROTC Scholarships, 40 
Russian, 131 



Salem College Study, 45 

Scholarships, 37 

Senate, 187 

Senior Conditions, 36 

Senior Testing, 52 

Sigma Xi, 9 

Slate Loan Fund, 42 

Social Sciences, 134 

Societies, 23 

Sociology, 134 

Spanish, 131 

Spanish Exchange Scholarship, 43 

Spanish Semester, 47, 134 

Special Programs, 45 

Speech Communication, 136 

Sternberger Scholarships, 40 

Straughan Scholarship, 40 

Student /Student Spouse Employment, 

44 
Student/Faculty Committees, 184 
Student Government, 21 
Student Legislature, 21 
Student Life, 21 
Student Magazine, 25 
Studio Art, 61 
Study Abroad, 46 
Summer Session, 46 
Summer Study Elsewhere, 46 
Supplemental Education Opportunity 

Grants, 40 
Sykes Scholarship, 40 
Teaching Area Requirements, 79 
Theatre Arts, 139 
Transcripts, 30, 35 
Transfer Credit, 28 
Trustees, 158 
Tuition, 29 

Tyner-Pittman Scholarship, 41 
Williams Scholarship, 41 
Wilson Scholarship, 41 
Wyatt Scholarship, 41 
University, 8 

Upper Division Study, 50 
Venice Semester, 46, 131 
Vehicle Registration, 30 
Veteran Benefits, 44 
Visitors, 159 
WFDD-FM, 25 
Withdrawal, 33 

Women's Residence Council, 22 
Work /Study Program, 43 
Worsham Scholarship, 24 



Bulletins of Wake Forest University 

The College 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

7305 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5201 

The School of Law 

Director of Admissions 

7206 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5437 

The Summer Session 

Dean of the Summer Session 

7293 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5227 

The Graduate School 

Dean of the Graduate School 

7487 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5301 

The Babcock Graduate School of Management 

Director of Admissions 

7659 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5422 

The Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Associate Dean for Admissions 

300 Hawthorne Road 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27103 

919-727-4265 

William E. Ray, Editor 



Wake Forest University administers all educational and employment 
activities without discrimination because of race, color, religion, national 
origin, age, handicap, or sex, except where exempt. 




Director of Admissions 
Wake Forest University 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 



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Winston Salem, North Carolina 

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